M Carola Zillikens

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (96)1160.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and has been associated with many diseases. It has been suggested that vitamin D has effects on the immune system and inhibits inflammation. The aim of our study was to investigate whether vitamin D has an inhibitory effect on systemic inflammation by assessing the association between serum levels of vitamin D and C-reactive protein. We studied the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and C-reactive protein through linear regression in 9,649 participants of the Rotterdam Study, an observational, prospective population-based cohort study. We used genetic variants related to vitamin D and CRP to compute a genetic risk score and perform bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis. In linear regression adjusted for age, sex, cohort and other confounders, natural log-transformed CRP decreased with 0.06 (95% CI: -0.08, -0.03) unit per standard deviation increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Bi-directional Mendelian randomization analyses showed no association between the vitamin D genetic risk score and lnCRP (Beta per SD = -0.018; p = 0.082) or the CRP genetic risk score and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (Beta per SD = 0.001; p = 0.998). In conclusion, higher levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein. In this study we did not find evidence for this to be the result of a causal relationship.
    PLoS ONE 07/2015; 10(7):e0131740. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0131740 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and bone health remains unclear. We aimed to study the association between MS and hip bone geometry (HBG), femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD), and the risk of osteoporosis and incident fractures. Data of 2040 women and 1510 men participants in the third visit (1997–1999) of the Rotterdam Study (RSI-3), a prospective population based cohort, were available (mean follow-up 6.7 years). MS was defined according to the recent harmonized definition. HBG parameters were measured at the third round visit whereas FN-BMD was assessed at the third round and 5 years later. Incident fractures were identified from medical registry data. After correcting for age, body mass index (BMI), lifestyle factors and medication use, individuals with MS had lower bone width (β = -0.054, P = 0.003), lower cortical buckling ratio (β = -0.81, P = 0.003) and lower odds of having osteoporosis (odds ratio =0.56, P = 0.007) in women but not in men. Similarly, MS was associated with higher FN-BMD only in women (β = 0.028, P=0.001). In the analyses of MS components, the glucose component (unrelated to diabetes status) was positively associated with FN-BMD in both genders (β = 0.016, P = 0.01 for women and β = 0.022, P = 0.004 for men). In men, waist circumference was inversely associated with FN-BMD (β = -0.03, P = 0.004). No association was observed with fracture risk in either sex. In conclusion, women with MS had higher FN-BMD independent of BMI. The glucose component of MS was associated with high FN-BMD in both genders, highlighting the need to preserve glycemic control to prevent skeletal complications.
    PLoS ONE 06/2015; 10(6):e0129116. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.012911 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associations with obesity traits have been identified through genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. 32 BMI- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated SNPs were genotyped and genetic risk scores (GRS) calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n=68,317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multi-variable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort, followed by inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR; b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P=0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567), and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjusted WHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Human Molecular Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv186 · 6.68 Impact Factor
  • PLoS ONE 05/2015; 10(5):e0125161. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125161 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Middle-aged and elderly women constitute a large and growing proportion of the population. The peri and postmenopausal period constitutes a challenging transition time for women's health, and menopausal health is a crucial aspect in healthy and successful aging. Currently, no framework for the concept of healthy menopause exists, despite its recognized importance. Therefore, we aimed to: (i) characterize healthy menopause; (ii) identify aspects that contribute to it; and (iii) explore potential approaches to measure it. We propose healthy menopause as a dynamic state, following the permanent loss of ovarian function, which is characterized by self-perceived satisfactory physical, psychological and social functioning, incorporating disease and disability, allowing the attainment of a woman's desired ability to adapt and capacity to self-manage. The concept of healthy menopause applies to all women from the moment they enter the menopausal transition, up until they reach early and late postmenopause and includes women with spontaneous, iatrogenic, and premature menopause. This conceptualization can be considered as a further step in the maintenance and improvement of health in menopausal women from different perspectives, foremost the woman's own perspective, followed by the clinical, public health, and societal perspectives, and can be seen as a further step in delineating lines for future research. Furthermore, it could facilitate the improvement of adequate preventive and treatment strategies, guide scientific efforts, and aid education and communication to health care practitioners and the general public, allowing women the achievement of their potential and the fulfillment of their fundamental role in society. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Maturitas 03/2015; 81(1). DOI:10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.02.010 · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels are associated with increased osteoporotic fracture incidence. However, the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the effect of Hcy-lowering vitamin B12 and folic acid treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included participants aged ≥65 years with plasma Hcy levels between 12 and 50 µmol/L. The intervention comprised 2-year supplementation with either a combination of 500 µg B12, 400 µg folic acid, and 600 IU vitamin D or placebo with 600 IU vitamin D only. In total, 1111 participants underwent repeated dual-energy X-ray assessment and 1165 participants underwent QUS. Femoral neck (FN) BMD, lumbar spine (LS) BMD, calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and calcaneal speed of sound (SOS) were assessed. After 2 years, FN-BMD and BUA had significantly decreased, while LS-BMD significantly increased (all p < 0.01) and SOS did not change in either treatment arm. No statistically significant differences between the intervention and placebo group were present for FN-BMD (p = 0.24), LS-BMD (p = 0.16), SOS (p = 0.67), and BUA (p = 0.96). However, exploratory subgroup analyses revealed a small positive effect of the intervention on BUA at follow-up among compliant persons >80 years (estimated marginal mean 64.4 dB/MHz for the intervention group and 61.0 dB/MHz for the placebo group, p = 0.04 for difference). In conclusion, this study showed no overall effect of treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid on BMD or QUS parameters in elderly, mildly hyperhomocysteinemic persons, but suggests a small beneficial effect on BUA in persons >80 years who were compliant in taking the supplement.
    Calcified Tissue International 02/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00223-015-9968-6 · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 x 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.
    Nature 02/2015; 518(7538-7538):187-96. DOI:10.1038/nature14132 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis
    Nature 02/2015; 518(7538). DOI:10.1038/nature14177 · 42.35 Impact Factor
  • Ling Oei · Fernando Rivadeneira · M. Carola Zillikens · Edwin H. G. Oei
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes and osteoporosis are both common diseases with increasing prevalences in the aging population. There is increasing evidence corroborating an association between diabetes mellitus and bone. This review will discuss the disease complications of diabetes on the skeleton, highlighting findings from epidemiological, molecular, and imaging studies in animal models and humans. Compared to control subjects, decreased bone mineral density (BMD) has been observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus, while on average, higher BMD has been found in type 2 diabetes; nonetheless, patients with both types of diabetes are seemingly at increased risk of fractures. Conventional diagnostics such as DXA measurements and the current fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) risk prediction algorithm for estimating risk of osteoporotic fractures are not sufficient in the case of diabetes. A deterioration in bone microarchitecture and an inefficient distribution of bone mass with insufficiency of repair and adaptation mechanisms appear to be factors of relevance. A highly complex and heterogeneous molecular pathophysiology underlies diabetes-related bone disease, involving hormonal, immune, and perhaps genetic pathways. The detrimental effects of chronically elevated glucose levels on bone should be added to the more well-known complications of diabetes.
    Current Osteoporosis Reports 02/2015; 13(2). DOI:10.1007/s11914-015-0260-5
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular calcification has been associated inconsistently to low bone mineral density and fractures. The aims of the present study were to investigate the associations between coronary artery calcification (CAC) and BMD change, BMD and fracture risk in elderly subjects of the population-based Rotterdam Study. BMD was assessed through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and CAC through Electron-Beam Computed Tomography in 582 men and 694 women. We investigated the associations between BMD change (6.4 years follow-up) and CAC at follow-up and between BMD and CAC (measured simultaneously). In sensitivity analyses we stratified analyses for estradiol levels in women. The association between CAC and fracture risk (9 years follow-up) was tested through competing-risks models. Models were sex-stratified and adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, bisphosphonate use and age at menopause. There was no association between BMD change and CAC in men. In women, each 1% increase in annual BMD loss was significantly associated with higher follow-up CAC [β = 0.22 (0.06-0.38), p=0.006; prevalence ratio: 4%]. Stratified analyses showed significant associations between BMD loss and follow-up CAC only in women with lower estradiol levels. We found no association between CAC and fracture risk and no association between BMD and CAC cross-sectionally. BMD loss was associated with higher follow-up CAC in women, which might be related to low estrogen levels. No association between CAC and BMD or fracture risk was found. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms that might underlie the association between BMD change and coronary calcification in women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Atherosclerosis 02/2015; 241(1). DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.02.013 · 3.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations are a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. Lowering homocysteine with combined vitamin B-12 and folic acid supplementation may reduce fracture risk. This study [B-vitamins for the PRevention Of Osteoporotic Fractures (B-PROOF)] aimed to determine whether vitamin B-12 and folic acid supplementation reduces osteoporotic fracture incidence in hyperhomocysteinemic elderly individuals. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 2919 participants aged ≥65 y with elevated homocysteine concentrations (12-50 μmol/L). Participants were assigned to receive daily 500 μg vitamin B-12 plus 400 μg folic acid or placebo supplementation for 2 y. Both intervention and placebo tablets also contained 600 IU vitamin D3. The primary endpoint was time to first osteoporotic fracture. Exploratory prespecified subgroup analyses were performed in men and women and in individuals younger than and older than age 80 y. Data were analyzed according to intention-to-treat and per-protocol principles. Osteoporotic fractures occurred in 61 persons (4.2%) in the intervention group and 75 persons (5.1%) in the placebo group. Osteoporotic fracture risk was not significantly different between groups in the intention-to-treat analyses (HR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.58, 1.21) or per-protocol analyses (HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.21). For persons aged >80 y, in per-protocol analyses, osteoporotic fracture risk was lower in the intervention group than in the placebo group (HR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10, 0.74). The total number of adverse events (including mortality) did not differ between groups. However, 63 and 42 participants in the intervention and placebo groups, respectively, reported incident cancer (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.31). These data show that combined vitamin B-12 and folic acid supplementation had no effect on osteoporotic fracture incidence in this elderly population. Exploratory subgroup analyses suggest a beneficial effect on osteoporotic fracture prevention in compliant persons aged >80 y. However, treatment was also associated with increased incidence of cancer, although the study was not designed for assessing cancer outcomes. Therefore, vitamin B-12 plus folic acid supplementation cannot be recommended at present for fracture prevention in elderly people. The B-PROOF study was registered with the Netherlands Trial Register (trialregister.nl) as NTR1333 and at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00696414. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 12/2014; 100(6):1578-86. DOI:10.3945/ajcn.114.090043 · 6.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small-scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177 330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m2, P = 1.9 × 10−105), and all participants (0.30 [0.30, 0.35] kg/m2, P = 3.6 × 10−107). The BMI-increasing allele of the FTO variant showed a significant association with higher dietary protein intake (effect per allele = 0.08 [0.06, 0.10] %, P = 2.4 × 10−16), and relative weak associations with lower total energy intake (−6.4 [−10.1, −2.6] kcal/day, P = 0.001) and lower dietary carbohydrate intake (−0.07 [−0.11, −0.02] %, P = 0.004). The associations with protein (P = 7.5 × 10−9) and total energy (P = 0.002) were attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for BMI. We did not find significant interactions between the FTO variant and dietary intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate or fat on BMI. Our findings suggest a positive association between the BMI-increasing allele of FTO variant and higher dietary protein intake and offer insight into potential link between FTO, dietary protein intake and adiposity.
    Human Molecular Genetics 08/2014; 23(25). DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddu411 · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: several studies have been pointing towards a non-linear relationship between serum 25(OH)D and cardiovascular disease. Next to vitamin D deficiency, also higher levels of 25(OH)D have been reported to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the nature of the relationship between serum 25(OH) D and measures of arterial stiffness and arteriosclerosis in an elderly population. Design: cross-sectional. Setting/subjects: a subgroup of the B-PROOF study was included to determine associations between serum 25(OH)D and arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis (n = 567, 57% male, age 72.6 +/- 5.6 years, mean serum 25(OH)D 54.6 +/- 24.1 nmol/l). Methods: carotid intima media thickness (IMT) was assessed using ultrasonography and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined with applanation tonometry. Associations were tested using multivariable restricted cubic spline functions and stratified linear regression analysis. Results: the associations between serum 25(OH)D and carotid IMT or PWV were non-linear. Spline functions demonstrated a difference between 25(OH)D deficient and sufficient individuals. In serum 25(OH)D sufficient participants (a parts per thousand yen50 nmol/l; n = 287), a positive association with IMT and serum 25(OH)D was present (beta 1.24; 95%CI [0.002; 2.473]). PWV levels were slightly lower in vitamin D deficient individuals, but the association with 25(OH)D was not significant. Conclusion: our study demonstrates that associations of serum 25(OH)D and PWV and IMT in an elderly population are not linear. In particular from serum 25(OH)D levels of 50 nmol/l and up, there is a slight increase of IMT with increasing 25(OH)D levels.
    Age and Ageing 07/2014; 44(1). DOI:10.1093/ageing/afu095 · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated homocysteine levels are a risk indicator for cardiovascular disease, fractures and cognitive decline. Previous studies indicated associations between homocysteine levels and medication use, including antihypertensive, lipid-lowering and antidiabetic medication. However, results were often contradictory and inconclusive. Our objective was to study the associations established previously in more detail by sub-classifying medication groups, and investigate the potential mediating role of vitamin B12 and folate status.
    Drugs & Aging 07/2014; DOI:10.1007/s40266-014-0192-2 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of frailty in a Dutch elderly population and to identify adverse health outcomes associated with the frailty phenotype independent of the comorbidities. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses within the Rotterdam Study (the Netherlands), a prospective population-based cohort study in persons aged ≥55 years. Frailty was defined as meeting three or more of five established criteria for frailty, evaluating nutritional status, physical activity, mobility, grip strength and exhaustion. Intermediate frailty was defined as meeting one or two frailty criteria. Comorbidities were objectively measured. Health outcomes were assessed by means of questionnaires, physical examinations and continuous follow-up through general practitioners and municipal health authorities for mortality. Of 2,833 participants (median age 74.0 years, inter quartile range 9) with sufficiently evaluated frailty criteria, 163 (5.8 %) participants were frail and 1,454 (51.3 %) intermediate frail. Frail elderly were more likely to be older and female, to have an impaired quality of life and to have fallen or to have been hospitalized. 108 (72.0 %) frail participants had ≥2 comorbidities, compared to 777 (54.4 %) intermediate frail and 522 (44.8 %) non-frail participants. Adjusted for age, sex and comorbidities, frail elderly had a significantly increased risk of dying within 3 years (HR 3.4; 95 % CI 1.9-6.4), compared to the non-frail elderly. This study in a general Dutch population of community-dwelling elderly able to perform the frailty tests, demonstrates that frailty is common and that frail elderly are at increased risk of death independent of comorbidities.
    European Journal of Epidemiology 06/2014; 29(6). DOI:10.1007/s10654-014-9924-1 · 5.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heritability of bone mineral density (BMD) varies across skeletal sites, reflecting different relative contributions of genetic and environmental influences. To quantify the degree to which common genetic variants tag and environmental factors influence BMD, at different sites, we estimated the genetic (rg) and residual (re) correlations between BMD measured at the upper limbs (UL-BMD), lower limbs (LL-BMD) and skull (SK-BMD), using total-body DXA scans of ∼4,890 participants recruited by the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and their Children (ALSPAC). Point estimates of rg indicated that appendicular sites have a greater proportion of shared genetic architecture (LL-/UL-BMD rg = 0.78) between them, than with the skull (UL-/SK-BMD rg = 0.58 and LL-/SK-BMD rg = 0.43). Likewise, the residual correlation between BMD at appendicular sites (re = 0.55) was higher than the residual correlation between SK-BMD and BMD at appendicular sites (re = 0.20-0.24). To explore the basis for the observed differences in rg and re, genome-wide association meta-analyses were performed (n∼9,395), combining data from ALSPAC and the Generation R Study identifying 15 independent signals from 13 loci associated at genome-wide significant level across different skeletal regions. Results suggested that previously identified BMD-associated variants may exert site-specific effects (i.e. differ in the strength of their association and magnitude of effect across different skeletal sites). In particular, variants at CPED1 exerted a larger influence on SK-BMD and UL-BMD when compared to LL-BMD (P = 2.01×10-37), whilst variants at WNT16 influenced UL-BMD to a greater degree when compared to SK- and LL-BMD (P = 2.31×10-14). In addition, we report a novel association between RIN3 (previously associated with Paget's disease) and LL-BMD (rs754388: β = 0.13, SE = 0.02, P = 1.4×10-10). Our results suggest that BMD at different skeletal sites is under a mixture of shared and specific genetic and environmental influences. Allowing for these differences by performing genome-wide association at different skeletal sites may help uncover new genetic influences on BMD.
    PLoS Genetics 06/2014; 10(6):e1004423. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004423 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context: Low bone mineral density (BMD) has been associated with increased all-cause mortality. Cause-specific mortality studies have been controversial. Objective: To investigate associations between BMD and all-cause mortality and in-depth cause-specific mortality. Design and setting: Two cohorts from the prospective Rotterdam Study (RS), initiated in 1990 (RS-I) and 2000 (RS-II) with average follow-up of 17.1 (RS-I) and 10.2 (RS-II) years until January 2011. Baseline femoral neck BMD was analyzed in standard deviations. Deaths were classified according to International Classification of Diseases into 7 groups: cardiovascular diseases, cancer, infections, external, dementia, chronic lung diseases and other causes. Gender-stratified Cox and competing-risks models were adjusted for age, body mass index and smoking. Participants: 5779 (RS-I); 2055 (RS-II) subjects. Main outcome measurements: all-cause; cause-specific mortality. Results: A significant inverse association between BMD and all-cause mortality was found in males (HR(95%CI) RS-I: 1.07 (1.01-1.13), p=0.020; RS-II: 1.31 (1.12-1.55), p=0.001) but not in females (RS-I: 1.05 (0.99-1.11), p=0.098; RS-II: 0.91 (0.74-1.12), p=0.362). An inverse association with chronic lung disease mortality was found in males (RS-I: 1.75 (1.34-2.29), p <0.001; RS-II: 2.15 (1.05-4.42), p=0.037) and in RS-I in females (1.72 (1.16-2.57), p=0.008) persisting after multiple adjustments and excluding prevalent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A positive association between BMD and cancer mortality was detected in females in RS-I (0.89 (0.80-0.99), p=0.043). No association was found with cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions: BMD is inversely associated with mortality. The strong association of BMD with chronic lung disease mortality is a novel finding that needs further analysis to clarify underlying mechanisms.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 02/2014; 99(5):jc20133819. DOI:10.1210/jc.2013-3819 · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vertebral fracture risk is a heritable complex trait. The aim of this study was to identify genetic susceptibility factors for osteoporotic vertebral fractures applying a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. The GWAS discovery was based on the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study of elderly Dutch individuals aged > 55 years; and comprising 329 cases and 2666 controls with radiographic scoring (McCloskey–Kanis) and genetic data. Replication of one top-associated SNP was pursued by de-novo genotyping of 15 independent studies across Europe, the United States, and Australia and one Asian study. Radiographic vertebral fracture assessment was performed using McCloskey–Kanis or Genant semi-quantitative definitions. SNPs were analyzed in relation to vertebral fracture using logistic regression models corrected for age and sex. Fixed effects inverse variance and Han–Eskin alternative random effects meta-analyses were applied. Genome-wide significance was set at p < 5 × 10− 8. In the discovery, a SNP (rs11645938) on chromosome 16q24 was associated with the risk for vertebral fractures at p = 4.6 × 10− 8. However, the association was not significant across 5720 cases and 21,791 controls from 14 studies. Fixed-effects meta-analysis summary estimate was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.98–1.14; p = 0.17), displaying high degree of heterogeneity (I2 = 57%; Qhet p = 0.0006). Under Han–Eskin alternative random effects model the summary effect was significant (p = 0.0005). The SNP maps to a region previously found associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD) in two large meta-analyses from the GEFOS consortium. A false positive association in the GWAS discovery cannot be excluded, yet, the low-powered setting of the discovery and replication settings (appropriate to identify risk effect size > 1.25) may still be consistent with an effect size < 1.10, more of the type expected in complex traits. Larger effort in studies with standardized phenotype definitions is needed to confirm or reject the involvement of this locus on the risk for vertebral fractures.
    Bone 02/2014; 59:20-7. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the baby growing in its mother's womb needs calcium for skeletal development osteoporosis and fractures very rarely occur during pregnancy. A 27-year old woman in the seventh month of her first pregnancy contracted mid-thoracic back pain after lifting an object. The pain was attributed to her pregnancy, but remained post-partum. Her past medical history was uneventful, except for severely reduced vision of her left eye since birth. Family history revealed that her maternal grandmother had postmenopausal osteoporosis and her half-brother had three fractures during childhood after minor trauma. Her height was 1.58 m, she had no blue sclerae or joint hyperlaxity. Laboratory examination including serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, bCTX, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and TSH was normal. Multiple thoracic vertebral fractures were diagnosed on X-ray examination and DXA-scanning showed severe osteoporosis (Z-scores L2-L4: -5.6 SD, femur neck: -3.9 SD). DNA analyses revealed two compound heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5. Her mother carried one of the LRP5 mutations and was diagnosed with osteoporosis. Her half-brother, treated with cabergoline for a microprolactinoma, also had osteoporosis of the lumbar spine on DXA and carried the same LRP5 mutation. The patient was treated with risedronate for 2.5 years. BMD and back pain improved. She stopped bisphosphonate use 6 months before planning a second pregnancy. Our patient was diagnosed with osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome/familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Potentially underlying genetic causes should be considered in pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with implications for patients and relatives. More studies regarding osteoporosis treatment preceding conception are desirable.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 01/2014; 99(4):jc20133238. DOI:10.1210/jc.2013-3238 · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several recent studies suggest that obesity may be a risk factor for fracture. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and future fracture risk at different skeletal sites. In prospective cohorts from more than 25 countries, baseline data on BMI were available in 398,610 women with an average age of 63 years (range 20-105 years) and follow up of 2.2 million person-years during which 30,280 osteoporotic fractures (6,457 hip fractures) occurred. Femoral neck BMD was measured in 108,267 of these women. Obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m(2) ) was present in 22%. A majority of osteoporotic fractures (81%) and hip fractures (87%) arose in non-obese women. Compared to a BMI of 25 kg/m(2) , the hazard ratio (HR, 95% CI) for osteoporotic fracture at a BMI of 35 kg/m(2) was 0.87 (0.85-0.90). When adjusted for BMD, however, the same comparison showed that the hazard ratio for osteoporotic fracture was increased (HR= 1.16; 95% CI = 1.09 - 1.23). Low BMI is a risk factor for hip and all osteoporotic fracture, but is a protective factor for lower leg fracture, whereas high BMI is a risk factor for upper arm (humerus and elbow) fracture. When adjusted for BMD, low BMI remained a risk factor for hip fracture but was protective for osteoporotic fracture, tibia and fibula fracture, distal forearm fracture and upper arm fracture. When adjusted for BMD, high BMI remained a risk factor for upper arm fracture but was also a risk factor for all osteoporotic fractures. The association between BMI and fracture risk is complex, differs across skeletal sites and is modified by the interaction between BMI and BMD. At a population level, high BMI remains a protective factor for most sites of fragility fracture. The contribution of increasing population rates of obesity to apparent decreases in fracture rates should be explored.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 01/2014; 29(1). DOI:10.1002/jbmr.2017 · 6.59 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,160.54 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2015
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Endocrinology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004–2015
    • Erasmus MC
      • • Department of Epidemiology
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2013
    • Lund University
      • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden