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Publications (6)10.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100,000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100,000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100,000 workers. Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.
    Medicina Clínica 02/2006; 126(1):13-4. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objective To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Method Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Results Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100 000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100 000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100 000 workers. Conclusion Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.
    Medicina Clinica - MED CLIN. 01/2006; 126(1):13-14.
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) has important public health implications. The results of the first European multi-centre study that measured ETS exposure in a range of public places (transport, educational settings, and leisure facilities such as bars and restaurants) are presented. Nicotine vapour phase was measured using ETS passive samplers containing a filter treated with sodium bisulfate. Bars and discos are the places with the highest concentrations of nicotine from ETS, median ranging from 19 to 122 microg/m(3). Restaurants had the next highest values. Concentrations of nicotine generally range from 0.1-5 microg/m(3) in airports, and from 0.5-10 microg/m(3) in train stations. Nicotine was also found in schools and universities, yet schools tended to have the lowest concentrations compared to all the other public places sampled. In hospitals levels were generally below 5 microg/m(3). Although there is some variability between cities, this study shows that tobacco smoke is present in most of the studied public places. The study also showed that in areas where smoking is prohibited, concentrations of nicotine are lower than in areas where smoking is allowed but they are not zero. The results of this study indicate that policies should be implemented that would effectively reduce levels of tobacco smoke in public areas.
    Tobacco control 03/2005; 14(1):60-3. · 3.85 Impact Factor
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    Tobacco Control 02/2005; 14(1):60-63. · 4.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Measurements of the environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in public places in Florence. This study was part of the first European multicenter project, intended to measure ETS exposure in public places in a number of European Cities (Florence, Barcelona, Paris, Oporto, Athens, Wien and Orebro). Nicotine vapour phase was measured using passive samplers, composed of a sodium bisulphate treated filter held in a plastic cassette with a windscreen on one side. The filters were analysed at the Laboratory of the Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Spain, by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Nicotine concentration (in microg/m3) by public place, by smoking policy, and, for restaurants with separated areas, by smoking and non-smoking section. Nicotine measurements were conducted in 5 schools, 3 university departments, 5 hospitals, 1 railway station, 1 airport, 7 bars, 7 restaurants, and 4 discotheques in Florence. The average nicotine concentration in discotheques and restaurants were respectively 26.78 microg/m3 and 2.32 microg/m3. In the other public places the concentration was about 1 microg/m3. In smoke-free public places the average concentration was 0.85 microg/m3; in public places where smoking is allowed concentration was higher (11.53 microg/m3). In the smoking section and non-smoking section of restaurants with separated areas the average concentration was respectively 2.54 and 2.14 microg/m3. The highest nicotine concentrations were recorded in discos and restaurants. A smoke-free public place is effective in reducing ETS exposure. Smoking and non-smoking sections in restaurants without a separate ventilation system seem not to solve ETS exposure.
    Epidemiologia e prevenzione 28(2):94-9. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: "Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) exposure in a sample of European cities" is the first European multicentre project intended to measure ETS exposure in public places in a number of European cities. To present results of measurements of nicotine concentration in a number of bars, restaurants and discotheques in Florence, Italy. The ETS marker was vapour-phase nicotine sampled by passive monitors. At least two monitors were placed in each of seven bars (five in hospitals; one at an airport; one at a railway station), and seven restaurants (three with smoking and non-smoking sections), and left in place for several days. In each of four discotheques two nicotine passive monitors were used as personal samplers. The average nicotine concentration in discotheques, restaurants and bars was respectively 26.78 micro/m3, 2.32 microg/m3 and 0.83 microg/m3. In the smoking section of restaurants with separated areas for smokers and non-smokers the average nicotine concentration was 2.54 microg/m3, which was similar to that measured in non-smoking sections (2.14 microg/m3).
    La Medicina del lavoro 95(1):39-44. · 0.38 Impact Factor