Aaron Hagedorn

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States

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Publications (6)8 Total impact

  • Eileen M. Crimmins, Aaron Hagedorn
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy life expectancy is the length of expected life lived in a healthy state; remaining life would be unhealthy life. When health is defined by ability and disability, the measure is usually referred to as active and inactive life. Those with higher socioeconomic status can expect to live more healthy years and fewer unhealthy years; as a consequence of this, socioeconomic differences in healthy life expectancy tend to be greater than differences in total life expectancy. At age 70, there is a 1 year difference in total life expectancy for men with a high school degree versus those with less education; however, there is a 1.5 year difference in years lived without disability. For women, the difference is 2.2 years of expected life with some disability versus 1.5 years difference in total life expectancy.
    Annual review of gerontology & geriatrics 10/2010; 30(1):305-321.
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    ABSTRACT: The multistate life table (MSLT) model is an important demographic method to document life cycle processes. In this paper, we present the SPACE (Stochastic Population Analysis for Complex Events) program to estimate MSLT functions and their sampling variability. It has several advantages over other programs, including the use of micro-simulation and the bootstrap method to estimate the variance of MSLT functions. Simulation enables researchers to analyze a broader array of statistics than the deterministic approach, and may be especially advantageous in investigating distributions of MSLT functions. The bootstrap method takes sample design into account to correct the potential bias in variance estimates.
    Demographic Research 01/2010; 22(6):129-158. · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, we examine changes in life expectancy free of disability using longitudinal data collected from 1984 through 2000 from two cohorts who composed the Longitudinal Studies of Aging I and II. Life expectancies with and without ADL and/or IADL disability are calculated using a Markov-based multistate life table approach. At age 70, disability-free life expectancy increased over a 10-year period by 0.6 of a year in the later cohort, which was the same as the increase in total life expectancy, both increases marginally statistically significant. The average length of expected life with IADL and ADL disability did not change. Changes in disability-free life expectancy resulted from decreases in disability incidence and increases in the incidence of recovery from disability across the two survey cohorts. Age-specific mortality among the ADL disabled declined significantly in the later cohort after age 80. Mortality for the IADL disabled and the nondisabled did not change significantly. Those with ADL disability at age 70 experienced substantial increases in both total life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy. These results indicate the importance of efforts both to prevent and delay disability and to promote recovery from disability for increasing life expectancy without disability. Results also indicate that while reductions in incidence and increases in recovery work to decrease population prevalence of disability, declining mortality among the disabled has been a force toward increasing disability prevalence.
    Demography 08/2009; 46(3):627-46. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite similar standards of living and health care systems for older persons, there are marked differences in the relative health of the elderly populations in the United States (US) and Japan. We explore the association of overweight and obesity with these health disparities. Data on older adults from the US National Health Interview Survey (1994) and the Longitudinal Study of Aging II (1994) were compared to similar data from the 1999-2001 Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging. Regression analyses for the 2 countries were conducted to examine the correlates of being overweight and obese, and the relationships of overweight and obesity with activities of daily living functioning, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is higher in the US than in Japan, as is the prevalence of heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and functioning problems. Education level and marital status are predictors of overweight for older Americans but not for older Japanese people. Health behaviors affect weight in all groups. The prevalence of functioning problems and disease are more likely to be associated with being overweight in US men and women than in Japanese women, and are not associated with being overweight in Japanese men. Despite similar standards of living and health care systems for older persons, the conditions associated with poor health differ in the US and Japan. Being overweight or obese appears to be related to more functioning problems and arthritis in the US than in Japan.
    Journal of Epidemiology 01/2009; 18(6):280-90. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Life expectancy is higher in Japan than in the United States. We compared the prevalence of clinically recognized risk factors in the two countries to explore the possibility that differences in these likely precursors to disease and death are linked to the paths to higher mortality for Americans. We found that American men and women have higher levels of total biological risk than the Japanese, particularly for risk factors included in the metabolic syndrome. A significant difference between the two countries is the higher prevalence of overweight among Americans. On the other hand, measured blood pressure appears more favorable among Americans. A larger proportion of Americans use prescription drugs, which results in lowered levels of measured biological risk. There are large differences in the prevalence of a number of risk factors between American and Japanese women less than age 40; this could mean that Americans develop biological risk earlier in life or that the differences are growing larger in more recent cohorts. Copyright (c) 2008 The Population Council, Inc..
    Population and Development Review 10/2008; 34(3):457-482. · 2.22 Impact Factor
  • Eileen M Crimmins, Jung Ki Kim, Aaron Hagedorn
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines gender differences in life with and without six major diseases, including both mortal and morbid conditions. Disease prevalence and health behavior data are from the 1993-1995 National Health Interview Surveys for the United States. Vital registration data are the source of mortality rates used in computing life expectancy. The Sullivan method is used to estimate life lived with and without disease and risky behavior for men and women at various ages. Women live more years with each of the diseases examined, and, for arthritis, the extended years with disease are greatest. Women also live more years than men free of each of these diseases with the exception of arthritis. Gender differences in life without two health-risk behaviors are also discussed. Men spend more years of their lives overweight and have fewer years during which they see a doctor.
    Journal of Women & Aging 02/2002; 14(1-2):47-59. · 0.54 Impact Factor