Ulaş Karaöz

Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (3)70.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We generated high-resolution maps of histone H3 lysine 9/14 acetylation (H3ac), histone H4 lysine 5/8/12/16 acetylation (H4ac), and histone H3 at lysine 4 mono-, di-, and trimethylation (H3K4me1, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, respectively) across the ENCODE regions. Studying each modification in five human cell lines including the ENCODE Consortium common cell lines GM06990 (lymphoblastoid) and HeLa-S3, as well as K562, HFL-1, and MOLT4, we identified clear patterns of histone modification profiles with respect to genomic features. H3K4me3, H3K4me2, and H3ac modifications are tightly associated with the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes, while H3K4me1 and H4ac have more widespread distributions. TSSs reveal characteristic patterns of both types of modification present and the position relative to TSSs. These patterns differ between active and inactive genes and in particular the state of H3K4me3 and H3ac modifications is highly predictive of gene activity. Away from TSSs, modification sites are enriched in H3K4me1 and relatively depleted in H3K4me3 and H3ac. Comparison between cell lines identified differences in the histone modification profiles associated with transcriptional differences between the cell lines. These results provide an overview of the functional relationship among histone modifications and gene expression in human cells.
    Genome Research 07/2007; 17(6):691-707. DOI:10.1101/gr.5704207 · 13.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function in several major areas. First, our studies provide convincing evidence that the genome is pervasively transcribed, such that the majority of its bases can be found in primary transcripts, including non-protein-coding transcripts, and those that extensively overlap one another. Second, systematic examination of transcriptional regulation has yielded new understanding about transcription start sites, including their relationship to specific regulatory sequences and features of chromatin accessibility and histone modification. Third, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure has emerged, including its inter-relationship with DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. Finally, integration of these new sources of information, in particular with respect to mammalian evolution based on inter- and intra-species sequence comparisons, has yielded new mechanistic and evolutionary insights concerning the functional landscape of the human genome. Together, these studies are defining a path for pursuit of a more comprehensive characterization of human genome function.
    Nature 07/2007; 447(7146):799-816. DOI:10.1038/nature05874 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The regulation of transcriptional initiation in the human genome is a critical component of global gene regulation, but a complete catalog of human promoters currently does not exist. In order to identify regulatory regions, we developed four computational methods to integrate 129 sets of ENCODE-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation data. They collectively predicted 1393 regions. Roughly 47% of the regions were unique to one method, as each method makes different assumptions about the data. Overall, predicted regions tend to localize to highly conserved, DNase I hypersensitive, and actively transcribed regions in the genome. Interestingly, a significant portion of the regions overlaps with annotated 3'-UTRs, suggesting that some of them might regulate anti-sense transcription. The majority of the predicted regions are >2 kb away from the 5'-ends of previously annotated human cDNAs and hence are novel. These novel regions may regulate unannotated transcripts or may represent new alternative transcription start sites of known genes. We tested 163 such regions for promoter activity in four cell lines using transient transfection assays, and 25% of them showed transcriptional activity above background in at least one cell line. We also performed 5'-RACE experiments on 62 novel regions, and 76% of the regions were associated with the 5'-ends of at least two RACE products. Our results suggest that there are at least 35% more functional promoters in the human genome than currently annotated.
    Genome Research 06/2007; 17(6):720-31. DOI:10.1101/gr.5716607 · 13.85 Impact Factor