L Ferrari

Universita degli studi di Ferrara, Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (45)126.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Grade IV chemotherapy toxicity is defined as absolute neutrophil count <500/microL. The nadir is considered as the lowest neutrophil number following chemotherapy, and generally is not expected before the 7th day from the start of chemotherapy. The usual prophylactic dose of rHu-G-CSF (Filgrastim) is 300 microg/day, starting 24-48 h after chemotherapy until hematological recovery. However, individual patient response is largely variable, so that rHu-G-CSF doses can be different. The aim of this study was to verify if peripheral blood automated flow cytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis may be helpful in predicting the individual response and saving rHu-G-CSF. During Grade IV neutropenia, blood counts from 30 cancer patients were analyzed daily by ADVIA 120 automated flow cytochemistry analyzer and by Facscalibur flow cytometer till the nadir. "Large unstained cells" (LUCs), myeloperoxidase index (MPXI), blasts, and various cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood were studied. At nadir rHu-G-CSF was started and 81 chemotherapy cycles were analyzed. Cycles were stratified according to their number and to two dose-levels of rHuG-CSF needed to recovery (300-600 vs. 900-1200 microg) and analyzed in relation to mean values of MPXI and mean absolute number of LUCs in the nadir phase. The linear regressions of LUCs % over time in relation to two dose-levels of rHu-G-CSF and uni-multivariate analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations, CD34(+) cells, MPXI, and blasts were also performed. In the nadir phase, the increase of MPXI above the upper limit of normality (>10; median 27.7), characterized a slow hematological recovery. MPXI levels were directly related to the cycle number and inversely related to the absolute number of LUCs and CD34(+)/CD45(+) cells. A faster hematological recovery was associated with a higher LUC increase per day (0.56% vs. 0.25%), higher blast (median 36.7/microL vs. 19.5/microL) and CD34(+)/CD45(+) cell (median 2.2/microL vs. 0.82/microL) counts. Our study showed that some biological indicators such as MPXI, LUCs, blasts, and CD34(+)/CD45(+) cells may be of clinical relevance in predicting individual hematological response to rHu-G-CSF. Special attention should be paid when nadir MPXI exceeds the upper limit of normality because the hematological recovery may be delayed.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 05/2009; 76(5):328-33. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biologic and clinical interest in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has risen over the last years, mainly due to their immunosuppressive properties. In this study, we investigated the basis of immunomodulant possible variability using hMSC from different sources (amniotic membrane, chorion, and bone marrow from either healthy subjects or patients with hematological malignancies, HM) and having discordant positivity for several immunological markers. The CD90+ hMSC reduced lymphoproliferative response in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) via sHLA-G and IL-10 up-modulation. On the contrary, hMSC showing a significantly lower expression for CD90 antigen, elicited a lymphoproliferative allogeneic response in PHA/PBMCs without any increase in soluble HLA-G and IL-10 levels. These data seems to suggest that CD90 molecule may be considered a novel predictive marker for hMSC inhibitory ability, and might cooperate with HLA-G molecule in regulating suppressive versus stimulatory properties of hMSC. These results may have clinical implication in either transplantation or in regenerative medicine fields.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 12/2008; 76(3):225-30. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is still controversy regarding the role of circulating endothelial and progenitor cells (CECs/CEPs) in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Using a sequential Boolean gating strategy based on a 4-color flow cytometric protocol, an increased number of CD31(pos)/CD184(pos)(CXCR4)/CD34(pos)/CD45(pos) and CD31(pos)/CD117(pos) (c-kit-R) /CD34(pos)/ CD45(pos) hematopoietic circulating progenitor cells (HCPCs) was detected in SSc patients compared with healthy subjects. In SSc, no circulating mature and progenitor endothelial cells were observed, while an enhanced generation of erythroid progenitor cells was found to be correlated with the presence of CD117+ HCPCs. The presence of freshly detected CXCR4posHCPC was correlated either to the in vitro cultured spindle-shaped endothelial like cells (SELC) with an endo/myelomonocytic profile or to SDF-1 and VEGF serum level. These data are related to more fibrotic clinical features of the disease, thus supporting a possible role of these cells in fibrosis.
    Haematologica 07/2008; 93(8):1233-7. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) phenotypic and functional subsets in response to environmental stimuli. The strategy used in this study focused on defining hMSC functional subpopulations based in particular on their Thy-1 (CD90) antigen (Ag) surface expression. The effect of different in vitro microenvironmental conditions on the isolation and expansion of bone marrow-derived (BM) hMSC from hematologic malignancies (HM) and normal samples (NS) was assayed. hMSC clonogenic and differentiation potential, phenotypic profile and long-term capacity to sustain in vitro hemopoiesis were considered in relation to the different expansion protocols. The results showed that angiogenic supplements used in combination with low serum content gave rise to the appearance of Thy-1(-) HM-MSC with high proliferative potential, capable of restoring the typical HM stromal impairment. The expression of the CD271 was partially maintained. We further report an enhancement towards the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity by the Thy-1(-) HM-MSC subset. Despite the angiogenic treatment, the Thy-1(-) MSC stopped short of full endothelial differentiation. In this paper we provide evidence that in vitro angiogenic stimuli generate HM-MSC lacking CD90 Ag expression. The Thy-1(-) MSC subset is characterized by peculiar functional and phenotypic characteristics, thus supporting the role played by the microenvironment in selecting particular hMSC subsets maintaining normal tissue homeostasis or inducing pathologic processes.
    Cytotherapy 02/2008; 10(1):69-82. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    Leukemia 03/2007; 21(2):378-81. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The immunophenotypic analysis of ex vivo-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has so far been confined to single or dual staining analysis in normal subjects. In this study, using a four-color cytofluorimetric protocol, we demonstrated that cultured MSC derived from the bone marrow of patients with hematologic malignancies showed alterations in the expression of CD105, CD90, CD184, and HLA-DR molecules. The decrease in the percentage of CD105+ and CD90+ MSC correlated with an increased bone marrow angiogenesis. This paper provides evidence that multiparametric flow cytometry is essential for the establishment of a standardized protocol to identify various MSCs subsets and aberrant phenotypes.
    Haematologica 04/2006; 91(3):364-8. · 5.94 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery - J CRANIO MAXILLOFAC SURG. 01/2006; 34:89-89.
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    ABSTRACT: Polycystin-2 (PC2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, mutated in 10-15% of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients, is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel present in kidney epithelia and other tissues. As PC2 was found expressed in B-lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) and Ca2+ signaling pathways are important regulators of B cell function activities, we investigated whether PC2 plays some role in B-LCLs. In LCLs, PC2 was found mainly in ER membranes but ~8 times less than in kidney HEK293 cells. The same reductions were found in PKD2 and PKD1 RNA; thus, PKD genes maintained, in LCLs, the same reciprocal proportion as they do in kidney cells. In LCLs obtained from subjects carrying PKD2 mutations (PKD2-LCLs) and showing reduced PC2 levels, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations evoked by platelet-activating factor (PAF), were significantly lower than in non-PKD-LCLs. This reduction was also found in PKD1-LCLs but without PC2 reductions. Likewise, cell proliferation, which is controlled by Ca2+, was reduced in PKD2- and PKD1-LCLs. Moreover, in LCLs with PKD2 nonsense mutations, aminoglycoside antibiotics reduced the PC2 defect by promoting readthrough of stop codons. Therefore, PC2 and PC1 are functionally expressed in LCLs, which provide a model, easily obtainable from ADPKD patients, to study PKD gene expression and function.
