K Gangopadhyay

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Jeddah, Mintaqat Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Are you K Gangopadhyay?

Claim your profile

Publications (14)13.26 Total impact

  • K Gangopadhyay, P D McArthur, J M Martin, M Saleem
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Endodermal sinus tumor is an uncommon malignant germ cell tumor that occurs in both gonadal and extragonadal tissues. Endodermal sinus tumors of the head and neck, exclusive of the central nervous system, are rare. We report a case of endodermal sinus tumor arising from the maxillary sinus in a 4-year-old boy. Combined treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy resulted in complete tumor regression.
    Ear, nose, & throat journal 06/1999; 78(5):376-7, 381-2. · 1.03 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, M O Abuzeid
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 03/1999; 120(2):286. · 1.73 Impact Factor
  • Z Z Mahasin, M Saleem, K Gangopadhyay
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Radical neck dissection is one of the commonest procedures performed in any unit dealing with head and neck surgery. Intracranial complications following this procedure are uncommon. Transverse sinus thrombosis and venous infarction of the brain following unilateral radical neck dissection have not been reported in the literature. We present a case in which this complication occurred following an uneventful radical neck dissection.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 01/1998; 112(1):88-91. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, M O Abuzeid, J M Martin, M Saleem
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Metastatic tumours in major salivary glands are uncommon, with a higher incidence of primary sites from the head and neck. Renal cell carcinoma often exhibits unusual behaviour causing both clinical and pathological confusion. Renal cell carcinoma initially presenting as a metastatic swelling in the parotid gland or elsewhere in the head and neck is rare. We report a case of renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid gland where the neck swelling was the first sign of the tumour, with a comprehensive review of the literature.
    International Journal of Clinical Practice 01/1998; 52(3):196-8. · 2.43 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, Z Z Mahasin, H Kfoury
    Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 11/1997; 123(10):1137, 1139. · 1.78 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, Z Z Mahasin, H Kfoury, M Ashraf Ali
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours are aetiologically enigmatic, nosologically confusing and biologically unpredictable lesions. The lungs are the organs of apparent predilection. These tumours have also been documented in a number of extrapulmonary sites including the head and neck. So far only two cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the tonsil have been reported in the English literature. We document another case, occurring in a 41-year-old man with history of cadaveric renal transplant nine years ago. A comprehensive review of the literature is also presented.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 10/1997; 111(9):880-2. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • A T al-Otieschan, K Gangopadhyay
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 03/1997; 111(2):198. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of otolaryngology 01/1997; 25(6):412-5. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, K Taibah, M B Manohar, H Kfoury
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Solitary fibrous tumors are uncommon spindle cell neoplasms generally associated with serosal surfaces, especially the pleura. Recently, these tumors have been documented in a number of extrapleural sites including the head and neck. So far only two cases of parapharyngeal solitary fibrous tumor have been reported in the English literature. Rare location of an uncommon lesion often gives rise to difficulty in diagnosis or to misdiagnosis. In both the previously reported cases, as well as in our case, the diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor was not made until the excised tumor was subjected to histopathology and immunohistochemistry.
    Ear, nose, & throat journal 11/1996; 75(10):681-4. · 1.03 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, M O Abuzeid, H Kfoury
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hydatid disease is caused by the parasitic tapeworm. Echinococcus. This parasite in larval stage can thrive in many parts of the body, most commonly in the liver and the lung. Hydatid disease in the head and neck region is rare. An unusual location for hydatid disease in the pterygopalatine fossa-infratemporal fossa is presented. The patient did not have evidence of any other cyst on a ten-year follow-up.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 11/1996; 110(10):978-80. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • K Gangopadhyay, P D McArthur, S G Larsson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The position and dimensions of the jugular bulb and the venous dural sinuses vary considerably. While the anatomical variations of the jugular bulb have been extensively reported in the literature, that of the sigmoid sinus have been reported only rarely. We report a case of unusual anterior course of the vertical segment of the sigmoid sinus which was encountered during an attempted myringoplasty. Anomalies of the jugular bulb in general are also described.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 11/1996; 110(10):984-6. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Solitary fibrous tumour was first described as a pleural tumour. It has been reported in a number of extrapleural sites including the head and neck. We present the first case of solitary fibrous tumour of the infratemporal fossa described in the English literature. Complete excision was achieved using the orbitozygomatic infratemporal craniotomy approach.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 07/1996; 110(6):594-7. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • Source
    M Abuzeid, K Gangopadhyay, C S Rayappa, J I Antonios
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sebaceous carcinoma arising from the buccal mucosa is very rare. Only one such case has been reported in the English literature. We report a second case arising in an 11-year-old girl.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 06/1996; 110(5):500-2. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • Kunal Gangopadhyay, Z Mahasin, Hala Kfoury, M Ashraf
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours are aetiologically enigmatic, nosologically confusing and biologically unpredictable lesions. The lungs are the organs of apparent predilection. These tumours have also been documented in a number of extrapulmonary sites including the head and neck. So far only two cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the tonsil have been reported in the English literature. We document another case, occurring in a 41-year-old man with history of cadaveric renal transplant nine years ago. A comprehensive review of the literature is also presented. Introduction Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a distinc-tive pseudosarcomatous inflammatory lesion that occurs in the soft tissue and the viscera of children and young adults. It has a distinctive histological appearance, a benign course with multifocal lesions or recurrence in a proportion of cases, and a disputed nosology (Coffin et al., 1995). Its unknown cause and morphological features have led to several synonyms in the literature such as inflammatory pseudotumour, plasma cell granuloma, plasma cell pseu-dotumour, xanthomatous pseudotumour, pseudosarcoma-tous myofibroblastic proliferation and inflammatory myofibroblastic proliferation. IMT occurs most commonly as a solitary lesion in the lung. Extrapulmonary forms have a preference for the abdomen, head and neck, and central nervous system (Treissman et al, 1994). IMT of the head and neck have been reported to occur mostly in the orbit and upper aerodigestive tracts (larynx, oral cavity, oropharynx, oesophagus, and paranasal sinus), but also in the major salivary glands and the parapharyngeal and pterygomaxillary spaces (Batsakis et al, 1995). Only two cases of IMT of the tonsil have been reported in the English literature (Weilbaecher and Sarma, 1984; Newman and Shinn, 1995). We report the third case of tonsillar IMT.