Yoshiko Takahashi

Wayo Women's University, Tiba, Chiba, Japan

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Publications (38)103.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although fish and meat may exert opposing influences on chronic disease, information on the balance of intake between fish and meat to overall diet quality is limited, particularly in Japanese, who have a much higher fish intake than Western populations. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that intake balance between fish and meat is associated with food and nutrient intakes in young Japanese women. The subjects were 3716 Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 20 years. Diet was assessed by a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. The dietary ratio of fish to meat was calculated from fish and meat intakes as a temporal indicator of overall intake balance. The ratio of fish to meat intake was associated positively with intakes of vegetables, fruits, pulses, dairy products, and alcohol, and negatively with those of energy-containing beverages and fat and oils. At the nutrient level, the ratio of fish to meat intake was associated negatively with intakes of energy, total fat, saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin B(1), and zinc, and positively with those of protein, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, and key vitamins and minerals. After limiting analysis to nutrients derived from foods other than fish and meat, the ratio of fish to meat intake was positively associated with intakes of almost all vitamins and minerals examined. In conclusion, women who consumed more fish than meat (ratio >1) tended to choose more favorable food groups that included higher amounts of vegetables and fruits, resulting in a better profile of nutrient intake patterns.
    Nutrition research 03/2011; 31(3):169-77. DOI:10.1016/j.nutres.2011.02.005 · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: How human chronotype is correlated to nutrient and food-group intakes and dietary behavior remains to be elucidated. We cross-sectionally examined the association between the midpoint of sleep and these dietary variables in young Japanese women. A calculated halfway point between bedtime and rise time was used as midpoint of sleep. The subjects were 3304 female Japanese dietetics students aged 18-20years from 53 institutions in Japan. Dietary intake during the previous month was assessed by a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. The midpoint of sleep was calculated using self-reported bedtimes and rise times. Late midpoint of sleep was significantly negatively associated with the percentage of energy from protein and carbohydrates, and the energy-adjusted intake of cholesterol, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin D, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B(6), folate, rice, vegetables, pulses, eggs, and milk and milk products. It was also significantly positively associated with the percentage of energy from alcohol and fat, and the energy-adjusted intake of noodles, confections, fat and oil, and meat. Furthermore, subjects with a later midpoint of sleep tended to begin meals later, eat for a longer time, skip meals more frequently, and watch TV at meals, not only at breakfast but also at lunch and dinner. The midpoint of sleep is significantly associated with dietary intake of certain nutrients and foods and other dietary behaviors in young Japanese women. This finding may contribute to consider the relationships between chronotype and dietary intakes and behaviors.
    Sleep Medicine 02/2011; 12(3):289-94. DOI:10.1016/j.sleep.2010.09.012 · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to food service establishments is considered to encourage consumption and contribute to poorer diet quality, and hence adverse health profiles. However, empirical verification of these links remains rare, particularly in young adults and non-Western populations. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that neighborhood restaurant availability and frequency of eating out are associated with unfavorable patterns of dietary intake and thus possibly higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in young Japanese women. The subjects were 989 female Japanese dietetic students 18 to 22 y of age. Dietary intake and frequency of eating out (i.e., consumption of commercially prepared meals) during the preceding month were assessed using a comprehensive, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Neighborhood restaurant availability was defined as the number of restaurants within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence (i.e., full-service restaurants, limited-service restaurants, and cafeterias). Increasing frequency of eating out was associated with higher intake of meat, confectionery and bread, and dietary fat, lower intake of fruit and vegetables, rice, and dietary fiber, and higher dietary energy density. However, neighborhood restaurant availability was not associated with either the frequency of eating out or any of the dietary variables examined. Further, frequency of eating out and neighborhood restaurant availability were not associated with BMI or waist circumference. In conclusion, although frequency of eating out was positively associated with unfavorable dietary intake patterns in a group of young Japanese women, neighborhood restaurant availability was not associated with frequency of eating out or dietary intake.
    Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 01/2011; 57(1):87-94. DOI:10.3177/jnsv.57.87 · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies on the relationship of local food environment with residents' diets have relied exclusively on self-reported information on diet, producing inconsistent results. Evaluation of dietary intake using biomarkers may obviate the biases inherent to the use of self-reported dietary information. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighbourhood food store availability and 24 h urinary Na and K excretion. The subjects were 904 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Neighbourhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence. Urinary Na and K excretion and the ratio of urinary Na to K were estimated from a single 24 h urine sample. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, neighbourhood availability of confectionery stores/bakeries was inversely associated with urinary K, and was positively associated with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively). Neighbourhood availability of rice stores showed an independent inverse association with urinary K (P for trend = 0.03), whereas neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores conversely showed an independent positive association with this variable (P for trend = 0.03). Furthermore, neighbourhood availability of fruit/vegetable stores showed an independent inverse association with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0.049). In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores and fruit/vegetable stores and decreasing availability of confectionery stores/bakeries and rice stores were associated with favourable profiles of 24 h urinary K (and Na) excretion.
    The British journal of nutrition 10/2010; 104(7):1043-50. DOI:10.1017/S0007114510001650 · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The affordability of food is considered as an important factor influencing people's diet and hence health status. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that neighborhood food store availability is associated with some aspects of dietary intake and thus possibly with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in young Japanese women. Subjects were 989 female Japanese dietetic students 18 to 22 years of age. Neighborhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence (meat stores, fish stores, fruit and vegetable stores, confectionery stores/bakeries, rice stores, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores). Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet history questionnaire. No association was seen between any measure of neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, except for a positive association between confectionery and bread availability (based on confectionery stores/bakeries, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores) and intake of these items (P for trend = .02). Further, no association was seen for BMI or waist circumference, except for an inverse relationship between availability of convenience stores and BMI and a positive relationship between store availability for meat (meat stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and fish (fish stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and waist circumference. In conclusion, this study of young Japanese women found no meaningful association between neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, BMI, or waist circumference, with the exception of a positive relationship between availability and intake for confectionery and bread.
    Nutrition research 08/2010; 30(8):565-73. DOI:10.1016/j.nutres.2010.08.002 · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies in Western populations have linked caffeine intake with health status. While detailed dietary assessment studies in these populations have shown that the main contributors to caffeine intake are coffee and tea, the wide consumption of Japanese and Chinese teas in Japan suggests that sources of intake in Japan may differ from those in Western populations. Among these teas, moreover, caffeine content varies widely among the different forms consumed (brewed, canned or bottled), suggesting the need for detailed dietary assessment in estimating intake in Japanese populations. Here, because a caffeine composition database or data obtained from detailed dietary assessment have not been available, we developed a database for caffeine content in Japanese foods and beverages, and then used it to estimate intake in a Japanese population. The caffeine food composition database was developed using analytic values from the literature, 16 d weighed diet records were collected, and caffeine intake was estimated from the 16 d weighed diet records. Four areas in Japan, Osaka (Osaka City), Okinawa (Ginowan City), Nagano (Matsumoto City) and Tottori (Kurayoshi City), between November 2002 and September 2003. Two hundred and thirty Japanese adults aged 30-69 years. Mean caffeine intake was 256.2 mg/d for women and 268.3 mg/d for men. The major contributors to intake were Japanese and Chinese teas and coffee (47 % each). Caffeine intake above 400 mg/d, suggested in reviews to possibly have negative health effects, was seen in 11 % of women and 15 % of men. In this Japanese population, caffeine intake was comparable to the estimated values reported in Western populations.
    Public Health Nutrition 05/2010; 13(5):663-72. DOI:10.1017/S1368980009992023 · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An increasing number of studies in Western countries have shown that living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with unfavorable dietary intake patterns and health status. However, information on such neighborhood socioeconomic differences in diet and health among different cultural settings, including Japan, is limited. This cross-sectional study examined the association of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) with dietary intake and a summary score of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in a group of young Japanese women. Subjects were 1081 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 22 y residing in 295 municipalities in Japan. Neighborhood SES index was defined by seven municipal-level variables, namely unemployment, household overcrowding, poverty, education, income, home ownership, and vulnerable group, with an increasing index signifying increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet-history questionnaire. Measurements of body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, and insulin were combined into an IRS score, with an increasing score signifying increasing levels of components of the IRS. Neighborhood SES index was not associated with most of the dietary variables, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, or glucose. However, neighborhood SES index was significantly positively associated with systolic blood pressure, insulin, and IRS score, after adjustment for potential confounding or mediating factors, including household SES, dietary, and lifestyle factors. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with unfavorable profiles of the IRS score, but not dietary intake, in a group of young Japanese women.
