Borna Müller

Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, Province of the Western Cape, South Africa

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Publications (20)77.31 Total impact

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    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 08/2013; in press. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to estimate the global occurrence of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis or M. caprae infections in humans by performing a multilingual, systematic review and analysis of relevant scientific literature of the last 2 decades. Although information from many parts of the world was not available, data from 61 countries suggested a low global disease incidence. In regions outside Africa included in this study, overall median proportions of zoonotic TB of ≤1.4% in connection with overall TB incidence rates ≤71/100,000 population/year suggested low incidence rates. For countries of Africa included in the study, we multiplied the observed median proportion of zoonotic TB cases of 2.8% with the continental average overall TB incidence rate of 264/100,000 population/year, which resulted in a crude estimate of 7 zoonotic TB cases/100,000 population/year. These generally low incidence rates notwithstanding, available data indicated substantial consequences of this disease for some population groups and settings.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 06/2013; 19(6):899-908. · 6.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Factors driving the increase in drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, are not understood. A convenience sample of 309 drug-susceptible and 342 multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB isolates, collected July 2008-July 2009, were characterized by spoligotyping, DNA fingerprinting, insertion site mapping, and targeted DNA sequencing. Analysis of molecular-based data showed diverse genetic backgrounds among drug-sensitive and MDR TB sensu stricto isolates in contrast to restricted genetic backgrounds among pre-extensively drug-resistant (pre-XDR) TB and XDR TB isolates. Second-line drug resistance was significantly associated with the atypical Beijing genotype. DNA fingerprinting and sequencing demonstrated that the pre-XDR and XDR atypical Beijing isolates evolved from a common progenitor; 85% and 92%, respectively, were clustered, indicating transmission. Ninety-three percent of atypical XDR Beijing isolates had mutations that confer resistance to 10 anti-TB drugs, and some isolates also were resistant to para-aminosalicylic acid. These findings suggest the emergence of totally drug-resistant TB.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 03/2013; 19(3):449-55. · 6.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a growing threat to global health. Studies focusing on single antibiotics have shown that drug resistance is often associated with a fitness cost in the absence of drug. However, little is known about the fitness cost associated with resistance to multiple antibiotics. We used Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model for human tuberculosis (TB) and an in vitro competitive fitness assay to explore the combined fitness effects and interaction between mutations conferring resistance to rifampicin (RIF) and ofloxacin (OFX); two of the most important first- and second-line anti-TB drugs, respectively. We found that 4 out of 17 M. smegmatis mutants (24%) resistant to RIF and OFX showed a statistically significantly higher or lower competitive fitness than expected when assuming a multiplicative model of fitness effects of each individual mutation. Moreover, 6 out of the 17 double drug-resistant mutants (35%) had a significantly higher fitness than at least one of the corresponding single drug-resistant mutants. The particular combinations of resistance mutations associated with no fitness deficit in M. smegmatis were the most frequent among 151 clinical isolates of MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis from South Africa. Our results suggest that epistasis between drug resistance mutations in mycobacteria can lead to MDR strains with no fitness deficit, and that these strains are positively selected in settings with a high burden of drug-resistant TB. Taken together, our findings support a role for epistasis in the evolution and epidemiology of MDR- and XDR-TB.
    Evolution, medicine, and public health. 01/2013; 2013(1):65-74.
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    ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most devastating infectious diseases worldwide. Whilst global burden estimates for M. tuberculosis infection (MtTB) are well established, accurate data on the contribution of zoonotic TB (zTB) caused by M. bovis or M. caprae to human TB are scarce. The association of M. bovis infection with extrapulmonary tuberculosis has been suggested repeatedly, though there is little scientific evidence available to support this relationship. The present study aimed to determine globally the occurrence of extrapulmonary TB and the primary site (i.e. primary body location affected) of zTB in comparison with MtTB, based on previously published reports. A systematic literature review was conducted in 32 different bibliographic databases, selecting reports on zTB written in English, French, German, Spanish or Portuguese. Data from 27 reports from Africa, America, Europe and the Western Pacific Region were extracted for analyses. Low income countries, in Africa and South-East Asia, were highly underrepresented in the dataset. The median proportion of extrapulmonary TB cases was significantly increased among zTB in comparison with data from registries of Europe and USA, reporting mainly MtTB cases (47% versus 22% in Europe, 73% versus 30% in the USA). These findings were confirmed by analyses of eight studies reporting on the proportions of extrapulmonary TB in comparable populations of zTB and MtTB cases (median 63% versus 22%). Also, disparities of primary sites of extrapulmonary TB between zTB and MtTB were detected. Our findings, based on global data, confirm the widely suggested association between zTB and extrapulmonary disease. Different disability weights for zTB and MtTB should be considered and we recommend separate burden estimates for the two diseases.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 01/2013; 7(8):e2399. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: South Africa shows one of the highest global burdens of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). Since 2002, MDR-TB in South Africa has been treated by a standardized combination therapy, which until 2010 included ofloxacin, kanamycin, ethionamide, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. Since 2010, ethambutol has been replaced by cycloserine or terizidone. The effect of standardized treatment on the acquisition of XDR-TB is not currently known. We genetically characterized a random sample of 4,667 patient isolates of drug-sensitive, MDR and XDR-TB cases collected from three South African provinces, namely, the Western Cape, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. Drug resistance patterns of a subset of isolates were analyzed for the presence of commonly observed resistance mutations. Our analyses revealed a strong association between distinct strain genotypes and the emergence of XDR-TB in three neighbouring provinces of South Africa. Strains predominant in XDR-TB increased in proportion by more than 20-fold from drug-sensitive to XDR-TB and accounted for up to 95% of the XDR-TB cases. A high degree of clustering for drug resistance mutation patterns was detected. For example, the largest cluster of XDR-TB associated strains in the Eastern Cape, affecting more than 40% of all MDR patients in this province, harboured identical mutations concurrently conferring resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, streptomycin, ethionamide, kanamycin, amikacin and capreomycin. XDR-TB associated genotypes in South Africa probably were programmatically selected as a result of the standard treatment regimen being ineffective in preventing their transmission. Our findings call for an immediate adaptation of standard treatment regimens for M/XDR-TB in South Africa.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e70919. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent surveillance data of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) reported the highest rates of resistance ever documented. As further amplification of resistance in MDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis occurs, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and totally drug-resistant (TDR) TB are beginning to emerge. Although for the most part, the epidemiological factors involved in the spread of MDR-TB are understood, insights into the bacterial drivers of MDR-TB have been gained only recently, largely owing to novel technologies and research in other organisms. Herein, we review recent findings on how bacterial factors, such as persistence, hypermutation, the complex interrelation between drug resistance and fitness, compensatory evolution, and epistasis affect the evolution of multidrug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Improved knowledge of these factors will help better predict the future trajectory of MDR-TB, and contribute to the development of new tools and strategies to combat this growing public health threat.
    Trends in Genetics 12/2012; · 9.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genomes contain 2 large gene families termed pe and ppe. The function of pe/ppe proteins remains enigmatic but studies suggest that they are secreted or cell surface associated and are involved in bacterial virulence. Previous studies have also shown that some pe/ppe genes are polymorphic, a finding that suggests involvement in antigenic variation. Using comparative sequence analysis of 18 publicly available MTBC whole genome sequences, we have performed alignments of 33 pe (excluding pe_pgrs) and 66 ppe genes in order to detect the frequency and nature of genetic variation. This work has been supplemented by whole gene sequencing of 14 pe/ppe (including 5 pe_pgrs) genes in a cohort of 40 diverse and well defined clinical isolates covering all the main lineages of the M. tuberculosis phylogenetic tree. We show that nsSNP's in pe (excluding pgrs) and ppe genes are 3.0 and 3.3 times higher than in non-pe/ppe genes respectively and that numerous other mutation types are also present at a high frequency. It has previously been shown that non-pe/ppe M. tuberculosis genes display a remarkably low level of purifying selection. Here, we also show that compared to these genes those of the pe/ppe families show a further reduction of selection pressure that suggests neutral evolution. This is inconsistent with the positive selection pressure of "classical" antigenic variation. Finally, by analyzing such a large number of genes we were able to detect large differences in mutation type and frequency between both individual genes and gene sub-families. The high variation rates and absence of selective constraints provides valuable insights into potential pe/ppe function. Since pe/ppe proteins are highly antigenic and have been studied as potential vaccine components these results should also prove informative for aspects of M. tuberculosis vaccine design.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(4):e30593. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genotyping of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from tuberculosis (TB) patients in four South African provinces (Western Cape, Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, and Gauteng) revealed a distinct population structure of the MDR strains in all four regions, despite the evidence of substantial human migration between these settings. In all analyzed provinces, a negative correlation between strain diversity and an increasing level of drug resistance (from MDR-TB to extensively drug-resistant TB [XDR-TB]) was observed. Strains predominating in XDR-TB in the Western and Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces were strongly associated with harboring an inhA promoter mutation, potentially suggesting a role of these mutations in XDR-TB development in South Africa. Approximately 50% of XDR-TB cases detected in the Western Cape were due to strains probably originating from the Eastern Cape. This situation may illustrate how failure of efficient health care delivery in one setting can burden health clinics in other areas.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 12/2011; 50(3):995-1002. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) has reached alarming proportions in South Africa, draining valuable resources that are needed to fight drug susceptible TB. It is currently estimated that 9.6% of all TB cases have multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB, thereby ranking South Africa as one of the highest MDR-TB burden countries in the world. Molecular epidemiological studies have demonstrated the complexity of the epidemic and have clearly shown that the epidemic is driven by transmission as a consequence of low cases detection and diagnostic delay. The latter has in turn fueled the amplification of drug resistance, ultimately leading to the emergence of extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. Despite the introduction of new drugs to combat this scourge, culture conversion rates for XDR-TB remain below 20%. Failure to achieve cure may be explained from DNA sequencing results which have demonstrated mutations in 7 genes encoding resistance to at least 8 anti-TB drugs. This review shows how molecular epidemiology has provided novel insights into the MDR-TB epidemic in South Africa and thereby has highlighted the challenges that need to be addressed regarding the diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB. An important step towards for curbing this epidemic will be collaboration between clinicians, laboratories and researchers to establish scientific knowledge and medical expertise to more efficiently guide public health policy.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 08/2011; 12(4):686-94. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have identified a globally important clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis by deletion analysis of over one thousand strains from over 30 countries. We initially show that over 99% of the strains of M. bovis, the cause of bovine tuberculosis, isolated from cattle in the Republic of Ireland and the UK are closely related and are members of a single clonal complex marked by the deletion of chromosomal region RDEu1 and we named this clonal complex European 1 (Eu1). Eu1 strains were present at less than 14% of French, Portuguese and Spanish isolates of M. bovis but are rare in other mainland European countries and Iran. However, strains of the Eu1 clonal complex were found at high frequency in former trading partners of the UK (USA, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and Canada). The Americas, with the exception of Brazil, are dominated by the Eu1 clonal complex which was at high frequency in Argentina, Chile, Ecuador and Mexico as well as North America. Eu1 was rare or absent in the African countries surveyed except South Africa. A small sample of strains from Taiwan were non-Eu1 but, surprisingly, isolates from Korea and Kazakhstan were members of the Eu1 clonal complex. The simplest explanation for much of the current distribution of the Eu1 clonal complex is that it was spread in infected cattle, such as Herefords, from the UK to former trading partners, although there is evidence of secondary dispersion since. This is the first identification of a globally dispersed clonal complex M. bovis and indicates that much of the current global distribution of this important veterinary pathogen has resulted from relatively recent International trade in cattle.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 05/2011; 11(6):1340-51. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    Infection Genetics and Evolution 05/2011; · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies.
    Journal of bacteriology 02/2011; 193(3):670-8. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Routine meat inspection of antelope carcasses from a South African game reserve revealed a high prevalence of tuberculosis-like lesions. This study aimed to identify the causative agent of this disease and to describe its pathological features. In total, 139 antelopes were randomly harvested from the game reserve and subjected to meat inspection. Of these animals, 46 (33%) showed gross visible, tuberculosis-like lesions. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of encapsulated necrogranulomas in organs and/or lymph nodes of 22 of 27 animals tested. Tissue samples from lesions were processed for both non-selective bacterial culture and mycobacterial culture following decontamination. In non-selective cultures of lesions from 25 of 31 animals tested, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was detected. Isolation of C. pseudotuberculosis was closely associated with the presence of necrogranulomas. In mycobacterial cultures of lesions from 9 of 41 animals tested, different species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) were detected. In 5 instances, depending on the culture procedure that was applied, either C. pseudotuberculosis or NTMs were isolated from the same tissue sample. Our results suggest that the disease has been caused by infections with C. pseudotuberculosis. In sub-Saharan Africa, the role of pathogens other than Mycobacterium bovis may be underestimated in causing tuberculosis-like lesions. In cases where potentially pathogenic NTMs are isolated from mycobacterial cultures of tuberculosis-like lesions, the non-use of additional non-selective culture techniques could lead to misinterpretations of the diagnostic test results.
    Veterinary Microbiology 01/2011; 147(3-4):340-5. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mycobacterium bovis is a pathogen of significant importance in livestock and a wide range of wild animal species worldwide. It is also known to cause tuberculosis disease in humans, a fact which has raised renewed concerns regarding the zoonotic risk for humans, especially those living at the animal-human interface. This review consolidates recent reports in the literature mainly on animal and zoonotic tuberculosis with an emphasis on evolution, epidemiology, treatment and diagnosis. The information presented reveals the fundamental differences in the complexity and level at which the disease affects the economy, ecosystem and human population of regions where animal tuberculosis control is achieved and regions where little or no control is implemented. In conclusion the review suggests that bovine tuberculosis has essentially been reduced to a disease of economic importance in the developed world, while low-income countries are facing a multifaceted impact which potentially affects the health of livestock, humans and ecosystems and which is likely to increase in the presence of debilitating diseases such as HIV/AIDS and other factors which negatively affect human livelihoods.
    Veterinary Microbiology 09/2009; 140(3-4):371-81. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effective surveillance of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in developing countries where reliable data on disease prevalence is scarce or absent is a precondition for considering potential control options. We conducted a slaughterhouse survey to assess for the first time the burden of BTB in Southern Chad. Altogether, 954 slaughter animals were consecutively sampled and tested using the single intra-dermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test, a recently developed fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and routine abattoir meat inspection after slaughter. Gross visible lesions were detected in 11.3% (CI: 9.4-13.5%) of the animals examined and they were mostly located in the lymph nodes and the lung. Significantly more Mbororo zebus (15.0%) were affected by lesions than Arab zebus (9.9%; OR=2.20, CI: 1.41-3.41%; p<0.001). Of all animals tested, 7.7% (CI: 6.2-9.6%) reacted positively to SICCT if OIE guidelines were applied. However, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infected animals as the positive population and lesion negative animals as the negative population, revealed a better SICCT performance if the cut-off value was decreased to >2mm. SICCT reactor prevalence rose to 15.5% (CI: 13.3-18.0%) and FPA did not perform better than SICCT, when this setting adapted cut-off was applied.
    Preventive Veterinary Medicine 05/2009; 89(1-2):81-9. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle in population samples from several sub-Saharan west-central African countries. This closely related group of bacteria is defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf1) and can be identified by the absence of spacer 30 in the standard spoligotype typing scheme. We have named this group of strains the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex and have defined the spoligotype signature of this clonal complex as being the same as the M. bovis BCG vaccine strain but with the deletion of spacer 30. Strains of the Af1 clonal complex were found at high frequency in population samples of M. bovis from cattle in Mali, Cameroon, Nigeria, and Chad, and using a combination of variable-number tandem repeat typing and spoligotyping, we show that the population of M. bovis in each of these countries is distinct, suggesting that the recent mixing of strains between countries is not common in this area of Africa. Strains with the Af1-specific deletion (RDAf1) were not identified in M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Furthermore, the spoligotype signature of the Af1 clonal complex has not been identified in population samples of bovine tuberculosis from Europe, Iran, and South America. These observations suggest that the Af1 clonal complex is geographically localized, albeit to several African countries, and we suggest that the dominance of the clonal complex in this region is the result of an original introduction into cows naïve to bovine tuberculosis.
    Journal of bacteriology 02/2009; 191(6):1951-60. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine Tuberculosis is prevalent in Algeria despite governmental attempts to control the disease. The objective of this study was to conduct, for the first time, molecular characterization of a population sample of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from slaughter cattle in Algeria. Between August and November 2007, 7250 animals were consecutively screened at the abattoirs of Algiers and Blida. In 260 animals, gross visible granulomatous lesions were detected and put into culture. Bacterial isolates were subsequently analysed by molecular methods. Altogether, 101 bacterial strains from 100 animals were subjected to molecular characterization. M. bovis was isolated from 88 animals. Other bacteria isolated included one strain of M. caprae, four Rhodococcus equi strains, three Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and five strains of other bacterial species. The M. bovis strains isolated showed 22 different spoligotype patterns; four of them had not been previously reported. The majority of M. bovis strains (89%) showed spoligotype patterns that were previously observed in strains from European cattle. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing supported a link between M. bovis strains from Algeria and France. One spoligotype pattern has also been shown to be frequent in M. bovis strains from Mali although the VNTR pattern of the Algerian strains differed from the Malian strains. M. bovis infections account for a high amount of granulomatous lesions detected in Algerian slaughter cattle during standard meat inspection at Algiers and Blida abattoir. Molecular typing results suggested a link between Algerian and European strains of M. bovis.
    BMC Veterinary Research 02/2009; 5:4. · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) today primarily affects developing countries. In Africa, the disease is present essentially on the whole continent; however, little accurate information on its distribution and prevalence is available. Also, attempts to evaluate diagnostic tests for BTB in naturally infected cattle are scarce and mostly complicated by the absence of knowledge of the true disease status of the tested animals. However, diagnostic test evaluation in a given setting is a prerequisite for the implementation of local surveillance schemes and control measures. We subjected a slaughterhouse population of 954 Chadian cattle to single intra-dermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) testing and two recently developed fluorescence polarization assays (FPA). Using a Bayesian modeling approach we computed the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of each diagnostic test, the true disease prevalence in the sampled population and the disease status of all sampled animals in the absence of knowledge of the true disease status of the sampled animals. In our Chadian setting, SICCT performed better if the cut-off for positive test interpretation was lowered from >4 mm (OIE standard cut-off) to >2 mm. Using this cut-off, SICCT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 66% and 89%, respectively. Both FPA tests showed sensitivities below 50% but specificities above 90%. The true disease prevalence was estimated at 8%. Altogether, 11% of the sampled animals showed gross visible tuberculous lesions. However, modeling of the BTB disease status of the sampled animals indicated that 72% of the suspected tuberculosis lesions detected during standard meat inspections were due to other pathogens than Mycobacterium bovis. Our results have important implications for BTB diagnosis in a high incidence sub-Saharan African setting and demonstrate the practicability of our Bayesian approach for diagnostic test evaluation.
    PLoS ONE 01/2009; 4(12):e8215. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mali is one of the most important livestock producers of the Sahel region of Africa. A high frequency of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) has been reported but surveillance and control schemes are restricted to abattoir inspections only. The objective of this study was to conduct, for the first time, molecular characterisation of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from cattle slaughtered at the Bamako abattoir. Of 3330 animals screened only 60 exhibited gross visible lesions. From these animals, twenty strains of M. bovis were isolated and characterised by spoligotyping. Organ lesions typical of BTB were most often detected in the liver, followed by the lung and the peritoneum. M. bovis was isolated from 20 animals and 7 different spoligotypes were observed among these 20 strains; three of the patterns had not been previously reported. Spoligotype patterns from thirteen of the strains lacked spacer 30, a characteristic common in strains of M. bovis found in Chad, Cameroon and Nigeria. However, unlike the other three Central African countries, the majority of spoligotype patterns observed in Mali also lacked spacer 6. Of the remaining seven strains, six had spoligotype patterns identical to strains commonly isolated in France and Spain. Two groups of M. bovis were detected in cattle slaughtered at the Bamako abattoir. The spoligotype pattern of the first group has similarities to strains previously observed in Chad, Cameroon and Nigeria. The additional absence of spacer 6 in the majority of these strains suggests a Mali specific clone. The spoligotype patterns of the remaining strains suggest that they may have been of European origin.
    BMC Veterinary Research 01/2008; 4:26. · 1.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

256 Citations
77.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2013
    • Stellenbosch University
      • Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics
      Stellenbosch, Province of the Western Cape, South Africa
    • The Aurum Institute
      Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa
  • 2008–2012
    • Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
      • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2009
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • Saad Dahlab University
      • Department of Veterinary
      Blida, Wilaya de Blida, Algeria