Antònia Domingo-Salvany

IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (102)289.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To examine changes in the use of alcohol, cannabis and hypnotics/sedatives between two periods (before and during Spain's economic crisis), and to identify differences in the change between employed and unemployed individuals. Using cross-sectional data from four editions of the Spanish Household Survey on Alcohol and Drugs we selected economically active individuals aged 16-64 years (total sample = 62,440) and defined two periods, pre-crisis (P1 = 2005-2007) and crisis (P2 = 2009-2011). Poisson regression models with robust variance were fitted to obtain prevalence ratios (PR) of heavy and binge drinking, and multinomial regression models to obtain relative risk ratios (RRR) of cannabis and hypnotic/sedative use, between the two periods, also considering the interaction between period and employment status. While the prevalence of alcohol use remained stable, heavy drinking declined in P2 in men both overall (PR = 0.73; 95%CI:0.67-0.79) and in the two age groups (16-34 and 35-64), and in women also overall (PR = 0.86; 95%CI:0.75-0.99) and in the older age group. In contrast, binge drinking increased overall in P2 in men (PR = 1.17; 95%CI:1.12-1.22) and in women (PR = 1.62; 95%CI:1.49-1.76), and in both age groups. No differences in the change were observed between employed and unemployed individuals. Overall cannabis use remained stable in P2, but unemployed men and women of the older age group were more likely to have increased sporadic use compared to their employed counterparts (RRR = 2.24; 95%CI:1.36-3.68 and RRR = 3.21; 95%CI:1.30-7.93, respectively). Hypnotic/sedative use remained stable in P2 in men, but unemployed men were less likely to have increased heavy use in P2 compared with employed men (RRR = 0.69; 95%CI:0.49-0.97). In women, heavy use increased in P2 overall and in the older age group, irrespective of employment status. In a period of economic recession in Spain heavy drinking decreased and binge drinking increased. Sporadic cannabis use increased among older unemployed men and women. Heavy use of hypnotics/sedatives increased among employed men while older women increased use irrespective of employment status. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Addiction 03/2015; DOI:10.1111/add.12923 · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Drug addiction and psychiatric disorders are frequently concomitant; however, few studies have investigated the impact of psychiatric disorders other than substance use disorder (SUD) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in drug users not in treatment. We studied the association of psychiatric disorders other than SUD with HRQoL in a street-recruited sample of cocaine and/or heroin users. It is a cross-sectional study involving 287 young users of cocaine and/or heroin in Barcelona, Spain. HRQoL was assessed with the Nottingham health profile (NHP). Patterns of drug use and mental disorders were assessed using the Spanish version of the psychiatric research interview for substance and mental disorders IV, and degree of dependence through the severity of dependence scale (SDS). The association of mental disorders with HRQoL was assessed through a Tobit regression analysis. The overall NHP score was 23.9 (SD = 20.5, range 0-91.7). Sixty-one percent of the sample had two or more SUDs; 22 % had at least one non-SUD Axis I disorder (anxiety, mood, psychotic, or eating disorder); and 27.2 % had a borderline personality disorder (BPD) and/or antisocial personality disorder. Variables negatively associated with the global NHP score were psychosis [transformed beta coefficient: 15.23; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 4.48-25.97], BPD (9.55; 95 % CI 2.95-16.15), severity of dependence (8.12; 95 % CI 3.37-12.87), having two or more SUDs (for two or three SUDs: 6.83; 95 % CI 2.08-11.59) (>3 SUDs: 7.70; 95 % CI 1.72-13.68) and the intravenous use of some substance (10.20; 95 % CI 6.00-14.40). HRQoL among street-recruited illegal substance users was impaired, particularly among those with psychiatric comorbidity, psychosis, and BPD being especially relevant.
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    ABSTRACT: The use of opiates, particularly heroin, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Half of the deaths among heroin consumers are attributed to overdose. In response to this problem, overdose prevention programs (OPPs) were designed. The objective of our study was to assess coverage of OPPs among the target population in a specific Spanish region (Catalonia) and to identify characteristics related to attendance. A cross-sectional survey recruited individuals from outpatient treatment centers (OTCs), therapeutic communities (ThCs), and harm reduction facilities (HRFs) in Catalonia. From 513 participants, 306 opiate users and/or injectors were selected for this study. Coverage was calculated as the proportion of subjects who declared having participated in an OPP. A Poisson regression with robust variance was used to assess factors (socio-demographic aspects and psychoactive substance use patterns) associated to OPP participation, taking into account recruitment strategy. Average age of the 306 subjects was 39.7 years (s.d.: 7.7); 79% were male; 79.2% lived in urban areas and 56.3% were unemployed or had never worked. Overall OPP coverage was 43.5% (95% CI: 37%-49%). Training was received mostly in HRF (60%), followed by OTC (24.4%), prison (19%), and ThC (16%). OPP sessions were attended by 41% of Spanish-born study participants and by 63.3% of foreigners; 92.2% of the participants lived in urban areas. The Poisson regression analysis adjusted by age, sex, and type of recruitment center showed that OPP participation rates were higher for individuals with foreign nationality (PR =1.3; 95% CI: 1.04-1.72), for those living in municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants (PR =2.0; 95% CI: 1.37-2.81) or the Barcelona conurbation (PR =2.5; 95% CI: 1.68-3.77), and for those having ever been in prison (PR =1.6; 95% CI: 1.41-1.81) and had first consumption when they were less than 12 years old (PR =1.2; 95% CI: 1.06-1.45). Coverage as a whole can be considered high. However, in Catalonia, new strategies ought to be developed in order to attract opiate users and injectors not currently participating, by expanding OPP offer to services and regions where coverage is poor.
    Harm Reduction Journal 11/2014; 11(1):33. DOI:10.1186/1477-7517-11-33 · 1.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To explore the prevalence of the use of hypnotics and sedatives in a sample of the Spanish working population and to examine its association with certain work-related stress factors. Methods Using data from the 2007 Spanish Household Survey on Alcohol and Drugs (Encuesta Domiciliaria sobre Alcohol y Drogas en España [EDADES]), we analyzed the distribution of the use of hypnotics and sedatives in the previous month in the working population aged 16 to 64 years old (n = 13,005). Associations with exposure to certain work-related stress factors (noxious working environment, precariousness, workload, and social support) were examined using logistic regression modelling. Results The prevalence of the use of hypnotics and sedatives among women in the previous month doubled that of men (6.5% and 3.3%, respectively), while use among the oldest age group was twice that of the youngest group in both sexes (10.2% in women and 5.5% in men older than 45 years), and was four times higher among those reporting poor health (18.9% in women and 11% in men). Concerning work-related stress, exposure to moderate (OR: 1.96; 95%CI: 1.31-2.92) and high (OR: 1.95; 95%CI: 1.14-3.34) levels of precariousness in men and moderate levels in women (OR: 1.43; 95%CI: 1.03-1.99) was associated with the use of hypnotics and sedatives. Conclusions The prevalence of the use of hypnotics and sedatives was high in women and in workers older than 45 years. Further research is needed on the relationship between the use of hypnotics and sedatives and workers’ health, and on the role that work-related stress factors play in this association.
    Gaceta Sanitaria 09/2014; 28(5). DOI:10.1016/j.gaceta.2014.04.009 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the prevalence of the use of hypnotics and sedatives in a sample of the Spanish working population and to examine its association with certain work-related stress factors.
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the profile of community-recruited regular cocaine users and the prevalence of recent depression and associated factors. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 630 regular cocaine users who were not heroin consumers. Depression, social support and dependence were evaluated with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the Duke-Functional Social Support Questionnaire, and the Severity of Dependence Scale, respectively. The mean age was 23 years and 33% of users were women. The predominant profile of cocaine use was recreational-intense. Most (88%) participants had completed secondary education. The use of emergency services in the previous year was 45.9% and 7.8% were under drug-dependence/psychiatric treatment. The prevalence of depression was 14.6%. In the multivariate analysis, the factors associated with recent depression were female gender, homelessness, ketamine consumption, and less confidential support CONCLUSIONS: Regular cocaine users may require specific attention in general health services. Greater access to treatment for depression is needed among this group.
    Gaceta Sanitaria 12/2013; 28(2). DOI:10.1016/j.gaceta.2013.09.001 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a brief tool, the Dual Diagnosis Screening Instrument (DDSI), to screen psychiatric disorders in substance users in treatment and nontreatment-seeking samples. Methods: A total of 827 substance users (66.5% male, mean age 28.6 ± 9.9 years) recruited in treatment (in- and outpatient) and nontreatment (substance user volunteers in university research studies) settings were assessed by trained interviewers using the DDSI and the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM) as the criterion standard. Both instruments were administered blind to the results of the other. Disorders obtained with the DDSI were compared to lifetime diagnoses obtained with the PRISM. Sensitivity, specificity, negative, and positive predictive values were estimated. Also test-retest reliability of the DDSI was assessed. Results: The DDSI showed a high sensitivity (≥80%) for identifying lifetime depression, mania, psychosis, panic, social phobia, and specific phobia disorders. Specificity was ≥82% for those diagnoses. Test-retest κ showed excellent agreement (range 81-95%). The mean duration of the DDSI administration was 16.8 ± 2.5 min. Conclusion: The DDSI is a valid and easy-to-administer screening tool to detect possible psychiatric comorbidity among substance users.
    European Addiction Research 08/2013; 20(1):41-48. DOI:10.1159/000351519 · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Aims: Non-fatal opioid overdose (NFOO) and major depression (MD) are highly prevalent in heroin users. Many risk factors are known for NFOO, but studies in non-clinical samples on its relationship with MD are lacking. We aimed to examine this relationship in a street-recruited sample, controlling for potential well-known confounders. Methods: A cross-sectional study in 452 heroin users street-recruited by chain referral methods in three Spanish cities. Eligibility criteria were: age ≤30 years, heroin use at least 12 days in the last year and at least once in the last 3 months. Depression was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. A precise definition of NFOO was used. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for the NFOO predictors were obtained by logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of NFOO and MD in the last 12 months was 9.1 and 23.2%, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, NFOO and MD were significantly associated (AOR 2.2; 95% CI 1.01-4.74). Other associated factors were imprisonment (AOR 4.1; 95% CI 1.4-12.1), drug injection (AOR 6.7; 95% CI 2.4-18.4) and regular use of tranquillisers/sleeping pills (AOR 2.9; 95% CI 1.16-7). Conclusions: Drug and mental health treatment facilities should consider the relationship between MD and NFOO when contacting and treating heroin users. Imprisonment, drug injection and use of tranquillisers/sleeping pills are also risk factors for NFOO.
    European Addiction Research 08/2013; 20(1):1-7. DOI:10.1159/000346787 · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify and validate a factor structure from items on working conditions included in the 2007 edition of Spanish Household Survey on Alcohol and Drugs (EDADES-2007) for use in research on consumption of addictive substances with this survey. We performed a factor analysis of the questionnaire items using a cross-validation technique with a subsample of EDADES 2007 (N=13,005). Exploratory factor analysis with half of this sample yielded a latent factor structure. This structure was subsequently validated via confirmatory factor analysis with the remaining half of the sample. Standard criteria were used to test the model's goodness of fit, and a model-based internal consistency index was used to test the reliability of the structure. The structure obtained showed an adequate confirmatory fit and involved four factors related to the dimensions environmental conditions (F1), workload (F2), precariousness (F3) and social support (F4). The internal consistency index confirmed the reliability for the total structure (0.755) as well as for each of the factors (F1=0.755, F2=0.661, F3=0.529 and F4=0.680). The structure obtained represents a valid tool for assessing the relationship between use of addictive substances and certain work and employment conditions in the context of the EDADES survey. However, the inclusion of a more comprehensive and validated tool for the measurement of these conditions should be considered in future editions of the survey.
    07/2013; 16(3):130-135. DOI:10.12961/aprl.2012.16.3.03
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    ABSTRACT: In Spain, the new National Classification of Occupations (Clasificación Nacional de Ocupaciones [CNO-2011]) is substantially different to the 1994 edition, and requires adaptation of occupational social classes for use in studies of health inequalities. This article presents two proposals to measure social class: the new classification of occupational social class (CSO-SEE12), based on the CNO-2011 and a neo-Weberian perspective, and a social class classification based on a neo-Marxist approach. The CSO-SEE12 is the result of a detailed review of the CNO-2011 codes. In contrast, the neo-Marxist classification is derived from variables related to capital and organizational and skill assets. The proposed CSO-SEE12 consists of seven classes that can be grouped into a smaller number of categories according to study needs. The neo-Marxist classification consists of 12 categories in which home owners are divided into three categories based on capital goods and employed persons are grouped into nine categories composed of organizational and skill assets. These proposals are complemented by a proposed classification of educational level that integrates the various curricula in Spain and provides correspondences with the International Standard Classification of Education.
    Gaceta Sanitaria 05/2013; 27(3):263–272. DOI:10.1016/j.gaceta.2012.12.009 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIM: This study estimates lifetime incidence trends of cannabis and cocaine use over 38 years from general population surveys of drug use (GPSDU) in Spain, taking into account changes of population age structure. DESIGN: Periodic cross-sectional studies. SETTING: Eight biennial GPSDU from 1995 to 2009 in Spain. PARTICIPANTS: Interviewees aged 15-64 who reported age of first ever cannabis and/or cocaine use between 10 and 64 years between 1971 and 2008. MEASUREMENTS: Estimates of raw and standardized incidences were calculated as a weighted mean of the incidences from all surveys. Standardization was done to take into account changes of population age structure. Incidence trends were extracted applying weighted cubic smoothing splines to incidence estimates. FINDINGS: For both substances, estimated raw incidence trends increased up until the year 2000 (rates of 11.5±0.7 and 3.6±0.5 per 1,000, respectively for cannabis and cocaine), and then decreased significantly (in 2008, 9.6±1.2 and 2.7±0.6, respectively). In contrast, standardized rates exhibit a steadily increasing trend up to 2000 (9.0±0.6 and 2.8±0.4), followed by a statistically non-significant increasing trend afterwards (in 2008, 9.5±1.2 and 2.8±0.6). The largest increases of incidence were observed in subjects 15 to 19 years old, both males and females. CONCLUSIONS: Using data from Spanish general population surveys of drug use, an apparently decreasing trend of raw incidence rates in both cannabis and cocaine use from 2000 became non-decreasing trends when these rates were standardized. First experiences of cannabis and cocaine use in Spain mainly occur in younger ages (15-19 years).
    Addiction 02/2013; 108(8). DOI:10.1111/add.12170 · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Spain, the new National Classification of Occupations (Clasificación Nacional de Ocupaciones [CNO-2011]) is substantially different to the 1994 edition, and requires adaptation of occupational social classes for use in studies of health inequalities. This article presents two proposals to measure social class: the new classification of occupational social class (CSO-SEE12), based on the CNO-2011 and a neo-Weberian perspective, and a social class classification based on a neo-Marxist approach. The CSO-SEE12 is the result of a detailed review of the CNO-2011 codes. In contrast, the neo-Marxist classification is derived from variables related to capital and organizational and skill assets. The proposed CSO-SEE12 consists of seven classes that can be grouped into a smaller number of categories according to study needs. The neo-Marxist classification consists of 12 categories in which home owners are divided into three categories based on capital goods and employed persons are grouped into nine categories composed of organizational and skill assets. These proposals are complemented by a proposed classification of educational level that integrates the various curricula in Spain and provides correspondences with the International Standard Classification of Education.
    Gaceta Sanitaria 02/2013; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    Marta Torrens, Francina Fonseca, Claudio Castillo, Antonia Domingo-Salvany
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    ABSTRACT: During the 1980s, Spain had very strict laws limiting access to opioid agonist maintenance treatment (OAMT). Because of this, mortality among people who used illicit opioids and other illicit drugs was high. Spain was also the European country with the highest number of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome transmitted through illicit drug injection. The rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among people using heroin led to a shift from a drug-free approach to the treatment of opioid dependence to one focused on harm reduction. A substantial change in legislation made it possible to meet public health needs and offer OAMT as part of harm reduction programmes in the public health system, including prisons. Legislative changes were made throughout the country, although at a different pace in different regions. Legal changes facilitated the expansion of OAMT, which has achieved a coverage of 60%. A parallel reduction in the annual incidence of HIV infection has been reported. Reductions in morbidity and mortality and improved health-related quality of life have been described in patients undergoing OAMT. The treatment of opioid dependence has been more heavily influenced by moral concepts and prejudices that hinder legislation and interfere with the implementation of OAMT than by scientific evidence. To fulfil public health needs, OAMT should be integrated in harm reduction programmes offered primarily in public facilities, including prisons. Longitudinal studies are needed to detect unmet needs and evaluate programme impact and suitability.
    Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 02/2013; 91(2):136-41. DOI:10.2471/BLT.12.111054 · 5.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Existing incidence estimates of heroin use are usually based on one information source. This study aims to incorporate more sources to estimate heroin use incidence trends in Spain between 1971 and 2005. Methods A multi-state model was constructed, whereby the initial state “heroin consumer” is followed by transition to either “admitted to first treatment” or to “left heroin use” (i.e. permanent cessation or death). Heroin use incidence and probabilities of entering first treatment ever were estimated following a back-calculation approach. Results The highest heroin use incidence rates in Spain, around 1.5 per 1,000 inhabitants aged 10–44, occurred between 1985 and 1990; subdividing by route of administration reveals higher incidences of injection between 1980 and 1985 (a mean of 0.62 per 1.000) and a peak for non-injectors in 1990 (0.867 per 1,000). Conclusions A simple conceptual model for heroin users’ trajectories related to treatment admission, provided a broader view of the historical trend of heroin use incidence in Spain.
    BMC Medical Research Methodology 01/2013; 13(1):4. DOI:10.1186/1471-2288-13-4 · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This cross-sectional study aims to determine lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders (including substance use disorders, -SUD and other non substance use disorders, –Non-SUD) among 289 young (18- 30 years) regular cannabis users, during the last year, in non-clinical settings in Barcelona. The Spanish version of the Psychiatric Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM) was administered. Only 28% of the participants did not present any psychiatric disorder; while 65% had some SUD, the most common related to cannabis use (62%). Nearly 27% presented a non-SUD disorder. A younger age of initiation on alcohol use was associated with the presence of some SUD. Having consumed a greater number of “joints” in the last month was associated with the presence of both psychiatric disorders (SUD and non-SUD). While three quarters of subjects with non-SUD disorders had received some kind of treatment, only 28% of those with any SUD had received treatment. Given the low perception for need of treatment, there is a need for prevention strategies and to be able to offer therapies specifically tailored targeting young cannabis users.
    Adicciones 01/2013; 25(1):45-53. · 1.17 Impact Factor
  • Adicciones 01/2013; 25(1):87-8. · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To identify the profile of community-recruited regular cocaine users and the prevalence of recent depression and associated factors. Method A cross-sectional study was carried out in 630 regular cocaine users who were not heroin consumers. Depression, social support and dependence were evaluated with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the Duke-Functional Social Support Questionnaire, and the Severity of Dependence Scale, respectively. Results The mean age was 23 years and 33% of users were women. The predominant profile of cocaine use was recreational-intense. Most (88%) participants had completed secondary education. The use of emergency services in the previous year was 45.9% and 7.8% were under drug-dependence/psychiatric treatment. The prevalence of depression was 14.6%. In the multivariate analysis, the factors associated with recent depression were female gender, homelessness, ketamine consumption, and less confidential support Conclusions Regular cocaine users may require specific attention in general health services. Greater access to treatment for depression is needed among this group
    Gaceta Sanitaria 01/2013; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of problem cannabis use screening instruments administration within wide school surveys, their psychometric properties, overlaps, and relationships with other variables. Students from 7 Spanish regions, aged 14–18, who attended secondary schools were sampled by two-stage cluster sampling (net sample 14,589). Standardized, anonymous questionnaire including DSM-IV cannabis abuse criteria, Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST), and Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) was self-completed with paper and pencil in the selected classrooms. Data was analysed using classical psychometric theory, bivariate tests, and multinomial logistic regression analysis. Not responding to instruments’ items (10.5–12.3%) was associated with reporting less frequent cannabis use. The instruments overlapped partially, with 16.1% of positives being positive on all three. SDS was more likely to identify younger users with lower frequency of use who thought habitual cannabis use posed a considerable problem. CAST positivity was associated with frequent cannabis use and related problems. It is feasible to use short psychometric scales in wide school surveys, but one must carefully choose the screening instrument, as different instruments identify different groups of users. These may correspond to different types of problematic cannabis use; however, measurement bias seems to play a role too.
    12/2012; 2013. DOI:10.1155/2013/723131
  • Elisa Chilet-Rosell, Carlos Álvarez-Dardet, Antònia Domingo-Salvany
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Recognizing the need for a consensus tool to measure social class in health sciences, in 1995 the Spanish Society of Epidemiology (Sociedad Española de Epidemiología [SEE]) made a proposal for such a measure. The aim of this article was to explore the bibliometric impact of the SEE's proposal.Methods Articles citing the SEE's report and those citing articles published as a result of the report were identified using Google Scholar and Scopus. The information extracted from these articles consisted of year, nationality and impact factor of the journal, self-citation, information source, subject area, city of the first author, type of publication, study design, use of social class as a variable, number of social class categories, and the use of education or occupation to determine social class.ResultsThe number of citations progressively increased. Citations also showed heterogeneity in the subject. Generally, citations were found in original articles and articles with a cross sectional design, were published in journals with impact factor and were by researchers working in Barcelona or Madrid.Conclusions The SEE's proposal has proved to be an increasingly useful tool, applicable in different contexts. As suggested by the SEE, this proposal may need to be updated.
    Gaceta Sanitaria 12/2012; 26(6):566–569. DOI:10.1016/j.gaceta.2011.10.014 · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Esther Colell, Albert Sánchez-Niubò, Antònia Domingo-Salvany
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Men present higher overall rates of substance use and abuse than women; yet, evidence suggests that an increase of substance use by the younger cohorts of women in recent decades is narrowing this gap in western societies. Moreover, younger cohorts may also be reporting earlier initiation of substance use, representing an increased risk for developing substance-related problems. With this study we intend to identify changes in the patterns of substance use of men and women in Spain for public health policy, planning and intervention. METHODS: Sex differences in the cumulative incidence of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and cocaine were examined by birth cohort using a combined sample of individuals aged 15-64 years from eight editions of the Spanish National Survey on Drugs (1995-2009). RESULTS: Initiation of substance use in Spain is progressively taking place at younger ages, particularly among women. The gender-gap of life-time occurrence of substance use is narrowing (cannabis and cocaine) almost closing (alcohol) and even reversing (tobacco) in the youngest cohort. CONCLUSION: These results reflect the particular evolution and trends of Spanish society regarding substance use. Women's increased use of substances and the earlier age of initiation of substance use by both sexes present particular challenges for prevention and treatment of future substance-related problems. The trends registered for legal and illegal substances would require re-evaluation of existing prevention policies.
    The International journal on drug policy 11/2012; 24(4). DOI:10.1016/j.drugpo.2012.09.006 · 2.54 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
289.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2015
    • IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute
      • Drug Abuse Epidemiology Group
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1999–2013
    • Parc de Salut Mar
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
    • Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1998–2013
    • Institut Marqués, Spain, Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Barcelona Media
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2009–2012
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos III
      • Center National of Epidemiology (CNE)
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2008–2012
    • Parc de recerca biomedica de barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2011
    • IIB Sant Pau
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1995–2008
    • Autonomous University of Barcelona
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2001
    • Universitat de Girona
      • Department of Psychology
      Girona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2000
    • University of Alicante
      Alicante, Valencia, Spain
  • 1996
    • University of Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain