Lisa S McAnulty

Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, United States

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Publications (65)197.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that berries contain bioactive compounds which reduce certain cancers and hypertension. Our hypothesis was that daily blueberry consumption would increase natural killer cells and plasma redox capacity and reduce blood pressure, augmentation index, central pulse wave velocity, and aortic systolic pressures. Twenty five men and postmenopausal women aged 18-50 were recruited and randomized to blueberry (BB) (n = 13) or placebo groups (PL) (n = 12). Participants were provided with blueberry (equivalent to 250g berries) or placebo powders each day for six weeks. Blood pressure, vascular performance testing, and blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-supplementation). Participants returned after six weeks and repeated all procedures. Pre- to post- supplementation comparisons for the main effects of treatment, time, and treatment-time interaction were made using a 2 (treatment) x 2 (times) repeated measures ANOVA for all vascular measures, redox status, and NK cell counts. Anthropometric measures were compared using t-tests. Body mass, composition, and overall blood pressures were not affected in either group. Overall, augmentation index and aortic systolic pressures were decreased in BB (treatment effect: p = 0.024 and p = 0.046, respectively). Plasma redox was not affected. Absolute natural killer cells were increased in BB (time, p = 0.001 and interaction, p = 0.012). Subjects (n = 9) with pre-hypertensive pressures (>120/80 mmHg, respectively) were examined as a subset using t-tests and exhibited significant reductions in diastolic pressure (p = 0.038) from pre to post-supplementation in BB. We conclude that blueberry ingestion for six weeks increases natural killer cells and reduces augmentation index, aortic systolic pressure, and diastolic pressures in sedentary males and females.
    Nutrition Research 07/2014; · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Resveratrol and quercetin function as antioxidants and anti-inflammatories in vitro, but these mechanisms have been minimally examined in combination in exercising humans. The purpose of this investigation was to examine supplementation as a countermeasure against oxidative stress and inflammation in response to exercise. Fourteen athletes were randomly assigned, in a double-blind crossover design, to a resveratrol and quercetin combination (RQ) (120 mg resveratrol and 225 mg quercetin for 6 days and 240 mg resveratrol and 450 mg quercetin on day 7 just prior to exercise) or to placebo (P). There was a 1-week washout between trials. Blood was taken at baseline, pre-exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h after exercise. Plasma was analyzed for oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls), antioxidant capacity (ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), oxygen radical absorptive capacity (ORAC)), and inflammation (cytokine interleukin (IL)-8 and C-reactive protein (CRP)). Statistical design utilized a 2 × 3 ANOVA and Student's t test. Pre-exercise values were not different from baseline for any measure. The postexercise increase in F2-isoprostanes was significantly less (p = 0.039 interaction) with RQ (68%) than with P (137%). Protein carbonyls, FRAP, ORAC, and TEAC significantly increased after exercise but were not affected by treatment. IL-8 and CRP increased significantly immediately after exercise but were not affected by treatment. These data indicate that RQ significantly reduces exercise-induced lipid peroxidation without associated changes in inflammation or plasma antioxidant status.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 07/2013; 38(7):760-5. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blueberries are rich in antioxidants known as anthocyanins, which may exhibit significant health benefits. Strenous exercise is known to acutely generate oxidative stress and an inflammatory state, and serves as an on-demand model to test antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 250 g of blueberries per day for 6 weeks and 375 g given 1 h prior to 2.5 h of running at ∼72% maximal oxygen consumption counters oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune changes. Twenty-five well-trained subjects were recruited and randomized into blueberry (BB) (N = 13) or control (CON) (N = 12) groups. Blood, muscle, and urine samples were obtained pre-exercise and immediately postexercise, and blood and urine 1 h postexercise. Blood was examined for F₂-isoprostanes for oxidative stress, cortisol, cytokines, homocysteine, leukocytes, T-cell function, natural killer (NK), and lymphocyte cell counts for inflammation and immune system activation, and ferric reducing ability of plasma for antioxidant capacity. Muscle biopsies were examined for glycogen and NFkB expression to evaluate stress and inflammation. Urine was tested for modification of DNA (8-OHDG) and RNA (5-OHMU) as markers of nucleic acid oxidation. A 2 (treatment) × 3 (time) repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Increases in F₂-isoprostanes and 5-OHMU were significantly less in BB and plasma IL-10 and NK cell counts were significantly greater in BB vs. CON. Changes in all other markers did not differ. This study indicates that daily blueberry consumption for 6 weeks increases NK cell counts, and acute ingestion reduces oxidative stress and increases anti-inflammatory cytokines.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 11/2011; 36(6):976-84. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Consumption of plant flavonoids, antioxidants, and n-3 fatty acids is proposed to have many potential health benefits derived primarily through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study examined the effects of 1,000 mg quercetin + 1,000 mg vitamin C (QC); 1,000 mg quercetin, 1,000 mg vitamin C, 400 mg isoquercetin, 30 mg epigallocatechin gallate, and 400 mg n-3 fatty acids (QFO); or placebo (P), taken each day for 2 wk before and during 3 d of cycling at 57% W(max) for 3 hr, on plasma antioxidant capacity (ferricreducing ability of plasma [FRAP], oxygen-radical absorbance capacity [ORAC]), plasma oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes), and plasma quercetin and vitamin C levels. Thirty-nine athletes were recruited and randomized to QC, QFO, or P. Blood was collected at baseline, after 2 wk supplementation, immediately postexercise, and 14 hr postexercise. Statistical design used a 3 (groups) × 4 (times) repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc analyses. Plasma quercetin was significantly elevated in QC and QFO compared with P. Plasma F(2)-isoprostanes, FRAP, and vitamin C were significantly elevated and ORAC significantly decreased immediately postexercise, but no difference was noted in the overall pattern of change. Post hoc analyses revealed that the QC and QFO groups did not exhibit a significant increase in F(2)-isoprostanes from baseline to immediately postexercise compared with P. This study indicates that combining flavonoids and antioxidants with n-3 fatty acids is effective in reducing the immediate postexercise increase in F(2)-isoprostanes. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of changes in plasma antioxidant capacity.
    International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism 08/2011; 21(4):328-37.
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    ABSTRACT: n-3 fatty acids are known to exert multiple beneficial effects including anti-inflammatory actions that may diminish oxidative stress. Supplementation with antioxidant vitamins has been proposed to counteract oxidative stress and improve antioxidant status. Therefore, this project investigated the effects of daily supplementation in 48 trained cyclists over 6 wk and during 3 d of continuous exercise on F2-isoprostanes (oxidative stress), plasma n-3 fatty acids, and antioxidant status (oxygen radical absorption capacity and ferric-reducing antioxidant potential). Cyclists were randomized into n-3 fatty acids (N3) (n = 11) (2000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and 400 mg of docosahexaenoic acid), a vitamin-mineral (VM) complex (n = 12) emphasizing vitamins C (2000 mg), E (800 IU), A (3000 IU), and selenium (200 microg), a VM and n-3 fatty acid combination (VN3) (n = 13), or placebo (P) (n = 12). Blood was collected at baseline and preexercise and postexercise. A 4 x 3 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to test main effects. After exercise, F2-isoprostanes were higher in N3 (treatment effect P = 0.014). Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid plasma values were higher after supplementation (interaction effect P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively) in both n-3 supplemented groups. Oxygen radical absorption capacity declined similarly among all groups after exercise. Ferric-reducing antioxidant potential exhibited significant interaction (P = 0.045) and significantly increased after exercise in VN3 and VM (P < 0.01). This study indicates that supplementation with n-3 fatty acids alone significantly increases F2-isoprostanes after exhaustive exercise. Lastly, antioxidant supplementation augments plasma antioxidant status and modestly attenuates but does not prevent the significant n-3 fatty acid associated increase in F2-isoprostanes postexercise.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 02/2010; 42(9):1704-11. · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous evidence suggests that quercetin supplementation increases performance in humans. We examined the effects of 3 weeks of quercetin supplementation on fuel utilization, gross efficiency (GE), and perceived effort during 3 h of cycling over 3 successive days. Forty cyclists were randomized into quercetin and placebo groups and tested for maximal oxygen consumption (53.2 +/- 1.2 and 54.7 +/- 1.1 mL.kg(-1).min(-1)). For 3 weeks following maximal oxygen consumption testing, subjects supplemented either 1000 mg.day(-1) quercetin or placebo during normal training. Following supplementation, subjects cycled at 57% maximum power for 3 h, on 3 successive days, using their own bicycles fitted to CompuTrainer Pro Model trainers (RacerMate, Seattle, Wash.). Metabolic measurements were taken every 30 min for each 3-h ride. Muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis immediately pre-exercise and postexercise on days 1 and 3 were analyzed for muscle glycogen content. Power output remained constant for all 3 exercise trials, but significant decreases over time were measured for GE, cadence, respiratory exchange ratio, blood glucose, and muscle glycogen. Significant increases were measured for heart rate and volume of oxygen consumption over time. No quercetin treatment effect was observed for any of the outcome measures in this study. These data indicate that GE is reduced during an exhausting 3-h bout of exercise. However, quercetin did not significantly affect any outcomes in these already well-trained subjects.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 12/2009; 34(6):993-1000. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous evidence suggests that quercetin supplementation increases performance in humans. We examined the effects of 3 weeks of quercetin supplementation on fuel utilization, gross efficiency (GE), and perceived effort during 3 h of cycling over 3 successive days. Forty cyclists were randomized into quercetin and placebo groups and tested for maximal oxygen consumption (53.2 ± 1.2 and 54.7 ± 1.1 mL·kg-1·min-1). For 3 weeks following maximal oxygen consumption testing, subjects supplemented either 1000 mg·day-1 quercetin or placebo during normal training. Following supplementation, subjects cycled at 57% maximum power for 3 h, on 3 successive days, using their own bicycles fitted to CompuTrainer Pro Model trainers (RacerMate, Seattle, Wash.). Metabolic measurements were taken every 30 min for each 3-h ride. Muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis immediately pre-exercise and postexercise on days 1 and 3 were analyzed for muscle glycogen content. Power output remained constant for all 3 exercise trials, but significant decreases over time were measured for GE, cadence, respiratory exchange ratio, blood glucose, and muscle glycogen. Significant increases were measured for heart rate and volume of oxygen consumption over time. No quercetin treatment effect was observed for any of the outcome measures in this study. These data indicate that GE is reduced during an exhausting 3-h bout of exercise. However, quercetin did not significantly affect any outcomes in these already well-trained subjects.D'après des études antérieures, un supplément de quercétine améliorerait la performance chez les humains. Cette étude se propose d'analyser les effets de trois semaines de supplémentation en quercétine sur l'utilisation des substrats, le rendement brut et la perception de l'intensité de l'effort au cours d'une séance d'exercice sur vélo d'une durée de 3 h, et ce, durant 3 jours consécutifs. Quarante cyclistes divisés aléatoirement en deux groupes, l'un recevant un supplément de quercétine et l'autre un placebo présentent le consommation d'oxygene maximale suivant : 53,2 ± 1,2 mL·kg-1·min-1 et 54,7 ± 1,1 mL·kg-1·min-1, respectivement. Au cours des 3 semaines suivant l'évaluation du VO2 max, les sujets s'entraînent comme à l'habitude tout en recevant leur supplément (1000 mg·jour-1) ou leur placebo selon le cas. Après la période de supplémentation, les sujets pédalent 3 heures par jour pendant 3 jours consécutifs à une intensité équivalent à 57 % puissance maximale sur leur propre vélo installé sur un rouleau d'entraînement CompuTrainer Pro Model (RacerMate, Seattle, WA). Au cours des 3 h de la séance d'exercice, on effectue l'analyse des gaz toutes les 30 min. Les jours 1 et 3, on prélève des échantillons de tissu musculaire du vastus lateralis immédiatement avant et après la fin de la séance d'exercice et on analyse le contenu en glycogène. La puissance produite au cours des 3 séances d'exercice demeure constante, mais le rendement brut, la cadence, le ratio d'échanges gazeux, les concentrations de glucose sanguin et de glycogène musculaire diminuent significativement. Par ailleurs, on observe une augmentation significative de la fréquence cardiaque et du consommation d'oxygene au fil du temps. On n'observe pas d'effet du traitement à la quercétine sur les variables mesurées dans cette étude. D'après ces observations, le rendement brut diminue au cours de 3 h d'exercice épuisant. La quercétine n'a pas d'effet significatif sur les variables retenues chez ces sujets déjà bien entraînés.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 11/2009; 34(6):993-1000. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exercise increases mRNA for genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative enzyme capacity. However, little is known about how these genes respond to consecutive bouts of prolonged exercise. We examined the effects of 3 h of intensive cycling performed on three consecutive days on the mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in trained human subjects. Forty trained cyclists were tested for VO(2max) (54.7 +/- 1.1 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). The subjects cycled at 57% watts(max) for 3 h using their own bicycles on CompuTrainer Pro Model trainers (RacerMate, Seattle, WA) on three consecutive days. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis pre- and post-exercise on days one and three. Muscle samples were analyzed for mRNA content of peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1alpha), sirtuin 1 (Sirt-1), cytochrome c, and citrate synthase. Data were analyzed using a 2 (time) x 2 (day) repeated measures ANOVA. Of the mRNA analyzed, the following increased from pre to post 3 h rides: cytochrome c (P = 0.006), citrate synthase (P = 0.03), PGC-1alpha (P < 0.001), and Sirt-1 (P = 0.005). The following mRNA showed significant effects from days one to three: cytochrome c (P < 0.001) and citrate synthase (P = 0.01). These data show that exhaustive cycling performed on three consecutive days resulted in both acute and chronic stimuli for mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in already trained subjects. This is the first study to illustrate an increase in sirtuin-1 mRNA with acute and chronic exercise. These data contribute to the understanding of mRNA expression during both acute and successive bouts of prolonged exercise.
    Arbeitsphysiologie 08/2009; 107(4):419-27. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of quercetin supplementation on ratings of perceived exertion in ultramarathon runners competing in the 160-km Western States Endurance Run (WSER). Sixty-three runners were randomized to quercetin (Q) and placebo (P) groups, and under double blinded methods ingested four supplements per day with or without 250 mg quercetin for 3 weeks before the WSER. Thirty-nine of the 63 subjects (quercetin N = 18, placebo N = 21) finished the race. At the completion of exercise ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed at aid stations located at 40, 90, 125, 150, and 160 km (finish line). The pattern of change in RPE over time was not significantly different between the Q and P groups. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) did not significantly increase throughout the race (15.2 +/- 2.9 at 40 km -14.2 +/- 4.0 at 160 km) for both groups combined. Race times were not different between the groups (Q = 26.4 +/- 0.7 h and P = 27.5 +/- 0.6 h). Significant time main effects (p < 0.001) were found for both serum glucose and cortisol throughout the race. Quercetin supplementation for 3 weeks prior to the WSER had no effect on RPE during competitive self-paced ultramarathon running. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) did not increase in a linear fashion but instead fluctuated nonmonotonically throughout the self-paced endurance running event.
    Research in Sports Medicine An International Journal 04/2009; 17(2):71-83. · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/2009; 41. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research indicates that ultramarathon exercise can result in blood oxidative stress. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the efficacy of oral supplementation with quercetin, a naturally occurring compound with known antioxidant properties, as a potential countermeasure against blood oxidative stress during an ultramarathon competition. In double-blind fashion, 63 participants received either oral quercetin (250 mg, 4x/day; 1,000 mg/day total) or quercetin-free supplements 3 weeks before and during the 160-km Western States Endurance Run. Blood drawn before and immediately after (quercetin finishers n = 18, quercetin-free finishers n = 21) the event was analyzed for changes in blood redox status and oxidative damage. Results show that quercetin supplementation did not affect race performance. In response to the ultramarathon challenge, aqueous-phase antioxidant capacity (ferric-reducing ability of plasma) was similarly elevated in athletes in both quercetin and quercetin-free treatments and likely reflects significant increases in plasma urate levels. Alternatively, trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity was not altered by exercise or quercetin. Accordingly, neither F2-isoprostances nor protein carbonyls were influenced by either exercise or quercetin supplementation. In the absence of postrace blood oxidative damage, these findings suggest that oral quercetin supplementation does not alter blood plasma lipid or aqueous-phase antioxidant capacity or oxidative damage during an ultramarathon challenge.
    International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism 01/2009; 18(6):601-16. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effects of oat beta-glucan (BG) supplementation on chronic resting immunity, exercise-induced changes in immune function, and self-reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) incidence in human endurance athletes. Trained male cyclists were randomized to BG (N = 19) or placebo (P; N = 17) groups and under double-blind procedures received BG (5.6 g x d(-1)) or P beverage supplements for 2 wk before, during, and 1 d after a 3-d period in which subjects cycled for 3 h x d(-1) at approximately 57% maximal watts. URTI symptoms were monitored during BG supplementation and for 2 wk afterward. Blood samples were collected before and after 2 wk of supplementation (both samples, 8:00 a.m.), immediately after the 3-h exercise bout on day 3 (6:00 p.m.), and 14 h after exercise (8:00 a.m.) and were assayed for natural killer cell activity (NKCA), polymorphonuclear respiratory burst activity (PMN-RBA), phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation (PHA-LP), plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-1 receptor agonist (IL-1ra), and IL-8, and blood leukocyte IL-10, IL-8, and IL-1ra mRNA expression. Chronic resting levels and exercise-induced changes in NKCA, PMN-RBA, PHA-LP, plasma cytokines, and blood leukocyte cytokine mRNA did not differ significantly between BG and P groups. URTI incidence during the 2-wk postexercise period did not differ significantly between groups. An 18-d period of BG versus P ingestion did not alter chronic resting or exercise-induced changes in immune function or URTI incidence in cyclists during the 2-wk period after an intensified exercise.
    Medicine and science in sports and exercise 09/2008; 40(8):1463-71. · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quercetin is a flavonoid compound that has been demonstrated to be a potent antioxidant in vitro. The objective of this study was to evaluate if quercetin ingestion would increase plasma antioxidant measures and attenuate increases in exercise-induced oxidative damage. Forty athletes were recruited and randomized to quercetin or placebo. Subjects consumed 1000 mg quercetin or placebo each day for 6 weeks before and during 3 d of cycling at 57% work maximum for 3 h. Blood was collected before and immediately after exercise each day, and analyzed for F2-isoprostanes, nitrite, ferric-reducing ability of plasma, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and C-reactive protein. Statistical analyses involved a 2 (treatment) x 6 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance to test main effects. F2-isoprostanes, nitrite, ferric-reducing ability of plasma, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and C-reactive protein were significantly elevated as a result of exercise, but no group effects were found. Despite previous data demonstrating potent antioxidant actions of quercetin in vitro, this study indicates that this effect is absent in vivo and that chronic quercetin ingestion does not exert protection from exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 05/2008; 33(2):254-62. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study measured the influence of the flavonoid quercetin on immune changes and incidence rates of upper respiratory tract infections in ultramarathoners competing in the 160-km Western States Endurance Run. Sixty-three runners were randomized to quercetin and placebo groups, and under double-blinded methods ingested 1000 mg/day quercetin for 3 wks before, during, and 2 wks after the race. Thirty-nine of the 63 subjects (n = 18 for quercetin, n = 21 for placebo) finished the race and provided blood and saliva samples the morning before the race and 15 - 30 min postrace. Upper respiratory tract infections were assessed during the week before and the 2-wk period after the race using an illness symptom checklist. Race times did not differ significantly between quercetin and placebo groups. Significant pre- to postrace decreases were measured for natural killer cells (43 %), granulocyte respiratory burst activity (55 %), and salivary IgA output (48 %), and increases for neutrophil (288 %) and monocyte (211 %) cell counts, with no significant group differences. Postrace illness rates did not differ between groups. In conclusion, quercetin supplementation for 3 wks before and 2 wks after the Western States Endurance Run had no effect on illness rates, perturbations in leukocyte subset counts, or decreases in granulocyte respiratory burst activity and salivary IgA.
    International Journal of Sports Medicine 02/2008; 29(10):856-63. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of quercetin on plasma cytokines, leukocyte cytokine mRNA, and related variables in ultramarathoners competing in the 160-km Western States Endurance Run (WSER). Sixty-three runners were randomized to quercetin and placebo groups and under double-blinded methods ingested 1000 mg/day quercetin for 3 weeks before the WSER. Thirty-nine of the 63 subjects (n = 18 for quercetin, n = 21 for placebo) finished the race and provided blood samples the morning before the race and 15-30 min postrace. Significant prerace to postrace WSER increases were measured for nine proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory plasma cytokines, cortisol (quercetin = 94%, placebo = 96%), serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (mean +/- SE absolute increase, quercetin = 31.8 +/- 4.2, placebo = 38.2 +/- 5.0 mg/L), and creatine kinase (CK) (quercetin = 21,575 +/- 3,977, placebo = 19,455 +/- 3,969 U/L), with no significant group differences. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA did not change post-WSER, with a significant decrease measured for leukocyte IL-8 mRNA (0.21 +/- 0.03-fold and 0.25 +/- 0.04-fold change from rest, quercetin and placebo, respectively) and significant increases for IL-1Ra mRNA (1.43 +/- 0.18-fold and 1.40 +/- 0.16-fold change, quercetin and placebo, respectively) and IL-10 mRNA (12.9 +/- 3.9-fold and 17.2 +/- 6.1-fold change, quercetin and placebo, respectively), with no significant differences between groups. In conclusion, quercetin ingestion (1 g/day) by ultramarathon athletes for 3 weeks before a competitive 160-km race significantly increased plasma quercetin levels but failed to attenuate muscle damage, inflammation, increases in plasma cytokine and hormone levels, and alterations in leukocyte cytokine mRNA expression.
    Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research 01/2008; 27(12):1003-11. · 3.90 Impact Factor
  • Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/2008; 40. · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/2008; 40. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Urate is a metabolic end product of purine metabolism that contributes about 66% of the antioxidant capacity of plasma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the importance of plasma urate as an antioxidant using pharmacological lowering and examining the impact on plasma antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress after intense exercise. Fifteen subjects ran for 45 min at approximately 80% VO2 max under the influence of probenecid (1 g/d) (PRO) or placebo (PLA) in a double-blind, crossover design. Blood samples obtained at baseline, pre-exercise, and immediately post-exercise were analyzed for F2-isoprostanes, lipid hydroperoxides (LHs), ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), urate, ascorbate (AA), and nitrite. A 2 (group)x2 (time) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests, and Student's t tests were used for statistical analysis. PRO exhibited lowered urate and FRAP compared with baseline (p<or=0.05), and group effects existed for the exercise trials (p=0.023 and p<or=0.001, respectively) versus PLA. F2-isoprostanes, nitrite, and AA were increased after exercise (p=0.004, p=0.001, and p=0.003, respectively), but the pattern of change was not different between treatments. This study indicates that plasma markers of exercise-induced oxidative stress were not affected by below-normal physiological concentrations of urate and a diminished antioxidant capacity within the plasma compartment.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 12/2007; 32(6):1148-55. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Indirect markers of muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness were examined and correlated to changes in oxidative stress, plasma antioxidant potential, and use or nonuse of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 60 ultra-marathoners following the Western States Endurance Run. Blood was collected prior to and immediately following the race and analyzed for muscle damage by creatine phosphokinase and oxidative stress by F (2)-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls, and lipid hydroperoxides and antioxidant potential by the ferric reducing ability of plasma. Subjects recorded delayed onset muscle soreness during the week following the race. Lipid hydroperoxide concentrations were unchanged, but F (2)-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls, ferric reducing ability of plasma, creatine phosphokinase, and delayed onset muscle soreness increased significantly postrace. Protein carbonyls were significantly higher postrace in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users versus nonusers (p < 0.05). However, there was no difference between users and non-users for all other markers. Postrace creatine phosphokinase concentrations were not correlated with oxidative stress markers but were correlated with changes in delayed onset muscle soreness. Based upon these findings, caution should be used when consuming nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during ultra distance events.
    International Journal of Sports Medicine 12/2007; 28(11):909-15. · 2.37 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
197.69 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2013
    • Appalachian State University
      • Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science
      Boone, NC, United States
    • Auburn University
      Auburn, Alabama, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Montana
      • Department of Health and Human Performance
      Missoula, Montana, United States