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Publications (7)12.29 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The effect of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) on the bone status of asthmatic patients is still uncertain, because it can differ by race and because there have been few cases in Japan. In this study, the bone status of ICS users with asthma was evaluated in an actual clinical setting in Japan. METHODS: In 7 participating hospitals, ICS users with asthma and control subjects were age- and gender-matched and recruited into this study. To assess bone status, ultrasound measurements of each individual's calcaneus were made using an AOS-100. The ratio of the osteo sono-assessment index (OSI) to the average OSI corrected for age and gender was denoted as %OSI and used for quantitative assessment. The second %OSI measurement was performed 6 months after the first %OSI one. During the study period, individual treatment remained unchanged. Results: There were no significant differences in the 1st and 2nd %OSI between the ICS users and control subjects. However, the 2nd %OSI significantly decreased compared with 1st %OSI in female ICS users, although there were no significant changes in the male and female control subjects and male ICS users. Conclusions: The 6 month management of asthma in the actual clinical setting, including regular ICS use, might have a harmful influence on the bone status of female asthmatic patients. It may be necessary to manage and treat female patients for potent corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, although further analyses of bone status in asthma patient ICS users will be required.
    Allergology International 06/2011; 60(4):459-65.
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    ABSTRACT: Prevention of deaths due to asthma is one of the most important issues in asthma management. However, there are few epidemiological studies of asthma deaths in Japan. Over an 8-week period in Niigata Prefecture, Japan, a questionnaire on asthma control and emergency episodes was administered to adult asthmatic patients. A questionnaire was also given to the patients' physicians to obtain further clinical information. Patients who became unconscious during episodes of asthma, or who required intubation and ventilation, were allocated to a near-fatal asthma group (NFA). Patients who did not fulfill these criteria were allocated to the non-NFA group. The NFA group was divided into two subgroups, based on the date of their last NFA episode (old NFA>or= 5 years and recent NFA<4 years). Characteristic features of the NFA group included severe disease (23.1%vs 7.6%) with more aggressive patient management, including inhaled corticosteroid use (84.3%vs 72.0%). Multiple regression analysis confirmed that aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) was strongly associated with NFA. There was no difference in the incidence of AIA between the recent and old NFA patients. This suggests the incidence of AIA in NFA did not improve over time. A history of AIA may be a useful indicator of potential NFA and allow preventative methods to be introduced. It is therefore important to obtain a history of AIA and to be aware of the risk of NSAID administration to these patients.
    Respirology 09/2005; 10(4):477-84. · 2.78 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Psychosomatic Research 01/2003; 55(2):168-169. · 3.27 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Psychosomatic Research 01/2003; 55(2):169-169. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the cultural differences in the role of somatosensory amplification in Japan and North America, we re-examined the role of psychological amplification of objective physical symptoms, as measured by the Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS), in 82 Japanese patients with upper-respiratory tract infections. Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). We determined the association among continuous variables using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Next, we used multiple regression analysis and selected all symptoms as independent variables. The SSAS was significantly associated with all somatic symptoms. It was also closely related to discomfort, but the SSAS was not significantly correlated with either anxiety or depression. All somatic symptoms were not significantly correlated with the objective physical findings. Multiple regression analyses indicated that amplification by SSAS was a statistically significant predictor of the patient's somatic symptoms and discomfort. The objective findings did not significantly predict the patient's symptoms. Our study provides some empirical evidence regarding psychological amplification of objective physical symptoms, as measured by SSAS, in Japanese patients with upper-respiratory tract infections. Our findings suggest that there is no difference in the role of amplification of bodily sensations between Japanese and North Americans.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 05/2002; 24(3):172-5. · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nocturnal worsening is an important problem in asthma management. We evaluated the efficacy of two sustained-released theophylline formulations, administered twice-a-day (TD) and once-a-day (UP). In 20 asthmatic patients with low peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) in the morning (< 80% of predicted) administered TD (mean dose 475 mg/day) for 2 weeks, we evaluated PEF, diurnal variability of PEF, symptom score, results of spirometry and serum theophylline concentration (STC) and then changed theophylline, from TD to UP (mean dose 470 mg/day) for 2-4 weeks. PEF in the morning was higher during the UP period (mean +/- SD: 335 +/- 110 L/min) than during the TD period (mean +/- SD: 308 +/- 95 L/min) (p < 0.05), and diurnal variabirity of PEF was lower during the UP period (17.1 +/- 8.0%) than TD period (22.9 +/- 13.4%) (p < 0.05). However, there were no changes in PEF at night or daytime, symptom score, spirometry parameters or STC during the study period. The improvement in morning PEF observed in this study was consistent with the differences in pharmacokinetics between the two theophylline formulations. Morning PEF was increased during the UP period, probably because STC in the early morning during the UP period was higher than STC during the TD period.
    Arerugī = [Allergy] 07/2000; 49(7):593-9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nocturnal worsening is an important problem in asthma management. We evaluated the efficacy of two sustained-released theophylline formulations, administered twice-a-day (TD) and once-a-day (UP). In 20 asthmatic patients with low peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) in the morning (< 80% of predicted) administered TD (mean dose 475 mg/day) for 2 weeks, we evaluated PEF, diurnal variability of PEF, symptom score, results of spirometry and serum theophylline concentration (STC) and then changed theophylline, from TD to UP (mean dose 470 mg/day) for 2-4 weeks. PEF in the morning was higher during the UP period (mean +/- SD: 335 +/- 110 L/min) than during the TD period (mean +/- SD: 308 +/- 95 L/min) (p < 0.05), and diurnal variabirity of PEF was lower during the UP period (17.1 +/- 8.0%) than TD period (22.9 +/- 13.4%) (p < 0.05). However, there were no changes in PEF at night or daytime, symptom score, spirometry parameters or STC during the study period. The improvement in morning PEF observed in this study was consistent with the differences in pharmacokinetics between the two theophylline formulations. Morning PEF was increased during the UP period, probably because STC in the early morning during the UP period was higher than STC during the TD period.
    Arerugī = [Allergy] 07/2000; 49(7):593-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The Asthma Control Test (ACT) is frequently used for the evaluation of asthma control in clini-cal care setting because it does not require the use of pulmonary function tests, which can be difficult for gen-eral practitioners to use. However, few large-scale studies have investigated the efficacy of the Japanese ver-sion ACT (J-ACT) in actual use during clinical care. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of the J-ACT in a clinical care setting. Using data from a 2008 questionnaire survey including the J-ACT by the Niigata Asthma Treatment Study Group, we com-pared the ACT scores of 2233 patients with respect to multiple parameters, including the severity by Japanese Society of Allergology and the attack frequency. Using the definition of asthma control partially referred to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines from the survey data, the accuracy screening and determination of optimal ACT cutpoints were performed by retrospective analysis. Results: Cronbach's α for the J-ACT was 0.785. Patients with more severe asthma and more frequent asthma attacks had lower ACT scores than did patients with less severe, less frequent attacks. The optimal ACT cut-points were 24 for the controlled asthma and 20 for the uncontrolled asthma. Conclusions: Our study, the first large-scale investigation of the efficacy of the J-ACT, determined that this evaluation tool is highly efficacious in establishing the level of asthma control. However, the determination of accurate cutpoints for the J-ACT will require more clear definitions of asthma control in future prospective stud-ies.