Mark Berneburg

Universität Regensburg, Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (125)372.2 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In healthy human skin host defense molecules such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) contribute to skin immune homeostasis. In patients with the congenital disease ectodermal dysplasia (ED) skin integrity is disturbed and as a result patients have recurrent skin infections. The disease is characterized by developmental abnormalities of ectodermal derivatives and absent or reduced sweating. We hypothesized that ED patients have a reduced skin immune defense due to the reduced ability to sweat. Therefore, we performed a label-free quantitative proteome analysis of wash solution of human skin from ED patients or healthy individuals. A clear cut difference between both cohorts could be observed in cellular processes related to immunity and host defense. In line with the extensive underrepresentation of proteins of the immune system, dermcidin, a sweat derived AMP, was reduced in its abundance in the skin secretome of ED patients. In contrast, proteins involved in metabolic/catabolic- and biosynthetic processes were enriched in the skin secretome of ED patients. In summary, our proteome profiling provides insights into the actual situation of healthy versus diseased skin. The systematic reduction of immune system and defense related proteins may contribute to the high susceptibility of ED patients to skin infections and altered skin colonization.Journal of Investigative Dermatology accepted article preview online, 27 October 2014. doi:10.1038/jid.2014.462.
    The Journal of investigative dermatology. 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Wound repair is a quiescent mechanism to restore barriers in multicellular organisms upon injury. In chronic wounds, however, this program prematurely stalls. It is known that patterns of extracellular signals within the wound fluid are crucial to healing. Extracellular pH (pHe) is precisely regulated and potentially important in signaling within wounds due to its diverse cellular effects. Additionally, sufficient oxygenation is a prerequisite for cell proliferation and protein synthesis during tissue repair. It was, however, impossible to study these parameters in vivo due to the lack of imaging tools. Here, we present luminescent biocompatible sensor foils for dual imaging of pHe and oxygenation in vivo. To visualize pHe and oxygen, we used time-domain dual lifetime referencing (tdDLR) and luminescence lifetime imaging (LLI), respectively. With these dual sensors, we discovered centripetally increasing pHe-gradients on human chronic wound surfaces. In a therapeutic approach, we identify pHe-gradients as pivotal governors of cell proliferation and migration, and show that these pHe-gradients disrupt epidermal barrier repair, thus wound closure. Parallel oxygen imaging also revealed marked hypoxia, albeit with no correlating oxygen partial pressure (pO2)-gradient. This highlights the distinct role of pHe-gradients in perturbed healing. We also found that pHe-gradients on chronic wounds of humans are predominantly generated via centrifugally increasing pHe-regulatory Na+/H+-exchanger-1 (NHE1)-expression. We show that the modification of pHe on chronic wound surfaces poses a promising strategy to improve healing. The study has broad implications for cell science where spatial pHe-variations play key roles, e.g. in tumor growth. Furthermore, the novel dual sensors presented herein can be used to visualize pHe and oxygenation in various biomedical fields.
    Theranostics 04/2014; 4(7):721-735. · 7.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Primary cutaneous γ/δ T cell lymphoma (PCGD-TCL) is aggressive, and with poor prognosis. In contrast, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SPTCL) of α/β T cell receptor phenotype has been understood to follow an indolent course and have a more favorable prognosis. In the past, PCGD-TCL and SPTCL were often considered to be a manifestation of the same disease and aggressive systemic polychemotherapy has commonly been the first line therapy for both PCGD-TCL and SPTCL. Given the understanding that SPTCL is a separate and less aggressive entity, clinical data exclusively evaluating the efficacy of conservative treatment in SPTCL is needed.Objective To assess the overall clinical response to systemic corticosteroids in the treatment of SPTCL.Methods Retrospective cross-sectional study based on patients’ data repository of two tertiary care university hospitals in Zurich (Switzerland) and Tübingen (Germany). The repository spanned 13 years.ResultsIn 4 out of 5 patients (80%) with SPTCL, treatment with systemic corticosteroids induced a complete remission.Conclusions Systemic corticosteroids may be an excellent first line single agent therapy for SPTCL.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    British Journal of Dermatology 04/2014; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this randomized study, the caries-protective effect on vestibular enamel of two fluoride-containing sealants (Protecto® and Light Bond®) during multibracket treatment was investigated. In all, 40 orthodontic patients about to receive a multibracket appliance with the brackets bonded to the vestibular tooth surfaces were randomly included in this study. Each one was randomly assigned to one of four groups. A crossover design was selected in which a sealed quadrant was contralateral to an unsealed quadrant, then choosing the reverse configuration in the opposite jaw. Two sealants were, thus, tested on vestibular enamel on left and right anterior teeth and premolars in both jaws of each patient over 6 months of multibracket treatment. A DIAGNOdent® pen measuring laser fluorescence was used to analyze the relevant enamel surfaces both at baseline and after 6 months. Neither the incidence nor the characteristics of the demineralization we observed during the study differed between the 4 groups. Single application of smooth-surface sealants did not protect enamel around brackets from incipient carious lesions during the first 6 months of multibracket treatment.
    Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie 10/2013; · 0.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Plaque psoriasis is an inflammatory disease affecting approximately 2% of the population. The clinical hallmarks of psoriasis are sharply demarcated, erythematous plaques with thick scales. Photochemotherapy (psoralen plus ultraviolet A, PUVA) is one of the most effective therapies of psoriasis. The photosensitizer 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) can be applied either orally (system PUVA) or topically in a warm water bath (bath PUVA). Objectives To compare bath PUVA and system PUVA in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Methods This was a randomized, open, prospective, multicentre trial. We included 74 patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis during a 6-week treatment and a 4-week follow-up period. Of the patients enrolled in the study, 38 received bath PUVA and 36 system PUVA. ResultsBoth treatment modalities significantly reduced the median Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score in the intention-to-treat population. Within 6 weeks bath PUVA reduced the median PASI by 74% (16·4 to 4·2) while system PUVA did so by 62% (15·3 to 5·8). The difference between the two modalities was not significant with regard to treatment efficacy (P = 0·389). Conclusion There is no difference between bath PUVA and system PUVA in the treatment of psoriasis.
    British Journal of Dermatology 09/2013; 169(3). · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic hematological malignancies can present in the skin as specific secondary cutaneous lymphoma or as non-specific skin manifestations. In the majority of cases, patients are first diagnosed with a systemic lymphoma and may subsequently develop skin involvement. Rarely, the cutaneous symptoms precede the diagnosis of systemic hematological disorders. In these patients, cutaneous infiltrates can present a challenge to both the clinician and the pathologist. We report a series of five patients with clinically and histologically heterogeneous characteristics, in which careful diagnostic procedures finally led to the diagnosis of systemic hematological malignancies. Interdisciplinary clinical and laboratory examination, including histological and molecular analysis and imaging rendered possible the diagnosis of the underlying hematological malignancy. The here-described approaches allowed the diagnosis and therapy of so-far unrecognized hematological malignancies in patients initially presenting exclusively with cutaneous symptoms.
    European journal of dermatology : EJD. 06/2013;
  • M Berneburg, N J Neumann, S Karrer, T Werfel
    Der Hautarzt 05/2013; 64(5):337. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • M Berneburg, T Schwarz
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    ABSTRACT: Phototherapy represents one of the essential options in the treatment of skin diseases by dermatologists. The beginnings of phototherapy were based on empirical observations and only later the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of the different modalities of phototherapy were unravelled by scientific research. Due to these findings, some phototherapeutic indications were subsequently altered. In this article, the known photobiological effects of ultraviolet radiation will be discussed and put in relation to the different forms of phototherapy as they are applied in the daily practice by dermatologists.
    Der Hautarzt 04/2013; · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • York Kamenisch, Mark Berneburg
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    ABSTRACT: Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with progeroid symptoms, which is caused mainly by mutations in the CS genes CSA and CSB. Although the relevance of mitochondria in the aging process is known for several decades, research focused primarily on the role of the CS proteins in the nucleus. Recently, however, mitochondrial contribution to aging-associated symptoms of CS has been described. Inside mitochondria, CS proteins have roles, which partially differ from their nuclear functions. Up to now it is known that mitochondrial CS proteins are associated with base excision repair (BER) and transcription of mitochondrial DNA. However, it has been hypothesized that these are not the only functions of mitochondrial CS proteins as the occurrence of mutations like the common deletion are in need of separate explanations.
    Mechanisms of ageing and development 04/2013; · 4.18 Impact Factor
  • M. Berneburg, T. Schwarz
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    ABSTRACT: Die Phototherapie stellt eine der wesentlichen Säulen in der Behandlung von Hautkrankheiten durch den Dermatologen dar. Die Anfänge der Phototherapie waren durch empirische Beobachtungen geprägt, erst später arbeiteten wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen die molekularen und zellulären Wirkmechanismen der verschiedenen Phototherapiemodalitäten heraus. Aufgrund dieser Erkenntnisse haben sich aber auch die Indikationen der verschiedenen Behandlungsformen im Verlauf teilweise geändert. In diesem Beitrag werden die einzelnen photobiologischen Effekte von ultravioletter Strahlung besprochen und in Relation zu den verschiedenen Formen der Phototherapie gestellt, wie sie in der täglichen klinischen Praxis vom Hautarzt angewendet werden.
    Der Hautarzt 01/2013; 64(5). · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • M. Berneburg, N.J. Neumann, S. Karrer, T. Werfel
    Der Hautarzt 01/2013; 64(5). · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vitro research performed on eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell cultures usually represents the initial step for characterization of a novel photosensitizer (PS) intended for application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms. Although many experimental steps of PS testing make use of the wide spectrum of methods readily employed in cell biology, special aspects of working with photoactive substances, such as the autofluorescence of the PS molecule or the requirement of light protection, need to be considered when performing in vitro experiments in PDT/PDI. This tutorial represents a comprehensive collection of operative instructions, by which, based on photochemical and photophysical properties of a PS, its uptake into cells, the intracellular localization and photodynamic action in both tumor cells and microorganisms novel photoactive molecules may be characterized for their suitability for PDT/PDI. Furthermore, it shall stimulate the efforts to expand the convincing benefits of photodynamic therapy and photodynamic inactivation within both established and new fields of applications and motivate scientists of all disciplines to get involved in photodynamic research.
    BioMed research international. 01/2013; 2013:840417.
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    ABSTRACT: The guest editors are grateful to all referees who devoted considerable time and effort to maintain the high scientific standard of this special issue by their excellent and constructive comments on the papers.
    BioMed research international. 01/2013; 2013:161362.
  • L. Krieger, M. Berneburg
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    ABSTRACT: The occurrence of abnormally pigmented skin lesions is a common phenomenon and often associated with the influence of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and other sources of DNA damage. Pigmentary lesions induced by UV radiation and other sources of DNA damage occur in healthy individuals, but human diseases with defective DNA repair represent important models which allow the investigation of possible underlying molecular mechanisms leading to hypo- and hyperpigmentations. There are several hereditary diseases which are known to go along with genetic defects of DNA repair mechanisms comprising Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), Trichothiodystrophy (TTD), Werner syndrome (WS), Bloom syndrome (BS), Fanconi anemia (FA) and Ataxia telangiectasia (AT). These diseases share clinical characteristics including poikilodermatic skin changes such as hypo-and hyperpigmentation. Since UV radiation is the most common source of DNA damage which can cause pigmentary lesions both in healthy individuals and in patients with genetic deficiency in DNA repair, in the present article, we focus on pigmentary lesions in patients with XP as an example of a disease associated with genetic defects in DNA repair.
    Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 11/2012; 139:S78–S82. · 0.60 Impact Factor
  • L Krieger, M Berneburg
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    ABSTRACT: The occurrence of abnormally pigmented skin lesions is a common phenomenon and often associated with the influence of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and other sources of DNA damage. Pigmentary lesions induced by UV radiation and other sources of DNA damage occur in healthy individuals, but human diseases with defective DNA repair represent important models which allow the investigation of possible underlying molecular mechanisms leading to hypo- and hyperpigmentations. There are several hereditary diseases which are known to go along with genetic defects of DNA repair mechanisms comprising Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), Trichothiodystrophy (TTD), Werner syndrome (WS), Bloom syndrome (BS), Fanconi anemia (FA) and Ataxia telangiectasia (AT). These diseases share clinical characteristics including poikilodermatic skin changes such as hypo-and hyperpigmentation. Since UV radiation is the most common source of DNA damage which can cause pigmentary lesions both in healthy individuals and in patients with genetic deficiency in DNA repair, in the present article, we focus on pigmentary lesions in patients with XP as an example of a disease associated with genetic defects in DNA repair.
    Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 11/2012; 139S3:S78-S82. · 0.60 Impact Factor
  • M Berneburg, B Koos, R Kratochwil, A Godt
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present work was to evaluate different head positions for their effects on cephalometric analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cephalograms were obtained from a skull phantom adjusted to various degrees of inclination (0°, 2°, 4°, 6°, 8°, 10°), lateral tilting (0°, 2°, 4°, 6°, 8°, 10°), and rotation (0°, 3°, 6°, 9°, 12°, 15°, and 21°). All these combinations resulted in a total of 210 digital cephalograms for assessment. On-screen analysis of these images by an orthodontist was completed within a few days. RESULTS: Lateral tilting and rotation revealed considerably stronger effects on the values measured than inclination. Starting at 2° of tilting or 3° of rotation, numerous parameters yielded deviations of ≥ 2° or 2 mm from the baseline values. Increasing degrees of rotation showed more pronounced value changes than increasing degrees of lateral tilting. Skeletal and dental parameters whose landmarks are mainly located in the median plane were less susceptible than parameters whose reference points had to be averaged. Values of parameters located in the median plane were less affected by rotation when combined with higher degrees of initial lateral tilting (> 6°) than with lower ones. CONCLUSION: The usefulness of cephalometric data becomes limited once the head is rotated by 3° or laterally tilted by 2°. Values obtained in the median plane are more stable than those obtained in peripheral locations. Various degrees of inclination applied to the skull phantom with its solid structures had no measurable effects. Accurate head positioning is an essential prerequisite for obtaining meaningful results from cephalograms based on reproducibly identifiable landmarks.
    Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie 10/2012; · 0.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The skin, hair and nail changes in four distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are compared and reviewed. These syndromes comprise Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome; ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome; ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome. A comprehensive overview of the dermatological signs and symptoms in these syndromes was generated from the database of the Ectodermal Dysplasia Network Germany, the clinical findings in the patients seen in our department and an extensive review of the literature. The findings included abnormalities of skin, sweating, hair and nails. These clinical findings are discussed in relation to the underlying molecular defects known to play a role in these four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes.
    European journal of dermatology : EJD. 07/2012; 22(5):605-13.
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective cross-sectional study design was performed to define reference values for the facial surfaces of 3-6-year-old boys and girls using three-dimensional surface cephalometry. A total of 2290 standardized three-dimensional facial images from 3 to 6-year-old preschool children were separated by gender and assigned to four age categories. All children were Caucasian and revealed no evidence of dentofacial abnormalities. On each image, 31 cephalometric landmarks were marked, resulting in 35 (19 frontal, six lateral, 10 paired) distances and eight angles. Differences between age groups and genders were calculated and significances detected. A base table with reference values was compiled, which indicated that boys showed higher values than age-matched girls and that measured distances increased with age. The mean values from this study could be compiled as a reference table for three-dimensional facial analysis in Caucasian children aged 3-6 years. Such a reference table could be used in comparative studies with other populations or children with craniofacial malformations.
    Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research 05/2012; 15(2):103-16. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human genome is constantly exposed to various sources of DNA damage. Ineffective protection from this damage leads to genetic instability which can ultimately give rise to somatic disease, causing mutations. Therefore our organism commands a number of highly conserved and effective mechanisms responsible for DNA repair. If these repair mechanisms are defective due to germline mutations in relevant genes, rare diseases with DNA repair deficiencies can arise. Today, a limited number of rare hereditary diseases characterized by genetic defects of DNA repair mechanisms is known, comprising ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Werner syndrome, Bloom Syndrome, Fanconi anemia, xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, trichothiodystrophy. Although heterogeneous in respect to selected symptoms, these rare disorders share many clinical features such as growth retardation, neurological disorders, premature ageing, skin alterations including abnormal pigmentation, telangiectasia, xerosis cutis, pathological wound healing as well as an increased risk of developing different types of cancer. Based on the clinical similarities of symptoms as well as the predominant diagnostic technology available, many of these rare disorders were formerly classified as genodermatoses with cancer predisposition or chromosomal breakage symptoms. These pathological conditions not only severely impair patients with these rare genetic diseases but also represent symptoms affecting large parts of the general population.
    European journal of dermatology : EJD. 03/2012; 22(4):443-55.
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    ABSTRACT: Three-dimensional (3D) integration of a maxillary model into a facial model has only been possible by a complex procedure using face bow transfer after taking impressions of certain maxillary and facial parts. In this study, we aimed to develop a method for integrating a scanned maxillary model into a scan-realized facial model. A total of 19 patients with the medical indication for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and orthodontic treatment were included in this study. Facial and maxillary scans were also taken. The construction of the integrated surface model required 10 steps. This integration procedure was evaluated by taking ten 3D dentofacial linear segment measurements in the integrated scan and the CBCT. These results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. All measurements demonstrated good intra-individual reliability. We observed almost perfect congruence between integrated scan and CBCT in vertical distances, while the sagittal measurements revealed more, yet clinically acceptable, deviations possibly caused by different error sources in either of the two methods. This new method is suitable for generating 3D integrated surface-scan models which can be used for growth and therapy control studies in orthodontics and other disciplines in the dentofacial fields. Since this method does not require ionizing radiation, it is highly recommendable as an application for children and adolescent patients.
    Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie 03/2012; 73(2):126-37. · 0.89 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
372.20 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Universität Regensburg
      • Department of Dermatology and Venereology
      Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany
    • University Hospital Regensburg
      Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2004–2013
    • University of Tuebingen
      • Department of Dermatology
      Tübingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
  • 2012
    • Universität Ulm
      • Clinic of Neurology
      Ulm, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
  • 1997–2008
    • Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
      • • Institut für Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) an der HHU
      • • Hautklinik
      Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2003
    • Hohenheim University
      • Institute of Biological Chemistry and Nutrition Sciences
      Stuttgart, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
    • Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
      • Klinik für Hämatologie, Onkologie und Klinische Immunologie
      Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2002
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      • Department of Toxicogenetics
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2000–2001
    • University of Sussex
      • Centre for Genome Damage and Stability
      Brighton, ENG, United Kingdom