Tamson V Moore

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (18)85.01 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gata5 is a transcription factor expressed in the lung, but whose physiological role is unknown. To test whether and how Gata5 regulates airway constrictor responsiveness, we studied Gata5-/-, Gata5+/-, and WT mice on the C57BL/6J background. Cholinergic airway constrictor responsiveness was assessed invasively in mice without and with induction of allergic airway inflammation through ovalbumin sensitization and aerosol exposure. Gata5 deficient mice displayed native airway constrictor hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in the absence of allergen-induced inflammation. Gata5 deficient mice retained their relatively greater constrictor responsiveness even in ovalbumin-induced experimental asthma. Gata5 deficiency did not alter the distribution of cell types in BAL fluid, but bronchial epithelial mucus metaplasia was more prominent in Gata5-/- mice after allergen challenge. Gene expression profiles revealed that apolipoprotein E was the fifth most down-regulated transcript in Gata5 deficient lungs, and quantitative RT-PCR and immunostaining confirmed reduced apoE expression in Gata5-/- mice. qRT-PCR also revealed increased IL-13 mRNA in the lungs of Gata5 deficient mice. These findings for the first time show that Gata5 regulates apoE and IL-13 expression in vivo and that its deletion causes AHR. Gata5 deficient mice exhibit an airway phenotype that closely resembles that previously reported for apoE-/- mice: Both exhibit cholinergic AHR in native and experimental asthma states, and there is excessive goblet cell metaplasia after allergen sensitization and challenge. The Gata5-deficient phenotype also shares features with that previously reported for IL-13-treated mice. Together, these results indicate that Gata5 deficiency induces AHR at least in part by blunting apoE and increasing IL-13 expression.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 11/2013; · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T cell migration toward sites of antigen exposure is mediated by G protein signaling and is a key function in the development of immune responses. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins modulate G protein signaling; however, their role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses has not been thoroughly explored. Herein we demonstrated abundant expression of the Gi/Gq-specific RGS3 in activated T cells, and that diminished RGS3 expression in a T cell thymoma increased cytokine-induced migration. To examine the role of endogenous RGS3 in vivo, mice deficient in the RGS-domain (RGS3(ΔRGS) ) were generated and tested in an experimental model of asthma. Compared to littermate controls, the inflammation in the RGS3(ΔRGS) mice was characterized by increased T cell numbers and the striking development of perivascular lymphoid-structures. Surprisingly, while innate inflammatory cells were also increased in the lungs of RGS3(ΔRGS) mice, eosinophil numbers and Th2 cytokine production was equivalent to control mice. In contrast, T cell numbers in the draining lymph nodes (dLN) were reduced in the RGS3(ΔRGS) demonstrating a redistribution of T cells from the dLN to the lungs via increased RGS3(ΔRGS) T cell migration. Together these novel findings show a non-redundant role for endogenous RGS3 in controlling T cell migration in vitro and in an in vivo model of inflammation.
    AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 09/2013; · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute rejection, a common complication of lung transplantation, may promote obliterative bronchiolitis leading to graft failure in lung transplant recipients. During acute rejection episodes, CD8(+) T cells can contribute to lung epithelial injury but the mechanisms promoting and controlling CD8-mediated injury in the lung are not well understood. To study the mechanisms regulating CD8(+) T cell-mediated lung rejection, we used a transgenic model in which adoptively transferred ovalbumin (OVA)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induce lung injury in mice expressing an ovalbumin transgene in the small airway epithelium of the lungs (CC10-OVA mice). The lung pathology is similar to findings in humans with acute lung transplant. In the presence of an intact immune response the inflammation resolves by day 30. Using CC10-OVA.RAG(-/-) mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells and ICOS(+/+) T cells were required for protection against lethal lung injury, while neutrophil depletion was not protective. In addition, CD4(+)Foxp3 (+) ICOS(+) T cells were enriched in the lungs of animals surviving lung injury and ICOS(+/+) Tregs promoted survival in animals that received ICOS(-/-) T cells. Direct comparison of ICOS(-/-) Tregs to ICOS(+/+) Tregs found defects in vitro but no differences in the ability of ICOS(-/-) Tregs to protect from lethal lung injury. These data suggest that ICOS affects Treg development but is not necessarily required for Treg effector function.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e72955. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD8(+) T cell responses have been shown to be regulated by dendritic cells (DCs) and CD4(+) T cells, leading to the tenet that CD8(+) T cells play a passive role in their own differentiation. In contrast, by using a DNA vaccination model, to separate the events of vaccination from those of CD8(+) T cell priming, we demonstrate that CD8(+) T cells, themselves, actively limit their own memory potential through CD8(+) T cell-derived IFN-γ-dependent modification of the IL-12/IL-15Rα axis on DCs. Such CD8(+) T cell-driven cytokine alterations result in increased T-bet and decreased Bcl-2 expression, and thus decreased memory progenitor formation. These results identify an unrecognized role for CD8(+) T cells in the regulation of their own effector differentiation fate and a previously uncharacterized relationship between the balance of inflammation and memory formation.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2012; 188(8):3639-47. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD4-unhelped CD8(+) T cells are functionally defective T cells primed in the absence of CD4(+) T cell help. Given the co-stimulatory role of natural-killer group 2, member D protein (NKG2D) on CD8(+) T cells, we investigated its ability to rescue these immunologically impotent cells. We demonstrate that augmented co-stimulation through NKG2D during priming paradoxically rescues memory, but not effector, CD8(+) T cell responses. NKG2D-mediated rescue is characterized by reversal of elevated transcription factor T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) expression and recovery of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ production and cytolytic responses. Rescue is abrogated in CD8(+) T cells lacking NKG2D. Augmented co-stimulation through NKG2D confers a high rate of survival to mice lacking CD4(+) T cells in a CD4-dependent influenza model and rescues HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses from CD4-deficient HIV-positive donors. These findings demonstrate that augmented co-stimulation through NKG2D is effective in rescuing CD4-unhelped CD8(+) T cells from their pathophysiological fate and may provide therapeutic benefits.
    Nature medicine 01/2012; 18(3):422-8. · 27.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we demonstrate that engagement of two different natural killer receptors (NKRs) can lead to contrasting effects in the development of self-reactive CD8+T cells and autoimmune vitiligo. Specifically, using a mouse model, we show that CD8+T-cell targeting of a melanocyte antigen, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) in combination with delivery of the NKG2D ligands (Rae-1ϵ or H60), results in strong CD8+T-cell responses against TRP-1 and in the development of autoimmune vitiligo. In contrast, targeting of TRP-1 in combination with delivery of CD48, the natural ligand for the NKR 2B4, leads to reduced formation of TRP-1-reactive CD8+T-cell responses and decreased development of vitiligo. These data indicate that autoimmune vitiligo is limited by insufficient signals, despite plentiful self-reactive T cells in the peripheral immune system. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence supporting the role of NKRs in modulating CD8+T-cell autoimmune vitiligo. This study supports the utilization of NKR signaling as a therapeutic avenue toward prevention of vitiligo and other autoimmune diseases.
    Autoimmunity 09/2011; 44(8):599-606. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While the effects of TCR affinity and TGFβ on CD8(+) T-cell function have been studied individually, the manner in which TCR affinity dictates susceptibility to TGFβ-mediated suppression remains unknown. To address this issue, we utilized OVA altered peptide ligands (APLs) of different affinities in the OT-I model. We demonstrate that while decreased TCR ligand affinity initially results in weakened responses, such interactions prime the resultant effector cells to respond more strongly to cognate antigen upon secondary exposure. Despite this, responses by CD8(+) T cells primed with lower-affinity TCR ligands are more effectively regulated by TGFβ. Susceptibility to TGFβ-mediated suppression is associated with downregulation of RGS3, a recently recognized negative regulator of TGFβ signaling, but not expression of TGFβ receptors I/II. These results suggest a novel tolerance mechanism whereby CD8(+) T cells are discriminately regulated by TGFβ according to the affinity of the ligand on which they were initially primed. In addition, because of the major role played by TGFβ in tumor-induced immune suppression, these results identify the affinity of the priming ligand as a primary concern in CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cancer immunotherapeutic strategies.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 06/2011; 60(11):1543-51. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We and others reported that inducible costimulator-deficient (ICOS(-/-)) mice manifest a defect in Th2-mediated airway inflammation, which was attributed to reduced Th2 differentiation in the absence of ICOS signaling. Interestingly, the number of CD4 T cells present in the airways and lungs after sensitization and challenge is significantly reduced in ICOS(-/-) mice. We now show that this reduction is not attributable simply to a reduced proliferation of ICOS(-/-) cells, because significantly more ICOS(-/-) than wild-type activated CD4 T cells are present in the lymph nodes, suggesting that more ICOS(-/-) CD4 T cells than wild-type CD4 T cells migrated into the lymph nodes. Further investigation revealed that activated ICOS(-/-) CD4 T cells express higher concentrations of the lymph node homing receptors, CCR7 and CD62L, than do wild-type CD4 T cells, leading to a preferential return of ICOS(-/-) cells to the nondraining lymph nodes rather than the lungs. Blocking reentry into the lymph nodes after the initiation of Th2-mediated airway inflammation equalized the levels of CD4 and granulocyte infiltration in the lungs of wild-type and ICOS(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that in wild-type CD4 T cells, co-stimulation with ICOS promotes the down-regulation of CCR7 and CD62L after activation, leading to a reduced return of activated CD4 T cells to the lymph nodes and a more efficient entry into the lungs.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 03/2011; 45(4):843-50. · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Memory CD4 T cells play a vital role in protection against re-infection by pathogens as diverse as helminthes or influenza viruses. Inducible costimulator (ICOS) is highly expressed on memory CD4 T cells and has been shown to augment proliferation and survival of activated CD4 T cells. However, the role of ICOS costimulation on the development and maintenance of memory CD4 T cells remains controversial. Herein, we describe a significant defect in the number of effector memory (EM) phenotype cells in ICOS(-/-) and ICOSL(-/-) mice that becomes progressively more dramatic as the mice age. This decrease was not due to a defect in the homeostatic proliferation of EM phenotype CD4 T cells in ICOS(-/-) or ICOSL(-/-) mice. To determine whether ICOS regulated the development or survival of EM CD4 T cells, we utilized an adoptive transfer model. We found no defect in development of EM CD4 T cells, but long-term survival of ICOS(-/-) EM CD4 T cells was significantly compromised compared to wild-type cells. The defect in survival was specific to EM cells as the central memory (CM) ICOS(-/-) CD4 T cells persisted as well as wild type cells. To determine the physiological consequences of a specific defect in EM CD4 T cells, wild-type and ICOS(-/-) mice were infected with influenza virus. ICOS(-/-) mice developed significantly fewer influenza-specific EM CD4 T cells and were more susceptible to re-infection than wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a role for ICOS costimulation in the maintenance of EM but not CM CD4 T cells.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(2):e16529. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Autumn Immunology Conference; 11/2009
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous studies revealed that, in a murine model of asthma, mice that received Fas-deficient T cells developed a prolonged phase of airway inflammation, mucus production, and airway hyperreactivity that failed to resolve even 6 weeks after the last challenge. To investigate how Fas-Fas ligand (FasL) interaction occurs between T cells and other cells in vivo, Gld mice with abnormalities of the FasL signaling pathway were used. The reconstituted mice were made by transferring T cells from B6 or Gld mice to Rag(-/-) or FasL-deficient Rag(-/-) mice. We found that Rag(-/-) mice that received B6 T cells resolved the airway inflammation, whereas FasL-deficient Rag(-/-) mice that received Gld T cells developed a prolonged airway inflammation at Day 28, with decreased IFN-gamma production. Both FasL-deficient Rag(-/-) mice that received B6 T cells and Rag(-/-) mice that received Gld T cells also had completely resolved their airway inflammation by Day 28 after challenge. Interestingly, FasL-deficient Rag(-/-) mice that received Gld T cells eventually resolved airway inflammation at Day 42, with a similar level of IFN-gamma production to that of control group. These results demonstrate that FasL expression on either T cells only or non-T cells only was sufficient for the eventual resolution of airway inflammation, and the prolonged airway inflammation in FasL-deficient Rag(-/-) mice that received Gld T cells was correlated with decreased IFN-gamma production by Gld T cells.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 10/2009; 43(3):342-8. · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous work has shown ICOS can function independently of CD28, but whether either molecule can compensate for the other in vivo is not known. Since ICOS is a potent inducer of Th2 cytokines and linked to allergy and elevated serum IgE in humans, we hypothesized that augmenting ICOS costimulation in murine allergic airway disease may overcome CD28 deficiency. While ICOS was expressed on T cells from CD28(-/-) mice, Th2-mediated airway inflammation was not induced in CD28(-/-) mice by increased ICOS costimulation. Further, we determined if augmenting CD28 costimulation could compensate for ICOS deficiency. ICOS(-/-) mice had a defect in airway eosinophilia that was not overcome by augmenting CD28 costimulation. CD28 costimulation also did not fully compensate for ICOS for antibody responses, germinal center formation or the development of follicular B helper T cells. CD28 and ICOS play complementary non-overlapping roles in the development of Th2 immunity in vivo.
    Cellular Immunology 08/2009; 259(2):177-84. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effective immunotherapy using T cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T cells requires an understanding of the relationship between TCR affinity and functional avidity of T cells. In this study, we evaluate the relative affinity of two TCRs isolated from HLA-A2-restricted, gp100-reactive T cell clones with extremely high functional avidity. Furthermore, one of these T cell clones, was CD4−CD8− indicating that antigen recognition by this clone was CD8 independent. However, when these TCRs were expressed in CD8− Jurkat cells, the resulting Jurkat cells recognized gp100:209–217 peptide loaded T2 cells and had high functional avidity, but could not recognize HLA-A2+ melanoma cells expressing gp100. Tumor cell recognition by Jurkat cells expressing these TCRs could not be induced by exogenously loading the tumor cells with the native gp100:209–217 peptide. These results indicate that functional avidity of a T cell does not necessarily correlate with TCR affinity and CD8-independent antigen recognition by a T cell does not always mean its TCR will transfer CD8-independence to other effector cells. The implications of these findings are that T cells can modulate their functional avidity independent of the affinity of their TCRs.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 05/2009; 58(5):719-728. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inducible Costimulator (ICOS) is an important regulator of Th2 lymphocyte function and a potential immunotherapeutic target for allergy and asthma. A SNP in the ICOS 5' promoter in humans is associated with increased atopy and serum IgE in a founder population and increased ICOS surface expression and Th2 cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, it is unknown if increased ICOS expression contributes to disease progression or is a result of disease pathology. We developed a mouse model in which ICOS surface expression levels are genetically predetermined to test our hypothesis that genetic regulation of ICOS expression controls the severity of Th2 responses in vivo. Using ICOS+/+ and ICOS+/- mice in a Th2 model of airway inflammation, we found that T cells from the ICOS+/- mice had reduced ICOS expression and decreased Th2-mediated inflammation in vivo. Although the activation status of the T cells did not differ, T cells isolated from the lungs and draining lymph nodes of ICOS+/- mice at the peak of inflammation produced less Th2 cytokines upon stimulation ex vivo. Using 4get mice, which express GFP upon IL-4 transcription, we determined that the decreased Th2 cytokines in ICOS+/- is due to reduced percentage of Th2 cells and not a defect in their ability to produce IL-4. These data suggest that in both mice and humans, the level of ICOS surface expression regulates the magnitude of the in vivo Th2 response, perhaps by influencing Th2 differentiation.
    PLoS ONE 01/2009; 4(11):e7525. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The immune attack against malignant tumors require the concerted action of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) as well as CD4+ T helper cells. The contribution of T cell receptor (TCR) alphabeta+ CD4- CD8- double-negative (DN) T cells to anti-tumor immune responses is widely unknown. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that DN T cells with a broad TCR repertoire are present in humans in the peripheral blood and the lymph nodes of healthy individuals. Here, we characterize a human DN T cell clone (T4H2) recognizing an HLA-A2-restricted melanoma-associated antigenic gp100-peptide isolated from the peripheral blood of a melanoma patient. Antigen recognition by the T4H2 DN clone resulted in specific secretion of IFN-gamma and TNF. Although lacking the CD8 molecule the gp100-specific DN T cell clone was able to confer antigen-specific cytotoxicity against gp100-loaded target cells as well as HLA-A2+ gp100 expressing melanoma cells. The cytotoxic capacity was found to be perforin/granzymeB-dependent. Together, these data indicate that functionally active antigen-specific DN T cells recognizing MHC class I-restricted tumor-associated antigen (TAA) may contribute to anti-tumor immunity in vivo.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 11/2008; 58(5):709-18. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The T cell costimulatory molecule ICOS regulates Th2 effector function in allergic airway disease. Recently, several studies with ICOS(-/-) mice have also demonstrated a role for ICOS in Th2 differentiation. To determine the effects of ICOS on the early immune response, we investigated augmenting ICOS costimulation in a Th2-mediated immune response to Schistosoma mansoni Ags. We found that augmenting ICOS costimulation with B7RP-1-Fc increased the accumulation of T and B cells in the draining lymph nodes postimmunization. Interestingly, the increased numbers were due in part to increased migration of undivided Ag-specific TCR transgenic T cells and surprisingly B cells, as well as non-TCR transgenic T cells. B7RP-1-Fc also increased the levels of the chemokines CCL21 and CXCL13 in the draining lymph node, suggesting ICOS costimulation contributes to migration by direct or indirect effects on dendritic cells, stromal cells and high endothelial venules. Further, the effects of B7RP-1-Fc were not dependent on immunization. Our data support a model in which ICOS costimulation augments the pool of lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, leading to an increase in the frequency of potentially reactive T and B cells.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2008; 181(2):1019-24. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HLA-A2/K(b) transgenic mice have been powerful tools for studying HLA-A2-restricted anti-tumor immunity. Two tumor lines were established from an aged HLA-A2/K(b) transgenic mouse that developed spontaneous tumors in the right limb and lung. Histopathologic analysis of the tumor was consistent with an osteosarcoma that had metastasized to the lung. The cells from the primary tumor and the lung metastasis were adapted to culture and are designated Ag201P and Ag201M, respectively. Both Ag201P and Ag201M induced tumors in mice, indicating that the established cell lines are tumorigenic. Both tumor lines expressed HLA-A2/K(b) as assessed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Furthermore, the HLA-A2/K(b) molecules were functional on both tumor lines as demonstrated by their ability to present exogenously loaded HLA-A2-restricted peptides to human HLA-A2-restricted T cells. More importantly, endogenously expressed HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were processed and presented in the context of HLA-A2/K(b) in Ag201P and Ag201M cells to human HLA-A2-restricted T cells. Thus, Ag201P and Ag201M are two new murine tumor lines that express functional HLA-A2/K(b), and represent potentially invaluable tools to study HLA-A2-restricted anti-tumor immunity in mice.
    Cancer Letters 07/2005; 224(1):153-66. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the wealth of information that has been acquired regarding the way T cells recognize their targets, we are left with far more questions than answers regarding how to manipulate the immune response to better treat cancer patients. Clearly, most patients have a broad repertoire of T cells capable of recognizing their tumor cells. Despite the presence of these tumor reactive T cells and our ability to increase their frequency though vaccination or adoptive transfer, patients still progress. From the T cell side, defects in T cell signaling may account for much of our failure to achieve significant numbers of objective clinical responses. In spite of these negatives, the horizon does remain bright for T cell based immune therapy of cancer. The periodic objective clinical response tells us that immune therapy can work. Now that we know that cancer patients have the capacity to mount immune responses against their tumors, current and future investigations with agents which alter T cell function combined with vaccination or adoptive T cell transfer may help tip the balance towards effective immune therapies.
    Cancer treatment and research 02/2005; 123:37-59.

Publication Stats

67 Citations
85.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • University of Chicago
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Medicine
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2012
    • Loyola University Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2009
    • Medical University of South Carolina
      Charleston, South Carolina, United States
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy
      Chicago, IL, United States