Beth L Tieman

Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States

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Publications (9)18 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our aim was to describe how the probability of walking, wheeled mobility, and assisted mobility changes with environmental setting and age in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). The parents of a population-based sample of 642 children and adolescents (360 males, 282 females; age range 16mo-21y) reported their children's mobility at home, school, and outdoors at 6- or 12-month intervals a mean of 5.2 times. Generalized mixed-effects analyses were used to model the probabilities. By age 3 years, children with motor function classified as level I according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) walked in all three settings. Children/adolescents classified as level V used assisted mobility, with a small number using wheeled mobility. In the case of children classified as GMFCS level II, the probability of walking varied with the environmental setting, which, at age 18, is outdoors 90% of the time. Among children classified as GMFCS level III, the probability of walking was highest at age 9 at school (68%), and at age 18 was approximately 50% in all three settings. Among children/adolescents rated as GMFCS level IV, the probability of wheeled mobility increased with age and, at age 18, 57% of mobility took place outdoors. The results provide evidence that age and environmental setting influence method of mobility of children/adolescents with CP. The method that is preferred in one setting may not be preferred in another setting or at another age.
    Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 09/2009; 52(1):66-71. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the variability in mobility of children with cerebral palsy (CP) within classification levels. The subjects were 183 children with CP, ages six to 12 years, at Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels II to IV. Parents reported their child's mobility methods in the home, school, and outdoors/community. Mobility methods were ranked using empirical data and reflect trunk and lower extremity motor control requirements. These ranks were used for Friedman analysis of variance and post-hoc analyses for each GMFCS level. Children within the same GMFCS level exhibited varying degrees of independence in mobility methods, which differed across setting. Children usually performed higher-ranked mobility methods (requiring the most gross motor control) at home, lower-ranked mobility methods at school, and the lowest ranked mobility methods in the outdoors/community. Contextual, environmental, and personal factors may explain these findings. Therapists are encouraged to examine contextual features in everyday settings when planning interventions to improve functional mobility.
    Pediatric Physical Therapy 02/2007; 19(3):180-7. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this special interest report is to describe the outcomes of a research round table discussion regarding the physical therapy management of mobility for children with spastic diplegia. DESCRIPTION: Sixty-two pediatric physical therapists and physical therapists assistants participated in focus groups during the Research Round Table at the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) 1999 Combined Sections Meeting. A case description of a child with spastic diplegia and guiding questions were used to facilitate discussion. SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE: Common practices in patient management across the child's life-span emerged from the discussion. Practices in examination, evaluation and prognosis, and intervention differed depending on the age and function of the child and the family's needs. In general, therapists reported that younger children receive examinations that include standardized tests of development and ongoing intervention with a frequency of one to five times per week. In contrast, older children receive therapy services on an episodic basis that address their specific needs. The elements of patient management served as a useful framework for exploring decision making. IMPORTANCE TO PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL THERAPY: The information compiled from this project needs to be validated through systematic inquiry. Therapists may, however, use the practices reported here to reflect on their clinical decision making and to identify questions for further exploration. This descriptive document is the first step in the development of a guideline for evidence-based practice. The development of such a clinical guideline could serve as an education tool for novice therapists, a program evaluation tool to ensure quality care, and a foundation for future research to promote evidence-based practice.
    Pediatric Physical Therapy 02/2005; 17(1):46-54. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The process of identification of children with delays or disorders in motor development includes developmental screening, examination, and reexamination. Throughout this process, various types of measures are used, including discriminative and evaluative measures. Discriminative and evaluative measures of motor development and function that are commonly used for preschool-aged children include the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II, Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, 2nd edition, Toddler and Infant Motor Evaluation, Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, and Gross Motor Function Measure. Selecting an appropriate measure is a crucial part of the examination process and should be geared toward the purpose of testing and characteristics of the child. Evidence of reliability and validity are important considerations for selection of a measure.
    Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews 02/2005; 11(3):189-96. · 3.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mobility of children with cerebral palsy (CP) has generally been examined in terms of capability (what a child can do) in a controlled environment, rather than performance (what a child does do) in everyday settings. The purpose of this study was to compare gross motor capability and performance across environmental settings in children with CP. The subjects were 307 children with CP, aged 6 to 12 years, who were randomly selected across Ontario, Canada. Children were grouped by capability (the highest of 3 items achieved on the Gross Motor Function Measure). Performance was measured via a parent-completed questionnaire on usual mobility methods in the home, at school, and in the outdoors or community. There were statistically significant differences in performance across settings for children in all capability groups. Children who were capable of crawling performed crawling more at home than at school or in the outdoors or community. Children who were capable of walking with support performed walking with support more at school than in the outdoors or community. Children who were capable of walking alone performed walking alone more at home than at school or in the outdoors or community, and more at school than in the outdoors or community. The results provide evidence that children with CP with similar capability demonstrate differences in performance across settings. The results suggest that physical therapists should examine performance in the settings that are important to the child's daily life.
    Physical Therapy 06/2004; 84(5):419-29. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined changes in mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy (CP) over time and across environmental settings. Sixty-two children with CP, ages 6-14 years and classified as levels II-IV on the Gross Motor Function Classification System, were randomly selected from a larger data base and followed for three to four years. On each of several assessments, parents completed a questionnaire on their child's usual mobility methods in the home, school, and outdoors/community settings. During the first assessment interval, mobility methods increased to methods requiring more gross motor control. During the second assessment interval, mobility methods were unchanged or decreased to methods requiring less gross motor control. Changes within the child and within the environment are hypothesized to occur and to impact changes in mobility methods. Screening at regular intervals is recommended to monitor changes in mobility. Interventions to enhance mobility may be indicated during periods of change in the child or exposure to new environments.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 02/2004; 24(1-2):109-28. · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to: (1) describe the usual mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at home, school, and outdoors or in the community and (2) examine whether children with CP are more dependent on adult assistance for mobility in certain settings. The participants were a stratified random sample of 636 children with CP (355 males and 281 females; 2 to 12 years of age, mean 6.8 years SD 2.7), receiving rehabilitation services in Ontario, Canada. Children were grouped by age and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level. Among the five levels of the GMFCS, there were 185 children classified at level I, 81 children at level II, 113 children at level III, 132 children at level IV, and 125 children at level V. Information on children's usual mobility was obtained by parent report. The results of logistic regression indicated that compared with the school setting, children were more dependent on adult assistance for mobility when outdoors/in the community and less dependent at home. The majority of children aged from 4 to 12 years at levels III to V used wheelchair mobility at school and outdoors or in the community, however, only a small percentage self-propelled their wheelchair or used powered mobility. Of the children aged 4 to 12 years at level V, 39% were carried at home. The findings suggest that environmental setting is an important consideration for assessment and intervention to improve mobility of children with CP. For children who do not walk, attention should be given to the needs of caregivers and factors that are important for successful powered mobility.
    Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 03/2003; 45(2):113-20. · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to: (1) describe the usual mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at home, school, and outdoors or in the community and (2) examine whether children with CP are more dependent on adult assistance for mobility in certain settings. The participants were a stratified random sample of 636 children with CP (355 males and 281 females; 2 to 12 years of age, mean 6.8 years SD 2.7), receiving rehabilitation services in Ontario, Canada. Children were grouped by age and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level. Among the five levels of the GMFCS, there were 185 children classified at level I, 81 children at level II, 113 children at level III, 132 children at level IV, and 125 children at level V. Information on children's usual mobility was obtained by parent report. The results of logistic regression indicated that compared with the school setting, children were more dependent on adult assistance for mobility when outdoors/in the community and less dependent at home. The majority of children aged from 4 to 12 years at levels III to V used wheelchair mobility at school and outdoors or in the community, however, only a small percentage self-propelled their wheelchair or used powered mobility. Of the children aged 4 to 12 years at level V, 39% were carried at home. The findings suggest that environmental setting is an important consideration for assessment and intervention to improve mobility of children with CP. For children who do not walk, attention should be given to the needs of caregivers and factors that are important for successful powered mobility.
    Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 01/2003; 45(2):113 - 120. · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy. 01/1999; 11(4).

Publication Stats

191 Citations
18.00 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Drexel University
      • Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 2004–2007
    • Georgia State University
      • Division of Physical Therapy
      Atlanta, GA, United States