    The FASEB Journal 06/2004; 18(7):884-6. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe an uncommon case of acute leukemia in which leukemic blasts expressed myeloid antigens and cyCD79alpha molecule. In this 49-year old male patient, two distinct blast populations were detected in peripheral blood and bone marrow samples: one of small size resembling lymphoblasts and another with pink cytoplasmic granules resembling myeloblasts. Cytochemical reaction for myeloperoxidase was negative in both cell types. Conventional cytogenetic analysis showed a normal karyotype (46 XY) in all metaphases studied, while gene rearrangement analysis by seminested PCR of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Ig-H) and T-cell-gamma chain (TCR-gamma) receptor, showed a germline configuration of the TCR and clonal rearrangement of Ig-H chain genes. Multicolour cytofluorimetric analysis showed that bone marrow and peripheral blood blasts expressed CD19, CD79alpha bright, CD22 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) as lymphoid markers, CD13, CD117, CD15 as myeloid markers, CD34, HLA-DR as stem cell markers. CD33 myeloid antigen was expressed by 50% of the blastic population. No differences in the immunophenotypic profile were detected in the two blast populations which were identified by morphology. According to EGIL (European Group of Immunological Classification of Leukemias) and WHO (World Health Organization) criteria, a diagnosis of biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) was made. The patient was treated with AML induction therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, but relapse free survival was 6 months. The patient died a few weeks later due to unresponsiveness to salvage chemotherapy regimens. We conclude that patients with BAL should have a risk stratification with treatment tailored to their immunophenotype and gene rearrangement profiles.
    Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents 01/2004; 18(3-4):387-91. · 5.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study three assays for the enumeration of CD34+ progenitors were compared: 1) a modified version of the Milan protocol, used in the standard dual-platform format; 2) a dual-platform version of the ISHAGE protocol; 3) the ProCOUNT software version 2.0/ProCOUNT kit. The assays were compared to validate the accuracy of CD34+ cell counts in mobilized peripheral blood (PB), apheresis products (AP), and cord blood (CB). The ProCOUNT protocol uses reference beads for absolute CD34+ cell counting, whereas CD34 counts by other techniques are derived from a separate leukocyte count performed by a hematology analyzer. A good correlation between the ISHAGE and ProCOUNT methods was obtained for estimation of CD34+ counts in PB (n=42 samples analyzed) and AP (n=35)--except for samples having a leukocyte count >25 x 10(9)/L or a CD34 count <0.0025 x 10(9)/L)--while a suboptimal correlation between the methods was observed for CB (n=30). The ProCOUNT system proved to be effective in reducing the variability in CD34+ cell counting and appeared to be useful for intralaboratory methodology standardization. The main disadvantage of the ProCOUNT assay was its inability to calculate CD34 counts in leukopenic samples and in CB samples showing a high erythroblast count. As far as the correlation with hematopoietic colonies is concerned, data collected from apheresis samples showed a good correlation between the three flow cytometry methods and colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) counts, confirming the value of the flow cytometric test as a real-time, truly predictive test to measure the hematopoietic potential of the graft. In summary, all methods are suitable for enumeration of most PB samples, while the single-platform methodology should be preferred for the analysis of AP and CB. We also found the dual-platform format of the ISHAGE method precise and accurate for the estimation of CD34+ cells from CB samples. Based on these data it can be concluded that the single-platform flow cytometry assay format should be the preferred approach for CD34+ stem cell enumeration in different types of samples.
    The International journal of biological markers 01/2002; 17(4):259-67. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents 01/2001; 15(1):86-9. · 5.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: So far several reports have described changes in the expression of surface antigens in progenitor cells and blasts following cryopreservation. However, there are no data on the effects of cryopreservation on the expression of the three CD34 epitope classes, and on their relationship with the clonogenic capacity of PBPC collected by leukapheresis. In order to analyze the effects of freezing/thawing procedures (Eth 80C storage for 3 months) and use of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the immunophenotype profile and colony production of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) in apheresis products derived from 20 patients with stage 0-III non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (nHL), a flow cytometry study was undertaken using different CD34 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) capable of recognizing the 3 epitope classes of CD34 molecule (class III: HPCA-2/FITC, HPCA-2/PE, 581/FITC, 581/PE; class II: Q-Bend 10/PE; class I: ICH3/PE, BI3C5-PE, Immu-133-PE). CD34 epitope expression was also analyzed in thawed CD34+ blasts obtained from 14 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), who were analyzed using a larger number (#17) of CD34 epitope class I, II, and III reactive MoAbs. Under our experimental conditions it was found that class III and class II CD34 epitopes (differentially resistant to enzymatic cleavage with neuraminidase, chymopapain and glycoprotease) are better preserved than class I epitope Eth sensitive to degradation Eth after cell exposure to cryoprotectant DMSO and the freezing- thawing procedures. Results further showed a concomitant decrease in class I CD34+ counts and in BFU-E colony production. A significant increase in CD34 antigen expression levels (i.e. antibody binding capacity, ABC) by cryopreserved cells stained with CD34 epitope class III, and class II reactive MoAbs was also documented, while no changes after cryopreservation were noted using class I-reactive MoAbs. The slight increase in the percentage of CD34+ cells detected after frozen storage was correlated to a concomitant decrease in the number of more mature myeloid cells (CD15+, CD13+, CD33+). Compared to pre-cryopreservation values, a slight reduction in class I CD34 epitope expression was also found in thawed CD34+ AML blasts. As far as the reduction of class I CD34 epitope is concerned, it may be hypothesized that the freezing procedure, use of DMSO, and/or lysis methodology may either damage a CD34 subset, or induce distinct alterations of the CD34 glycoprotein, possibly determining a reduction in their immunoreactivity with some CD34 MoAbs. In conclusion, this study has shown that exposure to the cryoprotectant DMSO and the freezing/thawing procedures modifies the distribution of CD34 epitopes as well as the clonogenic capacity of PBPCs from nHL patients, and CD34+ blasts from AML. These findings need to considered when selecting CD34 MoAbs for enumeration and positive selection of stem/progenitor cells for research and clinical purposes.
    Haematologica 12/1999; 84(11):969-77. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously shown that a subpopulation of cord/fetal red blood cells (RBC) binds rabbit IgG antibodies raised against cord RBC and absorbed on adult RBC (F-IgG), while control IgG, raised against and absorbed on adult RBC (A-IgG), fails to do so. In the present study, F-IgG maintained its binding to cord RBC surface antigens following absorption on spectrin but not after absorption on skeleton-stripped RBC membranes. Spectrin-absorbed F-IgG- but not A-IgG-affinity-purified material from cord RBC contained polypeptides with apparent MW of complement receptor 1 (CR1) allotypes. Moreover, on immunoblotting these polypeptides reacted with 125I-F-IgG as well as with 125I-anti-CR1 mAb, and binding of 125I-anti-CR1 mAb was inhibited by unlabelled F-IgG. In addition, cord RBC incubated with F-IgG prior to reaction with anti-CR1 showed decreased fluorescence intensity on flow cytometry. Taken together the results suggest that F-IgG binds to CR1 which shows increased expression/accessibility on a subpopulation of cord/fetal RBC.
    Acta Haematologica 01/1999; 100(3):123-9. · 0.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A quantitative analysis of expression levels of GM-CSF receptors was performed by flow cytometry in different disease categories, ie AML (n = 72), ALL (n = 18), and MDS (n = 12), as well as 12 healthy volunteers, using three different unconjugated GM-CSF/R monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) (HGM-CSFR (CD116), M5D12, 4B5F5), and appropriate standards. By using the reference HGM-CSFR McAb, in healthy subjects we found detectable levels of GM-CSF/R on blood monocytes (mean MESF (molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome)/cell: 36.1 x 10[3]), neutrophils (mean MESF/cell: 7.4 x 10[3]), bone marrow (BM) myelo-monocytic precursors (MESF range for the myeloid component, ie promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes: 11.7-40.5 x 10[3], and for the monocytic lineage: 25.7-69.2 x 10[3]), and in two distinct subsets of BM CD34+ progenitor cells (GM-CSF/R dim: 2.5 x 10[3] MESF/cell, GM-CSF/R bright (10% of the total number of CD34 cells: 22.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In these subjects, there was no correlation between the expression levels of GM-CSF/R and CFU (CFU-GM, CFU-GEMM, BFU-E) colony production. Among the AML samples, M5D12 McAb was positive in 33%, 4B5F5 McAb in 90%, and HGM-CSF/R McAb in 78% of the cases examined (range of MESF/cell for the HGM-CSFR McAb: 0.9 x 10[3]-106.7 x 10[3]). The highest MESF values were seen in the M5 FAB subvariety (mean: 39.4 x 10[3]), where all the patients tested (n = 20) showed a strong positivity for the HGM-CSFR McAb. On the contrary, all ALL samples were GM-CSF/R negative except in two patients, who displayed a dim GM-CSF/R positivity (My+ALL: 1.3 x 10[3] MESF/cell; pro-B ALL: 1.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In most (>70%) M1 FAB subtypes, GM-CSF/R+ blasts co-expressed CD34low, HLA-DRhigh, CD33, CD38 antigens, and had little or no capacity to form CFU-GM colonies. GM-CSF/R+ blasts from the M5 FAB category were also positive for CD14, CD11c, CD33 and CD87. Furthermore, the number of GM-CSF/R expressed by leukemic cells from five out of 72 (7%) AML patients was above the highest values seen in normal samples (>69.2 x 10[3] MESF/cell), allowing the possibility of using this marker for the monitoring of the minimal residual disease (MRD) in a subset of AML. Cell culture studies aimed at evaluating GM-CSF receptor modulation following AML blast exposure to rhGM-CSF showed two distinct patterns of response; in the first group (6/10 cases) rhGM-CSF down-modulated GM-CSF receptors, whereas in the second group (4/10 cases), rhGM-CSF treatment was associated with either an increase or no change in the number of GM-CSF/R. In conclusion, cellular GM-CSF/R expression was variable and ranged from undetectable (ALL and a minority of AML) to very high intensities in M5 AML, and were also documented in some M0 AML, thus suggesting the concept that GM-CSF/R detection may be of help in lineage assignment of undifferentiated forms. Since the number of GM-CSF/R on AML blasts may be modulated after GM-CSF treatment, it can be postulated that the clinical use of GM-CSF in this disease may be optimized by a dynamic analysis of the number and the affinity status of GM-CSF-R in blasts and normal hemopoietic cells.
    Leukemia 10/1997; 11(10):1700-10. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a direct one-color (fluorescein isothiocyanate; FITC) staining method with a Facscan flow cytometer, we evaluated the intracellular expression of two granular constituents of myeloid cells [myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lysozyme] on leukemic cells from 21 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 6 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three different permeabilization techniques were used [FACS Lysing Solution (FLy), B.Dis; Ortho-PermeaFix (OPF); Fix and Perm (F&P), Caltag] prior to monoclonal antibody (McAb) staining, in order to verify the specificity and the sensitivity of the three labelling methods towards the two model antigens. Peripheral blood cells from 15 healthy subjects and Ortho Absolute Control served as controls. Data were expressed as percentage of positivity, net fluorescence intensity, ratio between mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of positive cells and that of isotypic controls (P/N ratio; evaluated in both geometric and arithmetic scale), and, in 12 representatives cases (7 AML, 5 normal samples), in the form of both molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochromes (MESF) and antibody binding capacities (ABC). As far as the antigenic expression of MPO and lysozyme in normal samples is concerned, F&P resulted, in our hands, in the most specific and sensitive staining, followed by FLy solution and OPF, which showed positivity for MPO, and, to lesser extent, for lysozyme in a considerable manner of lymphocytes (means 64% and 54%, respectively, for OPF and FLy; range of ABC/cell: 0.9-5.2 x 10(3)) obtained from healthy subjects. With the reference F&P permeabilizing solution, 90% and 80% of FAB M1-M5 cases were found to be positive for MPO and lysozyme, respectively. However, M1, M2, and M3 AML FAB (French-American-British) subvarieties were characterized by a brighter expression for MPO (mean ABC/cell: 89 x 10(3)) than that of lysozyme (mean ABC/cell: 12.5 x 10(3D)), whereas blast cells from patients with M5a FAB subtypes showed higher levels of lysozyme (mean ABC/cell: 65 x 10(3)) than that of MPO (mean ABC/cell: 0.1 x 10(3)). One of five cases of FAB MO AML showed a dull positivity for MPO-7 McAb. Patients with ALL were MPO and lysozyme negative using both F&P and FLy reagents, although a certain degree of positivity was documented in some cases with OPF. Taking these data together, it can be stated that the use of anti-MPO McAbs may be of great value for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute leukemia and, along with lysozyme McAb, can provide useful information in the distinction of myeloid from monocytic leukemias and in the lineage assignment of apparently biphenotypic forms. However, the methodology used for the detection of these myeloid-associated antigens is critical for a correct interpretation of cytofluorimetric data and should be taken into account when evaluating data coming from multicenter trials dealing with leukemias. A standardization of cytofluorimetric analysis of intracellular antigens is needed in order to improve the reproducibility and comparability of results in multicenter studies.
    Cytometry 07/1997; 30(3):134-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Using a direct one-color (fluorescein isothiocyanate; FITC) staining method with a Facscan flow cytometer, we evaluated the intracellular expression of two granular constituents of myeloid cells [myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lysozyme] on leukemic cells from 21 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 6 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three different permeabilization techniques were used [FACS Lysing Solution (FLy), B.Dis; Ortho-PermeaFix (OPF); Fix and Perm (F&P), Caltag] prior to monoclonal antibody (McAb) staining, in order to verify the specificity and the sensitivity of the three labelling methods towards the two model antigens. Peripheral blood cells from 15 healthy subjects and Ortho Absolute Control served as controls. Data were expressed as percentage of positivity, net fluorescence intensity, ratio between mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of positive cells and that of isotypic controls (P/N ratio; evaluated in both geometric and arithmetic scale), and, in 12 representative cases (7 AML, 5 normal samples), in the form of both molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochromes (MESF) and antibody binding capacities (ABC). As far as the antigenic expression of MPO and lysozyme in normal samples is concerned, F&P resulted, in our hands, in the most specific and sensitive staining, followed by FLy solution and OPF, which showed positivity for MPO, and, to a lesser extent, for lysozyme in a considerable number of lymphocytes (means 64% and 54%, respectively, for OPF and FLy; range of ABC/cell: 0.9–5.2 × 103) obtained from healthy subjects. With the reference F&P permeabilizing solution, 90% and 80% of FAB M1–M5 AML cases were found to be positive for MPO and lysozyme, respectively. However, M1, M2, and M3 AML FAB (French-American-British) subvarieties were characterized by a brighter expression for MPO (mean ABC/cell: 89 × 103) than that of lysozyme (mean ABC/cell: 12.5 × 103), whereas blast cells from patients with M5a FAB subtypes showed higher levels of lysozyme (mean ABC/cell: 65 × 103) than that of MPO (mean ABC/cell: 0.1 × 103). One of five cases of FAB M0 AML showed a dull positivity for MPO-7 McAb. Patients with ALL were MPO and lysozyme negative using both F&P and FLy reagents, although a certain degree of positivity was documented in some cases with OPF. Taking these data together, it can be stated that the use of anti-MPO McAbs may be of great value for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute leukemia and, along with lysozyme McAb, can provide useful information in the distinction of myeloid from monocytic leukemias and in the lineage assignment of apparently biphenotypic forms. However, the methodology used for the detection of these myeloid-associated antigens is critical for a correct interpretation of cytofluorimetric data and should be taken into account when evaluating data coming from multicenter trials dealing with leukemias. A standardization of cytofluorimetric analysis of intracellular antigens is needed in order to improve the reproducibility and comparability of results in multicenter studies. Cytometry 30:134–144, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Cytometry 06/1997; 30(3):134 - 144.
  • European journal of histochemistry: EJH 02/1997; 41 Suppl 2:27-8. · 2.41 Impact Factor
  • European journal of histochemistry: EJH 02/1997; 41 Suppl 2:25-6. · 2.41 Impact Factor
  • Cytometry 08/1996; 24(3):292-5.