    Nutrition 05/2010; 26(5):508-14. DOI:10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.025 · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan do not include information on trans fatty acids. Previous studies estimating trans fatty acid intake among Japanese have limitations regarding the databases utilized and diet assessment methodologies. We developed a comprehensive database of trans fatty acid food composition, and used this database to estimate intake among a Japanese population. The database was developed using analytic values from the literature and nutrient analysis software encompassing foods in the US, as well as values estimated from recipes or nutrient compositions. We collected 16-day diet records from 225 adults aged 30 to 69 years living in 4 areas of Japan. Trans fatty acid intake was estimated based on the database and the 16-day diet records. Mean total fat and trans fatty acid intake was 56.9 g/day (27.7% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.8% total energy), respectively, for women and 66.8 g/day (25.5% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.7% total energy) for men. Trans fatty acid intake accounted for greater than 1% of total energy intake, which is the maximum recommended according to the World Health Organization, in 24.4% of women and 5.7% of men, and was particularly high among women living in urban areas and those aged 30-49 years. The largest contributors to trans fatty acid intake were confectionaries in women and fats and oils in men. Although mean trans fatty acid intake was below the maximum recommended intake of the World Health Organization, intake among subgroups was of concern. Further public health efforts to reduce trans fatty acid intake should be encouraged.
    Journal of Epidemiology 03/2010; 20(2):119-27. DOI:10.2188/jea.JE20090080 · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Information on nutritional adequacy and inadequacy of dietary patterns is useful when making practical dietary recommendations. We examined nutritional inadequacy of dietary patterns among 3756 Japanese female dietetic students aged 18-20 years. Diet was assessed with a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ). Dietary patterns were determined from intakes of 33 food groups summarized from 147 foods assessed with DHQ, by cluster analysis. Nutritional inadequacy for the selected 21 nutrients in each dietary pattern was examined using the reference values given in the Dietary Reference Intakes for the Japanese (DRIs) as the gold standard. Four dietary patterns identified were labeled 'fish and vegetables' (n=697), 'meat and eggs' (n=1008), 'rice' (n=1041), and 'bread and confectionaries' (n=1010) patterns. The 'fish and vegetables' pattern, characterized by high intakes of vegetables, potatoes, pulses, fruits, fish, and dairy products, showed significantly the lowest percentage of subjects with inadequate intakes for 15 nutrients, except for the highest prevalence in sodium. In contrast, 'bread and confectionaries' pattern, characterized by high intakes of bread, confectionaries, and soft drinks, showed the highest prevalence of inadequate intakes for nine nutrients. The median number of nutrients not meeting the DRIs as a marker of overall nutritional inadequacy was five in 'fish and vegetables' pattern. It was significantly lower than nine both in 'meat and eggs' and 'rice', and 10 in 'bread and confectionaries' patterns (p<0.001). A dietary pattern high in vegetables, fruits, fish, and some others showed better profile of nutritional adequacy except for sodium in young Japanese women.
    Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/2010; 19(4):555-63. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Information on the relationship of neighborhood characteristics to objective indicators of dietary intake is extremely limited. The aim of this observational cross-sectional study was to examine the association between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and 24-hour urinary excretion of sodium and potassium in a population with a high ratio of urinary sodium to potassium. Subjects were 1,032 female Japanese dietetics students aged 18 to 22 years, residing in 293 municipalities in Japan. Neighborhood SES index was defined by seven municipal-level variables, namely unemployment, household overcrowding, poverty, education, income, home ownership, and vulnerable groups, with an increasing index signifying increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Urinary excretion of sodium and potassium was estimated from a single 24-hour urine sample. Neighborhood SES index was not significantly associated with 24-hour urinary excretion of sodium (mean value for each quartile of neighborhood SES: 133.5, 135.2, 126.5, and 141.7 mmol/day, respectively; P for trend 0.10) or potassium (mean value for each quartile: 43.5, 42.2, 38.4, and 42.5 mmol/day, respectively; P for trend 0.44). However, neighborhood SES index was significantly positively associated with the ratio of 24-hour urinary sodium to potassium (mean value for each quartile: 3.14, 3.28, 3.37, and 3.41, respectively; P for trend 0.03). This significant association remained after adjustment for household SES variables (mean value for each quartile: 3.15, 3.35, 3.29, and 3.41, respectively; P for trend 0.04). Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with higher ratio of 24-hour urinary sodium to potassium in young Japanese women.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 10/2009; 109(9):1606-11. DOI:10.1016/j.jada.2009.06.391 · 3.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the association of nutrient intake with Fe deficiency with regard to lifestyle factors and health condition in young Japanese women. Uniquely among developed countries, dietary habits render Japanese populations vulnerable to Fe deficiency, owing to their relatively low intake of Fe and high intake of Fe absorption inhibitors, such as green tea and soyabeans. A cross-sectional study. The subjects were 1019 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-25 years. Dietary habits during the preceding month were assessed using a previously validated, self-administered, diet history questionnaire. Blood analysis was performed to assess body Fe status. Subjects were categorized with Fe deficiency when their serum ferritin levels were <12 ng/ml. Twenty-nine dietary variables, i.e. intakes of energy, sixteen nutrients including Fe and twelve food groups, were analysed using multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for possible confounders. Of the subjects, 24.5% were categorized with Fe deficiency. However, no dietary factors assessed were significantly associated with Fe deficiency. The risk of Fe deficiency was significantly lower in women with infrequent or no menstrual cycles than in those with regular cycles (OR = 0.58; 95% CI 0.34, 1.00) and significantly higher in women with heavy menstrual flow than in women with average flow, albeit that these were self-reported (OR = 1.83; 95% CI 1.35, 2.48). These results suggest that dietary habits, including Fe intake, do not significantly correlate with Fe deficiency among young Japanese women.
    Public Health Nutrition 09/2009; 12(9):1373-83. DOI:10.1017/S1368980008004072 · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined cross-sectional associations of total, hydrogenated, and natural trans fatty acid intake with selected metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women. Subjects were 1136 Japanese female dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Associations between trans fatty acid intake and metabolic risk factors were examined with multivariate linear regression analysis, with control for potential covariates. Dietary covariates included intake of energy, total fat, and saturated fatty acids (model 1); monounsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 2); and polyunsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 3). Mean (standard deviation) total trans fatty acid intake was 0.90% (0.30%) of total energy. Hydrogenated trans fatty acids contributed 77% of total trans fatty acid intake. Total trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated with waist circumference, triacylglycerol, and glycated hemoglobin, except in the analysis of triacylglycerol with adjustment for monounsaturated fatty acids. No associations were found between total trans fatty acid intake and body mass index, cholesterol, or glucose. Hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated only with waist circumference and glycated hemoglobin. No association was observed for natural trans fatty acid intake. hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was positively associated with several metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women with relatively low intake.
    Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 09/2009; 18(3):359-71. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the relationship of dietary cost to health status. The present cross-sectional study examined the association between the monetary cost of dietary energy (Japanese yen/4184 kJ) and several metabolic risk factors. Monetary cost of dietary energy was estimated based on dietary intake assessed by a self-administered diet history questionnaire and retail food prices. Body height and weight, from which BMI was derived, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured and fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical measurements. A total of fifteen universities and colleges in Japan. A total of 1136 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, monetary cost of dietary energy was significantly and negatively associated with BMI (P for trend = 0.0024). Monetary cost of dietary energy also showed a significant and negative association with waist circumference independently of potential confounding factors, including BMI (P for trend = 0.0003). No significant associations were observed for other metabolic risk factors examined (P for trend = 0.10-0.88). The monetary cost of dietary energy was independently and negatively associated with both BMI and waist circumference, but not other metabolic risk factors, in a group of young Japanese women.
    Public Health Nutrition 08/2009; 12(8):1092-8. DOI:10.1017/S1368980008004266 · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An increasing number of studies conducted in Western countries have shown that living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with unfavorable dietary intake patterns and an unfavorable health status. However, information on such neighborhood socioeconomic differences in diet and health among different cultural settings, including Japan, is absolutely lacking. This cross-sectional study examined the association of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) with dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in a group of young Japanese women. Subjects were 3892 female Japanese dietetic students 18-20 y of age from 53 institutions, residing in 1033 municipalities in 47 prefectures in Japan. Neighborhood SES index was defined by seven municipal-level variables, namely unemployment, household overcrowding, poverty, education, income, home ownership, and vulnerable groups, with an increasing index signifying increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet history questionnaire. BMI was computed from self-reported body weight and height. Neighborhood SES index was not materially associated with most of the dietary variables. However, neighborhood SES index was positively associated with BMI, with significance (P for trend=0.020). This significant association remained after adjustment for potential confounding or mediating factors including household SES, dietary, other lifestyle, and geographic factors (P for trend=0.037). Although no material association was seen between neighborhood SES and dietary intake, increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was independently associated with increasing BMI in a group of young Japanese women.
    Nutrition 05/2009; 25(7-8):745-52. DOI:10.1016/j.nut.2009.01.010 · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Information on the association between the local food environment and the diet of individuals is limited, particularly in settings with high population density and, hence, high food-store density, such as Japan. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighborhood food-store availability and individual food intake in a group of young Japanese women. Participants were 990 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Neighborhood food-store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 1-km mesh-block of residence, derived from the census of commerce. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet-history questionnaire. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, including household socioeconomic status, geographic variables, and the frequency of eating out, neighborhood store availability for confectioneries and bread (based on confectionery stores/bakeries, supermarkets, and grocery and convenience stores) was significantly positively associated with the intake of confectioneries and bread. No significant independent association was seen between neighborhood store availability for the other foods examined, including meat (meat stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), fish (fish stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), fruit and vegetables (fruit/vegetable stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), and rice (rice stores, supermarkets, and grocery and convenience stores) with intake of each food. In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighborhood store availability for confectioneries and bread was independently associated with higher intake of confectioneries and bread. In contrast, no association between availability and intake was seen for meat, fish, fruit and vegetables, or rice.
    Nutrition 03/2009; 25(6):640-6. DOI:10.1016/j.nut.2009.01.002 · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • 01/2009; 67(3):128-140. DOI:10.5264/eiyogakuzashi.67.128
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    ABSTRACT: Unsweetened traditional Japanese tea has long been the main beverage consumed in Japan, with soft drinks only recently forming a part of people's diets. Evidence suggests an association between soft drink intake and poor diet quality among youth in the United States. The association is not yet fully examined in the population with relatively low intake level of soft drinks such as the current Japanese population. To investigate the association of soft drink intake with dietary intake among young Japanese women. A cross-sectional survey assessed dietary intake using a validated, self-administered, diet history questionnaire. Female dietetics students aged 18 to 20 years (n=3,931) in April 2005 in Japan. Multivariate linear regression analyses examined the relationship of soft drink intake with that of foods, beverages, energy, and nutrients. Mean+/-standard deviation soft drink intake was 70.6+/-93.0 g/1,000 kcal. Soft drink intake was significantly associated positively with intake of confection, fat and oil, noodles, 100% vegetable and fruit juices, diet soft drinks, energy, and carbohydrates and negatively with intake of vegetables, fruits, pulses, fish and shellfish, rice, eggs, potatoes, milk, coffee and black tea, traditional Japanese tea, protein, dietary fiber, cholesterol, and most of the micronutrients examined. Not only among Western populations, but also among non-Western populations, soft drink intake may be an important factor to consider in evaluating overall dietary intake and diet quality.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 01/2009; 108(12):1997-2004. DOI:10.1016/j.jada.2008.09.033 · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the relation between the activities of certain enzymes involved in endogenous fatty acid synthesis and metabolic risk factors, particularly in young adults and non-Western populations. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the associations between estimated desaturase and elongase activities and metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women. The subjects were 640 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 22 years. Body height and weight, from which body mass index (BMI) was derived, waist circumference, and blood pressure were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical and fatty acid measurements. Desaturase and elongase enzyme activities were estimated as the ratio of product to precursor of individual fatty acids in serum lipids. delta-9 desaturase activity was positively associated with BMI, diastolic blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerol and was negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P <or= .019). delta-6 desaturase activity showed positive associations with BMI, systolic blood pressure, triacylglycerol, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P <or= .045). delta-5 desaturase activity showed independent negative associations with BMI, systolic blood pressure, triacylglycerol, insulin, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P <or= .007). Elongase activity was associated negatively with BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and triacylglycerol and was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P <or= .026). In conclusion, increased estimates of delta-9 and delta-6 desaturase activity and decreased estimates of delta-5 desaturase and elongase activity were associated with adverse profiles for several metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women.
    Nutrition research 12/2008; 28(12):816-24. DOI:10.1016/j.nutres.2008.08.009 · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All previous studies on monetary diet cost have examined the relationship of monetary cost of self-reported diet to self-reported, rather than biomarker-based, estimates of dietary intake. The present cross-sectional study examined the association between monetary costs of self-reported diet and biomarker-based estimates of nutrient intake. Monetary diet cost (Japanese yen/1000 kJ) was calculated based on dietary intake information from a self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire using retail food prices. Biomarker-based estimates of nutrient intake (percentage of energy for protein and mg/1000 kJ for K and Na) were estimated based on 24 h urinary excretion and estimated energy expenditure. A total of fifteen universities and colleges in Japan. A total of 1046 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Total monetary diet cost showed a significant positive association with biomarker-based estimates of protein, K and Na. Vegetables and fish were not only the main contributors to total monetary diet cost (16.4 % and 15.5 %, respectively) but also were relatively strongly correlated with total monetary diet cost (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.70 and 0.68, respectively). Monetary cost of vegetables was significantly positively associated with all three nutrients, while that of fish showed a significant and positive association only with protein. Total monetary cost of self-reported diet was positively associated with biomarker-based estimates of protein, K and Na intake in young Japanese women, and appeared mainly to be explained by the monetary costs of vegetables and fish.
    Public Health Nutrition 12/2008; 12(8):1290-7. DOI:10.1017/S1368980008003923 · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates may increase brain serotonin, which in turn acts to alleviate premenstrual symptoms, because, although the main determinant of brain serotonin concentration is a high plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids, a high-GI diet has been shown to increase this ratio. In this observational cross-sectional study, we investigated associations between dietary GI and other dietary carbohydrates and premenstrual symptoms. Subjects were 640 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Dietary carbohydrates were assessed using a validated, self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Menstrual cycle symptoms were assessed using the retrospective version of the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Independent associations of dietary GI and glycemic load and intake of available carbohydrate and dietary fiber with the MDQ total score and subscale scores (pain, concentration, behavioral change, autonomic reactions, water retention, and negative affect) in the premenstrual phase (expressed as percentages relative to those in the intermenstrual phase) were examined. Dietary GI was independently inversely associated with total MDQ score in the premenstrual phase (P for trend = 0.02). Dietary GI also showed independent and inverse associations with several MDQ subscale scores in the premenstrual phase, including concentration, autonomic reactions, and water retention (P for trend < 0.05). Conversely, dietary glycemic load and intake of available carbohydrate and dietary fiber were not associated with any of the MDQ scores in the premenstrual phase. Dietary GI was independently associated with decreased premenstrual symptoms in a group of young Japanese women.
    Nutrition 07/2008; 24(6):554-61. DOI:10.1016/j.nut.2008.02.003 · 3.05 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

562 Citations
103.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2011
    • Wayo Women's University
      Tiba, Chiba, Japan
  • 2007–2009
    • National Institute of Health and Nutrition
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Kagawa Nutrition University
      Saitama, Saitama, Japan
  • 2006
    • National Cancer Center, Japan
      • Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2002
    • National Cancer Research Institute
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom