Peter A Fasching

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Ángeles, California, United States

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Publications (519)2541.54 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.
    Endocrine Related Cancer 10/2015; 22(5):851-61. DOI:10.1530/ERC-15-0319 · 4.81 Impact Factor
  • Kate Lawrenson · Edwin S Iversen · Jonathan Tyrer · Rachel Palmieri Weber · Patrick Concannon · Dennis J Hazelett · Qiyuan Li · Jeffrey R Marks · Andrew Berchuck · Janet M Lee · [...] · Wei Zheng · Argyrios Ziogas · Gerhard A Coetzee · Matthew L Freedman · Alvaro N.A. Monteiro · Joanna Moes-Sosnowska · Jolanta Kupryjanczyk · Paul D Pharoah · Simon A Gayther · Joellen M Schildkraut
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here we evaluated associations between common genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels) in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15,397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r(2) with rs17507066=0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1 x10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72x10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r(2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70 x 10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q11.2 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.
    Carcinogenesis 10/2015; DOI:10.1093/carcin/bgv138 · 5.33 Impact Factor
  • Felix R Day · Katherine S Ruth · Deborah J Thompson · Kathryn L Lunetta · Natalia Pervjakova · Daniel I Chasman · Lisette Stolk · Hilary K Finucane · Patrick Sulem · Brendan Bulik-Sullivan · [...] · David R Weir · Laura M Yerges-Armstrong · Alkes L Price · Kari Stefansson · Jenny A Visser · Ken K Ong · Jenny Chang-Claude · Joanne M Murabito · John R B Perry · Anna Murray
    Nature Genetics 09/2015; DOI:10.1038/ng.3412 · 29.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.
    Genetic Epidemiology 09/2015; DOI:10.1002/gepi.21921 · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    Kate Lawrenson · Qiyuan Li · Siddhartha Kar · Ji-Heui Seo · Jonathan Tyrer · Tassja J Spindler · Janet Lee · Yibu Chen · Alison Karst · Ronny Drapkin · [...] · Yin-Ling Woo · Xifeng Wu · Anna H Wu · Hannah Yang · Wei Zheng · Argyrios Ziogas · Alvaro Monteiro · Paul D Pharoah · Simon A Gayther · Matthew L Freedman
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have reported 11 regions conferring risk of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses can identify candidate susceptibility genes at risk loci. Here we evaluate cis-eQTL associations at 47 regions associated with HGSOC risk (P≤10(-5)). For three cis-eQTL associations (P<1.4 × 10(-3), FDR<0.05) at 1p36 (CDC42), 1p34 (CDCA8) and 2q31 (HOXD9), we evaluate the functional role of each candidate by perturbing expression of each gene in HGSOC precursor cells. Overexpression of HOXD9 increases anchorage-independent growth, shortens population-doubling time and reduces contact inhibition. Chromosome conformation capture identifies an interaction between rs2857532 and the HOXD9 promoter, suggesting this SNP is a leading causal variant. Transcriptomic profiling after HOXD9 overexpression reveals enrichment of HGSOC risk variants within HOXD9 target genes (P=6 × 10(-10) for risk variants (P<10(-4)) within 10 kb of a HOXD9 target gene in ovarian cells), suggesting a broader role for this network in genetic susceptibility to HGSOC.
    Nature Communications 09/2015; 6:8234. DOI:10.1038/ncomms9234 · 11.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Obese breast cancer patients have worse prognosis than normal weight patients, but the level at which obesity is prognostically unfavorable is unclear. Methods: This retrospective analysis was performed using data from the SUCCESS A trial, in which 3754 patients with high-risk early breast cancer were randomized to anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapy with or without gemcitabine. Patients were classified as underweight/normal weight (body mass index (BMI) < 25.0), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), slightly obese (BMI 30.0-34.9), moderately obese (BMI 35.0-39.9) and severely obese (BMI ≥ 40.0), and the effect of BMI on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated (median follow-up 65 months). In addition, subgroup analyses were conducted to assess the effect of BMI in luminal A-like, luminal B-like, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor 2)-positive and triple-negative tumors. Results: Multivariate analyses revealed an independent prognostic effect of BMI on DFS (p = 0.001) and OS (p = 0.005). Compared with underweight/normal weight patients, severely obese patients had worse DFS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.70, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.71-4.28, p < 0.001) and OS (HR 2.79, 95 % CI 1.63-4.77, p < 0.001), while moderately obese, slightly obese and overweight patients did not differ from underweight/normal weight patients with regard to DFS or OS. Subgroup analyses showed a similar significant effect of BMI on DFS and OS in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), but not in patients with other tumor subtypes. Conclusions: Severe obesity (BMI ≥ 40) significantly worsens prognosis in early breast cancer patients, particularly for triple-negative tumors. Trial registration: NCT02181101 . Registered September 2005.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 09/2015; 17(1):129. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0639-3 · 5.49 Impact Factor
  • Linda E Kelemen · Kate Lawrenson · Jonathan Tyrer · Qiyuan Li · Janet M Lee · J.-H. Seo · Catherine M Phelan · Jonathan Beesley · Xiaoqin Chen · Tassja J Spindler · [...] · Anna H Wu · Hannah Yang · Wei Zheng · Argyrios Ziogas · Thomas A Sellers · Matthew L Freedman · Georgia Chenevix-Trench · Paul D P Pharoah · Simon A Gayther · Andrew Berchuck
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10-8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10-12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10-13). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10-4, false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease.
    Nature Genetics 08/2015; 47(8):888-897. DOI:10.1038/ng.3336 · 29.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P=1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses.
    Oncotarget 08/2015; DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.4991 · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. Results: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15 to 1.19) per 10cm increase in height in the meta-analysis of prospective studies. In Mendelian randomization analysis, the odds ratio of breast cancer per 10cm increase in genetically predicted height was 1.22 (95% CI = 1.13 to 1.32) in the first consortium and 1.21 (95% CI = 1.05 to 1.39) in the second consortium. The association was found in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women but restricted to hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Analyses of height-associated variants identified eight new loci associated with breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons, including three loci at 1q21.2, DNAJC27, and CCDC91 at genome-wide significance level P < 5×10(-8). Conclusions: Our study provides strong evidence that adult height is a risk factor for breast cancer in women and certain genetic factors and biological pathways affecting adult height have an important role in the etiology of breast cancer.
    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 08/2015; 107(11). DOI:10.1093/jnci/djv219 · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Mammographic density is an established breast cancer risk factor with a strong genetic component and can be increased in women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Here, we aimed to identify genetic variants that may modify the association between MHT use and mammographic density. Methods: The study comprised 6,298 postmenopausal women from the Mayo Mammography Health Study and nine studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We selected for evaluation 1327 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing the lowest P-values for interaction (P int) in a meta-analysis of genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies with MHT use on risk of breast cancer, 2541 SNPs in candidate genes (AKR1C4, CYP1A1-CYP1A2, CYP1B1, ESR2, PPARG, PRL, SULT1A1-SULT1A2 and TNF) and ten SNPs (AREG-rs10034692, PRDM6-rs186749, ESR1-rs12665607, ZNF365-rs10995190, 8p11.23-rs7816345, LSP1-rs3817198, IGF1-rs703556, 12q24-rs1265507, TMEM184B-rs7289126, and SGSM3-rs17001868) associated with mammographic density in genome-wide studies. We used multiple linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders to evaluate interactions between SNPs and current use of MHT on mammographic density. Results: No significant interactions were identified after adjustment for multiple testing. The strongest SNP-MHT interaction (unadjusted P int <0.0004) was observed with rs9358531 6.5kb 5' of PRL. Furthermore, three SNPs in PLCG2 that had previously been shown to modify the association of MHT use with breast cancer risk were found to modify also the association of MHT use with mammographic density (unadjusted P int <0.002), but solely among cases (unadjusted P int SNP×MHT×case-status <0.02). Conclusions: The study identified potential interactions on mammographic density between current use of MHT and SNPs near PRL and in PLCG2, which require confirmation. Given the moderate size of the interactions observed, larger studies are needed to identify genetic modifiers of the association of MHT use with mammographic density.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 08/2015; 17(1):110. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0625-9 · 5.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Tumour documentation is essential for quality assurance of oncological therapies and as a source of reliable information about the in- and outpatient care. The documentation effort and the associated resource consumption were analysed for the example of breast cancer. Material and Methods: The different steps in the care of patients with primary breast cancer in a standardised disease situation were defined from initial diagnosis to the end of the follow-up. After the pilot phase, a multicentre validation (n=7 centres) was performed with the support of the Federal Ministry of Health. The documentation time points were horizontally collected and analysed with regard to amount, duration and personnel expenses. Results: 57% of the documentation costs are caused by the physicians. Regarding the different centres, documentation costs were calculated between € 352.82 and € 1 084.08 per patient from diagnosis to completion of aftercare. Non-certified centres had a reduced documentation effort and thus lower costs. Conclusions: The results demonstrate the need for a reduction of the documentation effort - particularly for physicians - the most expensive profession in the health system. A quality improvement is expected from the certification with its special requirements. In this context, there is a justified demand for an adequate remuneration of the documentation effort for certified centres. Furthermore, it is necessary to reduce the number of variables for quality assurance and to define them centrally. A comprehensive multi-disciplinary documentation should be achieved. Investments in a single data set and interface enhancements of existing documentation systems should be realised. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
    Das Gesundheitswesen 08/2015; DOI:10.1055/s-0035-1554707 · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):5485-5485. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-5485 · 9.33 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):5488-5488. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-5488 · 9.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medical research studies are becoming increasingly important for optimizing the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of illnesses. Participation in research studies can have many benefits for patients. In randomized and controlled clinical studies, they can receive the best possible medical care currently available. However, only a small proportion of patients nowadays are treated within the framework of medical research. The primary endpoint of this study was to discover what level of knowledge patients have about clinical studies and how they currently perceive them, in order to identify ways of optimizing the information provided about studies from the patients' point of view. The study included 2546 patients (breast cancer 21.6 %, gynecological cancer 8.3 %, obstetrics 32.7 %, endometriosis 7.8 %, fertility treatment 3.2 %, other benign gynecological illnesses 19.2 %, no information for 7.2 %) in the outpatient clinic (45.2 %) and in the in-patient sector (54.8 %) at the Department of Gynecology at Erlangen University Hospital and associated centers. In the single-center study, conducted between January 2011 and January 2012, the patients were asked about their level of knowledge regarding the background to medical research studies and the ways in which they are carried out and used. The patients were also asked how they perceived medical studies and how they thought study conditions might be optimized. The three-page questionnaire was included in the feedback sheet received by patients as part of the hospital's quality management system. As a whole, the group only had moderate knowledge about clinical studies. A majority of the respondents considered that studies were valuable (91.6 %), but only a few were also willing to take part in them (58.4 %). Knowledge and willingness to participate strongly depended on age (P < 0.001), educational level (P < 0.001) and patient group (P < 0.001). Most patients would prefer to decide about participating in studies through a discussion with their outpatient physicians. The information that patients have about clinical studies affects whether they participate in them. It is therefore extremely important for patients to be well informed, for their anxieties about participation to be relieved, and for the benefits of participation to be explained to them.
    BMC Cancer 08/2015; 15(1):587. DOI:10.1186/s12885-015-1584-3 · 3.36 Impact Factor
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    Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):5483-5483. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-5483 · 9.33 Impact Factor
  • R. Schulz-Wendtland · M.W. Beckmann · P.A. Fasching · M. Uder
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    ABSTRACT: Full field digital mammography (FFDM) is the most important method for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The typical overlapping of normal and pathological tissue during the standard 2D projection, however, often reduces the specificity and sensitivity of the mammographic investigation. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides on the basis of a limited number of single images with different projection angles not superimposed tomograms and may remove the unwanted masking by superimposed structures. Clinical studies show that the digital tomosynthesis has the real potential to reduce the recall rate and simultaneously increase the cancer detection rate, especially in women with dense breasts (detection and volumetry). The use of tomosynthesis seems to be superior to full field digital mammography in mammography screening. Other possibilities of the tomosynthesis are the dual energy mammography, contrast medium-enhanced mammography and intervention.
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3,194 cases and 7,060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customised iCOGS arrays (10,065 cases and 21,663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI=0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI=0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI=0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI=0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email:
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv306 · 6.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified by co-expression may also be enriched for additional EOC risk associations. We selected TF genes within 1 Mb of the top signal at the 12 genome-wide significant risk loci. Mutual information, a form of correlation, was used to build networks of genes strongly co-expressed with each selected TF gene in the unified microarray data set of 489 serous EOC tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genes represented in this data set were subsequently ranked using a gene-level test based on results for germline SNPs from a serous EOC GWAS meta-analysis (2,196 cases/4,396 controls). Gene set enrichment analysis identified six networks centered on TF genes (HOXB2, HOXB5, HOXB6, HOXB7 at 17q21.32 and HOXD1, HOXD3 at 2q31) that were significantly enriched for genes from the risk-associated end of the ranked list (P<0.05 and FDR<0.05). These results were replicated (P<0.05) using an independent association study (7,035 cases/21,693 controls). Genes underlying enrichment in the six networks were pooled into a combined network. We identified a HOX-centric network associated with serous EOC risk containing several genes with known or emerging roles in serous EOC development. Network analysis integrating large, context-specific data sets has the potential to offer mechanistic insights into cancer susceptibility and prioritize genes for experimental characterization. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 07/2015; DOI:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1270 · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. We hypothesize that germline polymorphisms might be associated with clinical outcome. We analyzed ~2.8 million genotyped and imputed SNPs from the iCOGS experiment for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in 2,901 European epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients who underwent firstline treatment of cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy regardless of regimen, and in a subset of 1,098 patients treated with ≥4 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin at standard doses. We evaluated the top SNPs in 4,434 EOC patients including patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Additionally we conducted pathway analysis of all intragenic SNPs and tested their association with PFS and OS using gene set enrichment analysis. Five SNPs were significantly associated (p≤1.0x10(-5)) with poorer outcomes in at least one of the four analyses, three of which, rs4910232 (11p15.3), rs2549714 (16q23) and rs6674079 (1q22) were located in long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) RP11-179A10.1, RP11-314O13.1 and RP11-284F21.8 respectively (p≤7.1x10(-6)). ENCODE ChIP-seq data at 1q22 for normal ovary shows evidence of histone modification around RP11-284F21.8, and rs6674079 is perfectly correlated with another SNP within the super-enhancer MEF2D, expression levels of which were reportedly associated with prognosis in another solid tumor. YAP1- and WWTR1 (TAZ)-stimulated gene expression, and HDL-mediated lipid transport pathways were associated with PFS and OS, respectively, in the cohort who had standard chemotherapy (pGSEA≤6x10(-3)). We have identified SNPs in three lncRNAs that might be important targets for novel EOC therapies. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Clinical Cancer Research 07/2015; DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-15-0632 · 8.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30-34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99-1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01-1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m(-2)) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m(-2)), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m(-2)) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 7 July 2015; doi:10.1038/bjc.2015.245
    British Journal of Cancer 07/2015; 113(5). DOI:10.1038/bjc.2015.245 · 4.84 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
2,541.54 Total Impact Points


  • 2009–2015
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology
      Los Ángeles, California, United States
    • Institut für klinische Pharmakologie
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2003–2015
    • Universitätsklinikum Erlangen
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2001–2015
    • Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Midwifery
      Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2014
    • Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
      • Clinic and Polyclinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2010–2014
    • Dr. Horst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden
      Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany
  • 2013
    • Herlev Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2012
    • German Breast Group
      Neulsenburg, Hesse, Germany
    • Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
      • Frauenklinik
      Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2011
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Health Science Research
      Rochester, MN, United States
    • University of Southern California
      • Department of Preventive Medicine
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
    • Universitätsklinikum Tübingen
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2009–2010
    • University of Cambridge
      • • Department of Public Health and Primary Care
      • • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom