Robert Visse

Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, Gif-sur-Yvette, Ile-de-France, France

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Publications (28)117.47 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Remodeling of collagen by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is crucial to tissue homeostasis and repair. MMP-13 is a collagenase with a substrate preference for collagen II over collagens I and III. It recognizes a specific, well-known site in the tropocollagen molecule where its binding locally perturbs the triple helix, allowing the catalytic domain of the active enzyme to cleave the collagen α chains sequentially, at Gly775-Leu776 in collagen II. However, the specific residues upon which collagen recognition depends within and surrounding this locus have not been systematically mapped. Using our triple-helical peptide Collagen Toolkit libraries in solid-phase binding assays, we found that MMP-13 shows little affinity for Collagen Toolkit III, but binds selectively to two triple-helical peptides of Toolkit II. We have identified the residues required for the adhesion of both proMMP-13 and MMP-13 to one of these, Toolkit peptide II-44, which contains the canonical collagenase cleavage site (at helix residues 775-6). MMP-13 was unable to bind to a linear peptide of the same sequence as II-44. We also discovered a second binding site near the N-terminus of collagen II (starting at helix residue 127) in Toolkit peptide II-8. The pattern of binding of the free hemopexin domain of MMP-13 was similar to that of the full-length enzyme, but the free catalytic subunit bound none of our peptides. The susceptibility of Toolkit peptides to proteolysis in solution was independent of the very specific recognition of immobilized peptides by MMP-13; the enzyme proved able to cleave a range of dissolved collagen peptides.
    The Journal of biological chemistry. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is one of the mammalian collagenases that play key roles in tissue remodelling and repair and in progression of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm. For collagenase to cleave triple helical collagens, the triple helical structure has to be locally unwound before hydrolysis, but this process is not well understood. We report crystal structures of catalytically inactive full-length human MMP-13(E223A) in complex with peptides of 14-26 aa derived from the cleaved prodomain during activation. Peptides are bound to the active site of the enzyme by forming an extended β-strand with Glu(40) or Tyr(46) inserted into the S1' specificity pocket. The structure of the N-terminal part of the peptides is variable and interacts with different parts of the catalytic domain. Those areas are designated substrate-dependent exosites, in that they accommodate different peptide structures, whereas the precise positioning of the substrate backbone is maintained in the active site. These modes of peptide-MMP-13 interactions have led us to propose how triple helical collagen strands fit into the active site cleft of the collagenase.-Stura, E. A., Visse, R., Cuniasse, P., Dive, V., Nagase, H. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain.
    The FASEB Journal 08/2013; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Collagenases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family play major roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human diseases, but how they recognize and cleave the collagen triple helix is not fully understood. Here, we report temperature-dependent binding of a catalytically inactive MMP-1 mutant (E200A) to collagen through the cooperative action of its catalytic and hemopexin domains. Contact between the two molecules was mapped by screening the Collagen Toolkit peptide library and by hydrogen/deuterium exchange. The crystal structure of MMP-1(E200A) bound to a triple-helical collagen peptide revealed extensive interactions of the 115-Å-long triple helix with both MMP-1 domains. An exosite in the hemopexin domain, which binds the leucine 10 residues C-terminal to the scissile bond, is critical for collagenolysis and represents a unique target for inhibitor development. The scissile bond is not correctly positioned for hydrolysis in the crystallized complex. A productive binding mode is readily modeled, without altering the MMP-1 structure or the exosite interactions, by axial rotation of the collagen homotrimer. Interdomain flexing of the enzyme and a localized excursion of the collagen chain closest to the active site, facilitated by thermal loosening of the substrate, may lead to the first transition state of collagenolysis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 07/2012; 109(31):12461-6. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Degradation of fibrillar collagens is important in many physiological and pathological events. These collagens are resistant to most proteases due to the tightly packed triple-helical structure, but are readily cleaved at a specific site by collagenases, selected members of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the structural requirements for collagenolysis, varying numbers of GXY triplets from human type III collagen around the collagenase cleavage site were inserted between two triple helix domains of the Scl2 bacterial collagen protein. The original bacterial CL domain was not cleaved by MMP-1 (collagenase 1) or MMP-13 (collagenase 3). The minimum type III sequence necessary for cleavage by the two collagenases was 5 GXY triplets, including 4 residues before and 11 residues after the cleavage site (P4-P11'). Cleavage of these chimeric substrates was not achieved by the catalytic domain of MMP-1 or MMP-13, nor by full-length MMP-3. Kinetic analysis of the chimeras indicated that the rate of cleavage by MMP-1 of the chimera containing six triplets (P7-P11') of collagen III was similar to that of native collagen III. The collagenase-susceptible chimeras were cleaved very slowly by trypsin, a property also seen for native collagen III, supporting a local structural relaxation of the triple helix near the collagenase cleavage site. The recombinant bacterial-human collagen system characterized here is a good model to investigate the specificity and mechanism of action of collagenases.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/2012; 287(27):22988-97. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of joint pain and disability in middle-aged and elderly patients, and is characterized by progressive loss of articular cartilage. Among the various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-13 is specifically expressed in the cartilage of human OA patients and is not present in normal adult cartilage. Thus, MMP-13-selective inhibitors are promising candidates in osteoarthritis therapy. Recently, we designed an N-isopropoxy-arylsulfonamide-based hydroxamate inhibitor, which showed low nanomolar activity and high selectivity for MMP-13. In parallel to further studies aiming to assess the in vivo activity of our compound, we screened the Life Chemicals database through computational docking to seek for novel scaffolds as zinc-chelating non-hydroxamate inhibitors. Experimental evaluation of 20 selected candidate compounds verified five novel leads with IC(50) in the low μM range. These newly discovered inhibitors are structurally unrelated to the ones known so far and provide useful scaffolds to develop compounds with more desirable properties. Finally, a first round of structure-based optimization on lead 1 was accomplished and led to an increase in potency of more than 5 fold.
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 10/2011; 47(1):143-52. · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • Hideaki Nagase, Robert Visse
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    ABSTRACT: The degradation of interstitial collagens I, II and III is an integral part of many biological events such as embryonic development, organ morphogenesis, tissue remodelling and repair, and in diseases such as arthritis, cancer, atherosclerosis, aneurysm and fibrosis, but these collagens are resistant to most proteolytic enzymes due to their triple helical structures. In vertebrates, the enzymes that degrade interstitial collagens are collagenases that are members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, and cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine proteinase. Non-vertebrate collagenases include collagenolytic serine proteinases in crustacea and Clostridium histolyticum collagenases, also called “bacterial collagenases.” This chapter describes the unique properties of these collagenolytic proteinases and the current proposal as to how they recognize triple helical structures and cleave them. Potential enzymatic pathways that may be involved in the degradation of collagen fibrils are also discussed.
    07/2011: pages 95-122;
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    ABSTRACT: Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 03/2011; 286(9):7587-7600. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Biological Chemistry, v.286, 7587-7600 (2011). 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Homo-dimerization is an essential step for MT1-MMP to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin domain (Hpx)-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations in the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into 3D collagen matrix, while dimer-independent functions including gelatin film degradation and 2D cell migration were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2010; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2010; 286(9):7587-600. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have reported previously that reactive-site mutants of N-TIMP-3 [N-terminal inhibitory domain of TIMP-3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3)] modified at the N-terminus, selectively inhibited ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17) over the MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases). The primary aggrecanases ADAMTS (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) -4 and -5 are ADAM17-related metalloproteinases which are similarly inhibited by TIMP-3, but are poorly inhibited by other TIMPs. Using a newly developed recombinant protein substrate based on the IGD (interglobular domain) of aggrecan, gst-IGD-flag, these reactive-site mutants were found to similarly inhibit ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5. Further mutations of N-TIMP-3 indicated that up to two extra alanine residues can be attached to the N-terminus before the Ki (app) for ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 increased to over 100 nM. No other residues tested at the [-1] position produced inhibitors as potent as the alanine mutant. The mutants N-TIMP-3(T2G), [-1A]N-TIMP-3 and [-2A]N-TIMP-3 were effective inhibitors of aggrecan degradation, but not of collagen degradation in both IL-1α (interleukin-1α)-stimulated porcine articular cartilage explants and IL-1α with oncostatin M-stimulated human cartilage explants. Molecular modelling studies indicated that the [-1A]N-TIMP-3 mutant has additional stabilizing interactions with the catalytic domains of ADAM17, ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 that are absent from complexes with MMPs. These observations suggest that further mutation of the residues of N-TIMP-3 which make unique contacts with these metalloproteinases may allow discrimination between them.
    Biochemical Journal 10/2010; 431(1):113-22. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Collagen fibers affect metastasis in two opposing ways, by supporting invasive cells but also by generating a barrier to invasion. We hypothesized that these functions might be performed by different isoforms of type I collagen. Carcinomas are reported to contain alpha1(I)(3) homotrimers, a type I collagen isoform normally not present in healthy tissues, but the role of the homotrimers in cancer pathophysiology is unclear. In this study, we found that these homotrimers were resistant to all collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). MMPs are massively produced and used by cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts for degrading stromal collagen at the leading edge of tumor invasion. The MMP-resistant homotrimers were produced by all invasive cancer cell lines tested, both in culture and in tumor xenografts, but they were not produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts, thereby comprising a specialized fraction of tumor collagen. We observed the homotrimer fibers to be resistant to pericellular degradation, even upon stimulation of the cells with proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, we confirmed an enhanced proliferation and migration of invasive cancer cells on the surface of homotrimeric versus normal (heterotrimeric) type I collagen fibers. In summary, our findings suggest that invasive cancer cells may use homotrimers for building MMP-resistant invasion paths, supporting local proliferation and directed migration of the cells whereas surrounding normal stromal collagens are cleaved. Because the homotrimers are universally secreted by cancer cells and deposited as insoluble, MMP-resistant fibers, they offer an appealing target for cancer diagnostics and therapy.
    Cancer Research 06/2010; 70(11):4366-74. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Type I collagen cleavage is crucial for tissue remodeling, but its homotrimeric isoform is resistant to all collagenases. The homotrimers occur in fetal tissues, fibrosis, and cancer, where their collagenase resistance may play an important physiological role. To understand the mechanism of this resistance, we studied interactions of alpha1(I)(3) homotrimers and normal alpha1(I)(2)alpha2(I) heterotrimers with fibroblast collagenase (MMP-1). Similar MMP-1 binding to the two isoforms and similar cleavage efficiency of unwound alpha1(I) and alpha2(I) chains suggested increased stability and less efficient unwinding of the homotrimer triple helix at the collagenase cleavage site. The unwinding, necessary for placing individual chains inside the catalytic cleft of the enzyme, was the rate-limiting cleavage step for both collagen isoforms. Comparative analysis of the homo- and heterotrimer cleavage kinetics revealed that MMP-1 binding promotes stochastic helix unwinding, resolving the controversy between different models of collagenase action.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/2010; 285(29):22276-81. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2010; 98(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Hideaki Nagase, Robert Visse
    Drug Design of Zinc-Enzyme Inhibitors: Functional, Structural, and Disease Applications, 11/2009: pages 487 - 517; , ISBN: 9780470508169
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    ABSTRACT: Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) is a key enzyme implicated in the degradation of the extracellular matrix in osteoarthritis (OA). For this reason, MMP-13 synthetic inhibitors are being sought as potential therapeutic agents to prevent cartilage degradation and to halt the progression of OA. Herein, we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a new series of selective MMP-13 inhibitors possessing an arylsulfonamidic scaffold. Among these potential inhibitors, a very promising compound was discovered exhibiting nanomolar activity for MMP-13 and was highly selective for this enzyme compared to MMP-1, -14, and TACE. This compound acted as a slow-binding inhibitor of MMP-13 and was demonstrated to be effective in an in vitro collagen assay and in a model of cartilage degradation. Furthermore, a docking study was conducted for this compound in order to investigate its binding interactions with MMP-13 and the reasons for its selectivity toward MMP-13 versus other MMPs.
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 08/2009; 52(15):4757-73. · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Normal type I collagen is an alpha1(I)2alpha2(I) heterotrimeric triple helix, but alpha1(I)3 homotrimers are also found in fetal tissues and various pathological conditions, e.g., causing bone fragility and reducing tendon tensile strength. It remains unclear whether homotrimers alter mechanical properties of individual fibrils or affect tissues by altering their organization at a higher level. To address this question, we investigated how homotrimers affect fibril bending rigidity. Homotrimer fibrils have been shown to be more loosely packed so that we expected them to be more susceptible to bending. However, homotrimer fibrils were more rigid despite being thinner and more hydrated. To quantify fibril rigidity, we analyzed their shape by Fourier decomposition, determined the correlation function for the direction along each fibril, and calculated the distribution of local fibril curvature. The estimated persistence length of homotrimer fibrils was 3 ˜ 10 times longer than for heterotrimer fibrils, indicating much higher bending rigidity of homotrimer fibrils.
    Biophysical Journal 01/2009; 96(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human ADAM12 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) is a multidomain zinc metalloproteinase expressed at high levels during development and in human tumors. ADAM12 exists as two splice variants: a classical type 1 membrane-anchored form (ADAM12-L) and a secreted splice variant (ADAM12-S) consisting of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower affinity (9-44 nM). However, TIMP-1 is a much weaker inhibitor. N-TIMP-3 variants that lack MMP inhibitory activity but retained the ability to inhibit ADAM17/TACE failed to inhibit ADAM12. These results indicate unique enzymatic properties of ADAM12 among the members of the ADAM family of metalloproteinases.
    Biochemistry 02/2008; 47(2):537-47. · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • Matrix Biology. 01/2008; 27:29-29.
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    ABSTRACT: The hydrolysis of collagen (collagenolysis) is one of the committed steps in extracellular matrix turnover. Within the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family distinct preferences for collagen types are seen. The substrate determinants that may guide these specificities are unknown. In this study, we have utilized 12 triple-helical substrates in combination with 10 MMPs to better define the contributions of substrate sequence and thermal stability toward triple helicase activity and collagen specificity. In general, MMP-13 was found to be distinct from MMP-8 and MT1-MMP(Delta279-523), in that enhanced substrate thermal stability has only a modest effect on activity, regardless of sequence. This result correlates to the unique collagen specificity of MMP-13 compared with MMP-8 and MT1-MMP, in that MMP-13 hydrolyzes type II collagen efficiently, whereas MMP-8 and MT1-MMP are similar in their preference for type I collagen. In turn, MMP-1 was the least efficient of the collagenolytic MMPs at processing increasingly thermal stable triple helices and thus favors type III collagen, which has a relatively flexible cleavage site. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9(Delta444-707)) appear incapable of processing more stable helices and are thus mechanistically distinct from collagenolytic MMPs. The collagen specificity of MMPs appears to be based on a combination of substrate sequence and thermal stability. Analysis of the hydrolysis of triple-helical peptides by an MMP mutant indicated that Tyr(210) functions in triple helix binding and hydrolysis, but not in processing triple helices of increasing thermal stabilities. Further exploration of MMP active sites and exosites, in combination with substrate conformation, may prove valuable for additional dissection of collagenolysis and yield information useful in the design of more selective MMP inhibitors.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 01/2007; 281(50):38302-13. · 4.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
117.47 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission
      • Molecular Engineering of Proteins (SIMOPRO)
      Gif-sur-Yvette, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2012
    • University of Oxford
      • Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS)
      Oxford, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2003–2011
    • Imperial College London
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
      Maryland, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Copenhagen
      • Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC)
      Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark