P Ouyang

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

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Publications (18)196.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We studied canine coronary arterial vasoreactivity after occlusion and reperfusion to examine whether reduced flow or pressure contributed to the abnormalities observed. Ischemia and reperfusion alter endothelial and myocardial function. Causative factors may include altered flow, complement activation or free radical production by endothelial or white blood cells after reoxygenation and neutrophil activation. The coronary arteries of anesthetized, open chest dogs were subjected to 90-min occlusion +/- 2 h of reperfusion. The effect of reperfusion on arterial responses to intracoronary acetylcholine, nitroprusside and phenylephrine was studied using in vivo ultrasound. Arterial segments were also harvested, perfused ex vivo with cell-free buffer and exposed to potassium chloride, nitroprusside, acetylcholine and bradykinin. The effect of ex vivo flow cessation with or without maintained intralumen pressure was also studied. Results are expressed as mean value +/- SEM. In vivo arterial cross-sectional area increased during infusion with acetylcholine (10(-5) mol/liter [18.5 +/- 9%]) and nitroprusside (10(-5) mol/liter [22.5 +/- 10%]) and decreased with phenylephrine (10(-5) mol/liter [7.6 +/- 7%]). After reperfusion, acetylcholine caused 13.5 +/- 9% vasoconstriction. Nitroprusside and phenylephrine responses were unchanged. Reperfused arterial segments also showed impaired vasodilation in response to 10(-6) mol/liter of acetylcholine (10.6 +/- 5.1% vs. 47.1 +/- 4.9% in control vessels) and 10(-8) mol/liter of bradykinin (4.4 +/- 6.7% vs. 27.9 +/- 8% in control vessels). Ex vivo flow cessation impaired acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation, but this abnormality was prevented when high intralumen pressure was maintained during the no-flow period. Reduction in flow and intralumen pressure contribute to the impaired acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation seen after coronary occlusion. This is prevented by maintaining high intralumen pressure during the no-flow period, suggesting that hemodynamic forces may change endothelial function independent of circulating complement or blood cell elements.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 05/1994; 23(5):1216-23. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Demand-related myocardial ischemia detected by treadmill testing is commonly used to identify high-risk patients after myocardial infarction (MI). Although ischemia detected by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring (AECG) has also been shown to predict poor outcome in some patient groups, the relationship between AECG-detected ischemic ST changes and post-MI treadmill ischemia is unknown. We screened 94 patients after MI with 24-hour AECG monitoring and a Naughton treadmill test. Forty-two patients were excluded because of left bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, abnormal baseline ST segments, or digoxin therapy. In the remaining 52 patients, AECG was performed 5.1 +/- 2.2 days after MI (mean +/- SD) and the treadmill test 8.4 +/- 2.2 days after MI. Each patient was taking the same drugs for both studies, had no interim revascularization procedures, and all studies were interpreted blindly. The treadmill test (ETT) was positive for ST changes and/or thallium reperfusion defects in 19 of 52 patients (36%). The AECG was positive for ischemia (ST depression greater than 1 mm, for more than 1 minute) in 14 of 52 patients (27%) (Group I), with 9.9 +/- 8.2 ischemic episodes per patient lasting 13.5 +/- 7.5 minutes per episode. The AECG was negative for ischemia in the remaining 38 patients (73%) (Group II). The ETT and AECG correlation was as follows: 9 patients with AECG-detected ischemic ST changes had positive ETT results; 10 patients without AECG-detected ischemic ST changes had positive ETT results; 5 patients with AECG-detected ischemic ST changes had negative ETT results; and 28 patients without AECG-detected ischemic ST changes had negative ETT results (p < 0.02 by chi 2). The predictive accuracy of a positive AECG identifying a positive ETT was 65% (specificity 85%, sensitivity 47%), and the predictive accuracy of a negative AECG identifying a negative ETT was 74%. Group I patients were older than Group II patients (63.6 +/- 8.2 years versus 53.2 +/- 10.6 years p < 0.02), more commonly had painless ETT ischemia (43% versus 18% p = 0.08), and tended to have positive ETT results at a lower level of exercise (366 +/- 210 seconds versus 588 +/- 212 seconds, p = 0.04). Ischemic ST changes as detected by AECG monitoring correlate significantly with post-MI treadmill test results with a high specificity, albeit a low sensitivity. In patients without baseline ST-segment abnormalities and limited exercise capability, AECG monitoring may be of limited use in identifying early post-MI ischemia.
    The American Journal of Medicine 10/1993; 95(4):371-6. · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Postinfarction angina carries a poor prognosis, with a 20-70% incidence of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) or death within the subsequent 3-6 months. The pathophysiologic mechanisms causing postinfarction angina may include thrombus, complex coronary arterial lesions that form a nidus for thrombus formation, inadequate collateral supply following acute MI, or intimal endothelial dysfunction. The role of thrombus has been established in the pathophysiology of Q-wave MI, and thrombolytic treatment of patients presenting with acute transmural MI has been shown to salvage left ventricular function and to reduce mortality. However, thrombolytic therapy for the acute MI does not reduce the incidence of recurrent ischemia or infarction, as is evident from the 18-26% incidence of recurrent ischemia reported in the Thrombolysis and Angioplasty in Myocardial Infarction (TAMI) and Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) trials. In the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Streptochinasi nell'Infarto Miocardico (GISSI) study the incidence of reinfarction was documented as 4% in the streptokinase group, which was actually significantly greater than in the placebo group (2%). In a randomized placebo-controlled study of thrombolysis for postinfarction angina, 29 patients were randomized to placebo (P group, n = 17) or to thrombolytic therapy (T group, n = 12). Patient groups were similar with respect to age, location of MI, ejection fraction, severity of coronary artery disease, and antianginal therapy. Patients underwent coronary angiography 6 +/- 1 days postinfarction. Filling defects consistent with intracoronary thrombus was seen in 11 of 12 T group patients and in 11 of 17 P group patients prior to treatment. Lysis occurred in 7 of 11 T patients and 1 of 11 P (p less than 0.02). Holter-detected silent ischemia was compared pre- and posttherapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    The American Journal of Cardiology 10/1991; 68(7):119B-124B. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence and clinical significance of silent myocardial ischemia occurring in the early period after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was studied in 59 patients who had an uncomplicated early course after admission for AMI. Calibrated 2-lead ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring performed for 39 +/- 2 hours starting 4 +/- 1 days after AMI identified silent myocardial ischemia, defined as greater than or equal to 1 mm ST-segment change lasting greater than or equal to 2 minutes, in 27 patients. These patients had 5 +/- 1 episodes lasting a median of 11 minutes/episode (range 2 to 36 minutes/episode). Patients with and without silent ischemia had comparable baseline demographics, were receiving similar anti-ischemic medications and had similar severity of coronary disease by angiography. No reinfarctions occurred during the in-hospital period. Fourteen of 27 patients (52%) with silent ischemia had greater than or equal to 1 in-hospital clinical ischemic event (pulmonary edema, n = 5, cardiac death, n = 1, and postinfarction angina, n = 11). In contrast, only 7 of 32 patients without silent ischemia (22%) had greater than or equal to 1 in-hospital event (pulmonary edema, n = 1, cardiac death, n = 1, and postinfarction angina, n = 6). The frequency of ischemic events was significantly greater in patients with silent ischemia compared to those without silent ischemia, p less than 0.02. Silent ischemia occurs frequently very early after AMI and identifies a group of patients who are at increased risk for adverse in-hospital clinical outcomes.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 03/1990; 65(5):267-70. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary disease causes the majority of perioperative complications after peripheral vascular surgery. Twenty-four patients with stable coronary disease undergoing peripheral revascularization were studied using continuous electrocardiographic monitoring to determine the incidence of perioperative asymptomatic myocardial ischemia and its relation to postoperative clinical ischemic events. Patients were monitored preoperatively (17 +/- 1 hours), intraoperatively and postoperatively (29 +/- 2 hours) using 4-channel calibrated amplitude-modulated units. Fifteen patients (63%) had early postoperative silent ischemia; 3 also had preoperative silent ischemia and 5 intraoperative transient ischemia. Patients with and without silent ischemia had similar clinical characteristics, perioperative antianginal medications and postoperative episodes of hemodynamic instability. However, 8 of 15 patients (53%) with silent ischemia had postoperative clinical ischemic events (2 had myocardial infarction, 2 had new congestive heart failure and 4 had new rest angina), versus only 1 of 9 patients (11%) without silent ischemia who had angina (p less than 0.05). Early postoperative silent myocardial ischemia occurs frequently after vascular surgery and is associated with postoperative clinical ischemic events.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 12/1989; 64(18):1113-6. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The influence of nifedipine on left ventricular ejection fraction, infarct size, and infarct expansion was studied in a prospective, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial in 132 patients with low risk acute myocardial infarction of less than 12 hours duration, defined by an initial left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 35% and clinical Killip class of less than or equal to II. Sixty four patients were assigned to nifedipine 120 mg/day and 68 to placebo. Treatment was started on average (SEM) 8.0 (0.2) hours after onset of pain and continued for six weeks. Gated blood pool scans, thallium scans, and cross sectional echocardiograms were performed before treatment and at 10 days. There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, sex, cardiac risk factors, or use of other medications. Mean (SEM) global left ventricular ejection fraction was not different before treatment (nifedipine group 53 (2%), placebo group 55 (2%) and did not differ at 10 days (nifedipine group 54 (2%), placebo group 52 (2%). There were also no differences in regional wall motion or regional ejection fractions. Thallium defects quantified by computer analysis were similar in both groups before treatment (nifedipine 7.8 (0.7), placebo 7.9 (0.7)) and at 10 days (nifedipine 5.3 (0.7) placebo 5.3 (0.7)). In the subgroup of patients with transmural infarction who had good quality echocardiograms and serial studies (n = 30), there was no difference in mean (SEM) baseline infarct segment lengths between the two groups (nifedipine 70 (4) mm, placebo 65 (4) mm); however, the nifedipine group demonstrated no significant change in infarct segment length between the initial and 10 day studies ( + 0.6 (3) mm) while there was a significant increase in the infarct segment length in the placebo group (+ 7.8 (4) mm). The infarct segment length increased by >/= 1 cm in seven (47%) placebo patients but in only one (7%) nifedipine patient. The nifedipine group had a significant initial 10% decrease in mean arterial pressure whereas there was no change in the in the placebo group; this blood pressure difference persisted for 10 days. Thus although the early administration of nifedipine has no detectable effect on clinical outcome and infarction size, it may reduce early infarct expansion via an afterload reduction mechanism in patients with transmural infarction. These initial results must be interpreted with caution and need to be confirmed in a larger trial.
    Heart 04/1988; 59(4):411-8.
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    ABSTRACT: We present a report of cardiac dilatation and symptomatic congestive heart failure in two patients receiving treatment with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Both patients had previous partial parathyroidectomies and persistent hypocalcemia prior to the development of a congestive cardiomyopathy. The hypocalcemia was unresponsive to treatment with activated vitamin D therapy; however, intravenous replenishment of the ionized serum calcium level was accompanied by improvement in cardiac functional parameters. In one of the two patients, chronic calcium repletion with high dialysate calcium was associated with significant improvement in cardiac symptoms and a decrease in left ventricular dilatation. These observations suggest that partial parathyroidectomy and associated hypocalcemia place patients on CAPD at increased risk of cardiac dysfunction.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 02/1988; 11(1):76-9. · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients who survive an acute myocardial infarction face an increased risk of sudden death for approximately 6 months after hospital discharge; their prognosis is determined by the severity of their coronary arteriosclerosis and the degree of left ventricular dysfunction. Frequent ventricular premature complexes and evidence of ischemia either spontaneously or on treadmill are also markers for early morbidity and mortality in patients who are discharged from the hospital after acute myocardial infarction. The degree of left ventricular dysfunction is the strongest predictor of mortality; patients who have both left ventricular dysfunction, frequent premature ventricular beats and evidence of ischemia are at the highest risk of mortality after hospital discharge. It appears likely that all 3 of these risk factors interact and that therapy to reduce morbidity and mortality after myocardial infarction should aim at the amelioration of each of these risk factors. A model for the interaction of these risk factors is proposed and an approach to treatment for patients at high risk of mortality after hospital discharge after myocardial infarction is suggested.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 02/1988; 61(3):7B-12B. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sixty consecutive patients were studied who had positive responses to Naughton exercise treadmill testing (at least 1.5 mm of ST-segment shift in at least 2 leads or thallium reperfusion abnormalities) with or without symptoms of angina 11 +/- 1 days after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). All patients had undergone coronary angiography 24 +/- 4 days after infarction. Thirty-eight patients (63%) had no treadmill angina (silent ischemia, group I) and 22 patients had typical treadmill angina (symptomatic ischemia, group II). Use of beta-blocking drugs, calcium antagonists and nitrates at the time of exercise testing did not differ in the 2 groups. All 9 patients with diabetes mellitus were in the asymptomatic group (p less than 0.40) and group I had a greater proportion of inferior wall AMI (30 of 38) than group II (11 of 22, p = 0.02). Total exercise treadmill test duration (group I 422 +/- 31 seconds, group II 400 +/- 46 seconds) and rate-pressure product were not different in the 2 groups. The number of patients unable to exercise 5 minutes (12 in group I and 7 in group II), the number with diffuse electrocardiographic changes (9 in group I and 7 in group II), and the number with inadequate blood pressure response (8 in group I and 4 in group II) were also similar. At coronary arteriography the mean number of arteries with at least 70% diameter stenosis was 2.0 +/- 0.2 in group I and 2.2 +/- 0.2 in group II (difference not significant).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    The American Journal of Cardiology 05/1987; 59(8):730-4. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the prevalence and prognostic importance of silent myocardial ischemia detected by continuous electrocardiographic monitoring in 70 patients with unstable angina. All the patients received intensive medical treatment with nitrates, beta-blockers, and calcium-channel blockers. Continuous electrocardiographic recordings were made during the first two days in the coronary care unit to quantify the frequency and duration of asymptomatic ischemic episodes, defined as a transient ST-segment shift of 1 mm or more. Thirty-seven patients (Group 1) had at least one episode of silent ischemia, and the other 33 patients had no silent ischemia (Group 2). Over the subsequent month, myocardial infarction occurred in 6 patients in Group 1 and in only 1 in Group 2 (P less than 0.01); bypass surgery or angioplasty was required for recurrent symptomatic angina in 10 patients in Group 1 and only 3 in Group 2 (P = 0.02). Survival-curve analysis demonstrated that silent ischemia was associated with these outcomes (P less than 0.002), and multivariate analysis showed that silent ischemia was the best predictor of these outcomes among the 15 variables tested (P less than 0.002). Patients in Group 1 with 60 minutes or more of silent ischemia per 24 hours had a worse prognosis than those with under 60 minutes per 24 hours (P = 0.04). Silent ischemia occurred in more than 50 percent of our patients with unstable angina, despite intensive medical therapy, and it identified a subset who were at high risk for early unfavorable outcomes.
    New England Journal of Medicine 06/1986; 314(19):1214-9. · 51.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The value of the addition of beta-blockers to coronary vasodilator therapy in the treatment of patients with unstable angina at rest is controversial. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled 4 week trial of propranolol in 81 patients with unstable angina, 39 of whom were assigned to placebo and 42 of whom received propranolol in a dose of at least 160 mg daily. All patients were also treated with coronary vasodilators, including 80 mg nifedipine daily and long-acting nitrates. The incidences of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and requirement for bypass surgery or coronary angioplasty did not differ between the two groups (propranolol = 16; placebo = 18). The propranolol group had a lower cumulative probability of experiencing recurrent resting angina than the placebo group (p = .013), and over the first 4 days of the trial the mean number of clinical episodes of angina (propranolol 0.9 +/- 0.2, placebo 1.8 +/- 0.3, p = .036), duration of angina (propranolol 15.1 +/- 4.3 min, placebo 38.1 +/- 8.4, p = .014), and nitroglycerin requirement (propranolol 1.1 +/- 0.3 tablets, placebo 3.5 +/- 0.8, p = .003) were also fewer. Continuous electrocardiographic recording for ischemic ST segment changes revealed fewer daily ischemic episodes in the propranolol group (2.0 +/- 0.5) than in the placebo group (3.8 +/- 0.7, p = .03), and a shorter duration of ischemia (propranolol 43 +/- 10 min, placebo 104 +/- 28 min, p = .039). Thus propranolol, in patients with unstable angina, in the presence of nitrates and nifedipine is not detrimental and reduces the frequency and duration of symptomatic and silent ischemic episodes.
    Circulation 03/1986; 73(2):331-7. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intraaortic balloon (IAB) counterpulsation is a proven treatment for patients with refractory ischemia or cardiogenic shock; however its use has been largely limited to tertiary centers due to the difficulties and risks encountered in transporting patients with this device in place. We report our initial experience with 11 patients who underwent IAB counterpulsation at a community hospital utilizing a portable transport IAB system. All 11 patients had successful IAB insertion, resulting in prompt stabilization. Immediate transportation during uninterrupted IAB counterpulsation was successfully accomplished in each case using routine ambulance vehicles, allowing for the prompt initiation of further tertiary care. The role of portable IAB counterpulsation in the community hospital and guidelines for the implementation of this portable IAB system are outlined.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis 02/1986; 12(1):18-22.
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    ABSTRACT: Eight open chest dogs underwent 25 min of coronary occlusion to determine whether brief myocardial ischemia disrupts the normal myocardial inotropic response to sympathetic nervous stimulation. If so, this could represent a mechanism contributing to postischemic myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial segment shortening was measured using ultrasonic dimension crystals before and after coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion. Left ansa subclavia stimulation and systemic norepinephrine (NE) infusion were used to test the myocardial inotropic response to neural stimulation and direct exposure to the sympathetic mediator, respectively. Before coronary artery occlusion, base-line preischemic segment shortening (12.5 +/- 1.6%) (SEM) increased during both sympathetic stimulation (20.2 +/- 1.4%) and NE infusion (19.7 +/- 1.1%). The control segment responded similarly. After ischemia and reperfusion there was no significant change in heart rate, aortic or left ventricular pressures, nor changes in control segment shortening. In contrast, shortening in the postischemic segment was markedly reduced compared to baseline (4.1 +/- 2.4%), and no longer responded to sympathetic stimulation (2.4 +/- 2.8%), while responsiveness to systemic NE was maintained (12.9 +/- 2.0%), P less than 0.001, which suggested injury to the sympathetic-neural axis during the period of ischemia. This reduced response to neural stimulation was persistent for up to 2 h after reperfusion. Left atrial or intracoronary infusion of bretylium tosylate, which releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, resulted in an immediate inotropic response in the postischemic segment, which indicated that total depletion of NE from nerve terminals during the ischemic period had not occurred. Disruption of sympathetic neural responsiveness is likely a component of the mechanism of postischemic myocardial dysfunction whenever there is appreciable sympathetic drive to the heart.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 06/1985; 75(5):1504-9. · 12.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although unstable angina can be initially controlled with medical therapy in most patients, there is a high incidence of subsequent death, myocardial infarction, or need for coronary bypass surgery to control symptoms. Identification at the time of presentation of the patient likely to do poorly on continued medical therapy would be useful in advising consideration of surgical therapy. Since coronary arterial spasm may have a significant role in the pathophysiology of unstable angina in some patients, the recently developed calcium channel antagonists may therefore be of particular benefit in the medical therapy of unstable angina. One hundred thirty-eight patients were entered into a randomized double-blind study of the efficacy of adding nifedipine to conventional treatment of unstable angina (nitrates and beta-blockers) and were followed for 18 months. Of these patients, 104 underwent coronary arteriography. A multivariate Cox's hazard function analysis was applied to variables selected from the history, electrocardiographic (ECG) changes during chest pain, and from scintigraphic and coronary arteriographic data to determine those variables most predictive of response to medical therapy. The percentage of the left ventricular myocardium supplied by vessels with 70% or greater luminal stenosis was the most significant variable in influencing failure of medical therapy defined as sudden death, myocardial infarction, or need for bypass surgery. Whether or not the patient received nifedipine was the second most powerful variable, with the use of nifedipine reducing by half the relative risk of failing medical therapy. These were followed by cigarette smoking and presence of global ST segment changes during ischemia. After 18 months the nifedipine group had fewer patients failing medical therapy (p = .02), with fewer patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery (p less than .01). However, nifedipine did not appear to have a preventive effect against myocardial infarction or death. Kaplan-Meier actuarial curves confirmed that medical therapy was significantly less successful in the presence of increasing numbers of significantly stenotic vessels (p = .03). However, nifedipine provided a significant beneficial effect in patients with two or more stenotic vessels (p less than .01) and in whom 50% or more of the myocardium was supplied by vessels with 70% or greater stenosis (p = .01). Thus, although patients with advanced obstructive coronary disease have the greatest likelihood of unfavorable outcomes, the addition of nifedipine is of significant benefit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
    Circulation 10/1984; 70(3):367-76. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two-dimensional echocardiography identified intracavitary masses in the right heart in two patients presenting with extensive pulmonary embolism. In one, a right ventricular mass was identified which was confirmed at subsequent autopsy to be an organizing thromboembolus. In the second patient, a right atrial mass was identified; it disappeared with thrombolytic therapy which was accompanied by clinical improvement. We demonstrate that intracardiac thrombi associated with pulmonary embolism may be identified noninvasively by two-dimensional echocardiography. We suggest the presence of thrombi may represent a large intravascular thrombus. This recognition may influence therapeutic decisions.
    Chest 10/1983; 84(3):296-9. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the efficacy of adding nifedipine to the conventional treatment of unstable angina in 138 patients in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. There was no difference between the two groups in the dose of conventional antianginal medication or in age, prior myocardial infarction, ejection fraction, or other risk factors. Failure of medical treatment (defined as sudden death, myocardial infarction, or bypass surgery within four months) occurred in 43 of 70 patients given placebo and in 30 of 68 given nifedipine. Kaplan-Meier survival-curve analysis of the number and time dependence of treatment failures demonstrated a benefit of nifedipine over placebo (P = 0.03). The benefit was particularly marked in patients with ST-segment elevation during angina (P = 0.02). Side effects (transient hypotension or diarrhea) required withdrawal of the drug from four patients given nifedipine and from one given placebo. We conclude that the addition of nifedipine to conventional therapy is safe and effective in unstable angina.
    New England Journal of Medicine 05/1982; 306(15):885-9. · 51.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the energy level required to defibrillate normal myocardium is low and constant, as determined from studies of induced ventricular fibrillation, little is known of the specific energy requirements in regionally ischemic hearts for spontaneous or induced ventricular fibrillation. In this study the lowest energy threshold for defibrillation was determined in 10 open chest dogs with reversible 10 minute coronary occlusions at various sites for each of 44 events of ventricular fibrillation, using apical and superior vena caval electrodes with a generator providing variable output of 1 to 30 watt seconds. The ischemic mass, quantitated from postmortem angiographic and planimetric data, was 52 +/- 9 percent (mean +/- standard deviation) of the left ventricle in dogs with induced ventricular fibrillation (Group I), 52 +/- 12 percent in dogs with spontaneous ventricular fibrillation after occlusion (Group II) and 54 +/- 9 percent in dogs with spontaneous ventricular fibrillation after reperfusion (Group III). Defibrillation thresholds in watt seconds were 9 +/- 7 in Group I (n = 12), 19 +/- 10 in Group II (n = 13) and 18 +/- 10 in Group II (n = 19). (Group I versus Groups II and III, probability [p] less than 0.025). In nonischemic hearts, the defibrillation threshold was 3 +/- 2 (n = 32) (p less than 0.001 compared with values in Group I, II or III). Thus, despite similar masses of ischemia, twice as much energy was required for defibrillation of spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (whether after occlusion or reperfusion) as for induced ventricular fibrillation, suggesting that these conditions are caused by different metabolic or pathologic derangements. Such differences should be considered in assessing interventions such as drug therapy designed to inhibit the repetitive ventricular response and in design of implantable defibrillators.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 10/1981; 48(3):455-9. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Unstable angina that occurs in the early postinfarction period is associated with an increased incidence of unfavorable cardiac events despite aggressive medical therapy. We examined the results of coronary angioplasty in 47 consecutive patients with postinfarction unstable angina who were referred for the procedure 12.9 +/- 7 days following myocardial infarction, 14 of which were Q wave and 33 of which were non-Q-wave. Coronary angioplasty was performed on a total of 55 arteries with a mean predilatation stenosis of 95 +/- 8%. These included 46 infarct-related arteries and nine noninfarct arteries. Double-vessel angioplasty was performed in eight patients. Successful coronary angioplasty (greater than 30% reduction of predilatation stenosis) was achieved in 43 patients (91%), with a mean residual stenosis of 33 +/- 28%. There was one in-hospital death, one patient required emergency bypass surgery, and two patients had early reocclusion resulting in myocardial infarctions. The 39 patients who had successful angioplasty procedures and who were discharged from the hospital without an unfavorable outcome were followed for 16.3 +/- 7 months, and repeat coronary angioplasty was required in five patients from 45 to 105 days after the initial procedure. Two patients had subsequent elective bypass surgery, one had a recurrent myocardial infarction, and one patient had a noncardiac death. For selected patients with suitable coronary anatomy, coronary angioplasty appears to offer an efficacious therapeutic option for early postinfarction unstable angina.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis 13(2):93-9.