Lehana Thabane

Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (347)1234.95 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Strong international commitment and the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy have led to higher longevity for people living with human immune deficiency virus (HIV). Text messaging interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes in people living with HIV. The objectives of this overview were to: map the state of the evidence of text messaging interventions, identify knowledge gaps, and develop a framework for the transfer of evidence to other chronic diseases.Methods We conducted a systematic review of systematic reviews on text messaging interventions to improve health or health related outcomes. We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE (Exerpta Medica Database), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PsycINFO, Web of Science (WoS) and the Cochrane Library on the 17th April 2014. Screening, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality were done in duplicate. Our findings were used to develop a conceptual framework for transfer.ResultsOur search identified 135 potential systematic reviews of which nine were included, reporting on 37 source studies, conducted in 19 different countries. Seven of nine (77.7%) of these reviews were high quality. There was some evidence for text messaging as a tool to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Text messages also improved attendance at appointments and behaviour change outcomes. The findings were inconclusive for self-management of illness, treatment of tuberculosis and communicating results of medical investigations. The geographical distribution of text messaging research was limited to specific regions of the world. Prominent knowledge gaps included the absence of data on long term outcomes, patient satisfaction, and economic evaluations. The included reviews also identified methodological limitations in many of the primary studies.Conclusions Global evidence supports the use of text messaging as a tool to improve adherence to medication and attendance at scheduled appointments. Given the similarities between HIV and other chronic diseases (long-term medications, life-long care, strong link to behaviour and the need for home-based support) evidence from HIV may be transferred to these diseases using our proposed framework by integration of HIV and chronic disease services or direct transfer.
    BMC Health Services Research 01/2015; 15(1):33. · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Emerging randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of green tea or green tea extract (GTE) supplementation on blood pressure (BP) among overweight and obese adults reported inconsistent findings. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the efficacy of green tea or GTE on BP among overweight and obese adults. Electronic databases, conference proceedings and gray literature were searched systematically to include parallel and cross-over RCTs examining the efficacy of green tea or GTE on BP compared with placebo. Data were meta-analyzed using a random-effects model, to compare the mean difference of the change in BP from baseline in the intervention and the placebo groups. Fourteen RCTs with 971 participants (47% women) were pooled for analysis. Green tea or GTE produced a significant effect on both SBP (mean difference -1.42 mmHg, 95% confidence interval -2.47 to -0.36, P = 0.008; I = 52%, P = 0.01 for heterogeneity) and DBP (mean difference -1.25 mmHg, 95% confidence interval -2.32 to -0.19, P = 0.02; I = 74%, P < 0.001 for heterogeneity), compared with placebo. The quality of evidence across studies was low. Similar results were found in subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Among overweight and obese adults, green tea or GTE supplementation is found to cause a small but significant reduction in BP. More high-quality RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to further confirm the efficacy on BP and make strong recommendations for green tea or GTE supplementation among the overweight and obese adults.
    Journal of hypertension. 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of implementing an interdisciplinary, multifaceted knowledge translation intervention within long-term care (LTC) and to identify any challenges that should be considered in designing future studies. Design Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting Forty LTC homes across the province of Ontario, Canada. Participants LTC teams composed of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other staff. Measurements Cluster-level feasibility measures, including recruitment, retention, data completion, and participation in the intervention. A process evaluation was completed by directors of care indicating which process/policy changes had been implemented. Results Recruitment and retention rates were 22% and 63%, respectively. Good fidelity with the intervention was achieved, including attendance at educational meetings. After ViDOS, 7 process indicators were being newly implemented by more than 50% of active intervention homes. Conclusion Despite recruitment and retention challenges, the multifaceted intervention produced a number of policy/process changes and had good intervention fidelity. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398527.
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association 12/2014; · 4.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the prospective 10-year association among incident fragility fractures and four glucocorticoid (GC) treatment groups (Never GC, Prior GC, Baseline GC, and Ever GC). Results showed that GC treatment is associated with increased 10-year incident fracture risk in ambulatory men and women across Canada. Using the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study dataset, we determined the prospective 10-year association between incident fragility fractures and GC treatment. We conducted a 10-year prospective observational cohort study at nine sites across Canada. A total of 9,263 ambulatory men and women 25 years of age and older were included in the analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses were conducted to determine the relationship among GC treatment groups in four levels that included Never GC, Prior GC, Baseline GC, and Ever GC (combined baseline and prior groups) and time to fracture. In each of the Never GC, Prior GC, Baseline GC, and Ever GC treatment groups, the number of participants were 8,832 (95.4 %), 303 (3.3 %), 128 (1.4 %), and 431 (4.7 %), respectively. Of the 9,263 individuals enrolled, incident fragility non-spine, hip, spine, and any fractures were experienced by a total of 896 (9.67 %), 157 (1.69 %), 130 (1.40 %), and 1,102 (11.90 %) over 10-years, respectively. For men and women combined, prior GC treatment was associated with a higher hazard ratio (HR) for time to incident non-vertebral (HR = 1.5, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 2.0), hip (HR = 2.1, 95 % CI = 1.1, 4.0), and any fracture (HR = 1.4, 95 % CI = 1.0, 1.8) compared with never GC treatment. GC treatment is associated with increased 10-year incident fracture risk; this highlights the importance of considering therapy to prevent GC-induced fractures for patients who are using GC for various medical conditions.
    Archives of Osteoporosis 12/2014; 9(1):169.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and substantial socioeconomic costs. Current research addressing management of chronic neuropathic pain is limited. No review has evaluated all interventional studies for chronic neuropathic pain, which limits attempts to make inferences regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments. Methods and analysis: We will conduct a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials evaluating therapies for chronic neuropathic pain. We will identify eligible trials, in any language, by a systematic search of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, HealthSTAR, DARE, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Eligible trials will be: (1) enrol patients presenting with chronic neuropathic pain, and (2) randomise patients to alternative interventions (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) or an intervention and a control arm. Pairs of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts of identified citations, review the full texts of potentially eligible trials and extract information from eligible trials. We will use a modified Cochrane instrument to evaluate risk of bias of eligible studies, recommendations from the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to inform the outcomes we will collect, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system to evaluate our confidence in treatment effects. When possible, we will conduct: (1) in direct comparisons, a random-effects meta-analysis to establish the effect of reported therapies on patient-important outcomes; and (2) a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to assess the relative effects of treatments. We will define a priori hypotheses to explain heterogeneity between studies, and conduct meta-regression and subgroup analyses consistent with the current best practices. Ethics and Dissemination: We do not require ethics approval for our proposed review. We will disseminate our findings through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations.
    BMJ Open 11/2014; 4:e006112. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Chronic pain is the most commonly reported comorbidity among patients with opioid addiction receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), with an estimated prevalence ranging between 30% and 55%. Evidence suggests that patients with comorbid pain are at high risk for poor treatment response, including continued illicit substance use. Due to the important relationship between the presence of pain and illicit substance abuse within the MMT setting, it is imperative that we target our efforts toward understanding the characteristics of this patient population. Methods: The primary objective of this study was to explore the clinical and inflammatory profile of MMT patients reporting comorbid pain. This multicenter study enrolled patients (n=235) on MMT for the treatment of opioid dependence. Clinical history and blood and urine data were collected. Blood samples were obtained for estimating the serum levels of inflam- matory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist [IL-1ra], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon [IFN]-γ and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 [CCL2]). The study objectives were addressed using a descriptive statistical summary and a multivariable logistic regression model constructed in STATA version 12. Results: Among the participants eligible for inclusion (n=235), serum IFN-γ level and sub- stance abuse behavior proved to be important delineating characteristics for the detection of comorbid pain. Analysis of inflammatory profile showed IFN-γ to be significantly elevated among patients reporting comorbid pain (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17, 3.50; P=0.01). Patients reporting comorbid pain were also found to have an increase in positive opioid urine screens (OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.03; P=0.01), indicating an increase in illicit opioid consumption. Conclusion: MMT patients with comorbid pain were shown to have elevated IFN-γ and higher rates of continued opioid abuse. The ability to objectively distinguish between patients with comorbid pain may help to both improve the prediction of poor responders to MMT as well as identify treatment approaches such as anti-inflammatory medications as safe alternatives for MMT patients with comorbid pain.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 11/2014; 10:2239-2247. · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Chronic pain is the most commonly reported comorbidity among patients with opioid addiction receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), with an estimated prevalence ranging between 30% and 55%. Evidence suggests that patients with comorbid pain are at high risk for poor treatment response, including continued illicit substance use. Due to the important relationship between the presence of pain and illicit substance abuse within the MMT setting, it is imperative that we target our efforts toward understanding the characteristics of this patient population. Methods: The primary objective of this study was to explore the clinical and inflammatory profile of MMT patients reporting comorbid pain. This multicenter study enrolled patients (n=235) on MMT for the treatment of opioid dependence. Clinical history and blood and urine data were collected. Blood samples were obtained for estimating the serum levels of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist [IL-1ra], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon [IFN]-γ and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 [CCL2]). The study objectives were addressed using a descriptive statistical summary and a multivariable logistic regression model constructed in STATA version 12. Results: Among the participants eligible for inclusion (n=235), serum IFN-γ level and substance abuse behavior proved to be important delineating characteristics for the detection of comorbid pain. Analysis of inflammatory profile showed IFN-γ to be significantly elevated among patients reporting comorbid pain (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17, 3.50; P=0.01). Patients reporting comorbid pain were also found to have an increase in positive opioid urine screens (OR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.03; P=0.01), indicating an increase in illicit opioid consumption. Conclusion: MMT patients with comorbid pain were shown to have elevated IFN-γ and higher rates of continued opioid abuse. The ability to objectively distinguish between patients with comorbid pain may help to both improve the prediction of poor responders to MMT as well as identify treatment approaches such as anti-inflammatory medications as safe alternatives for MMT patients with comorbid pain.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 11/2014; 10:2239—2247. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context: Little is known about cancer-related worry in thyroid cancer survivors. Objectives: We quantified cancer-related worry in Canadian thyroid cancer survivors and explored associated factors. Design, setting, and participants: We performed a cross-sectional, self-administered, written survey of thyroid cancer survivor members of Thyroid Cancer Canada support group. Independent factors associated with cancer-related worry were identified using a multivariable linear regression analysis. Main outcome measure: We used the Assessment of Survivor Concerns (ASC) questionnaire, which includes questions on worry about diagnostic tests, second primary malignancy, recurrence, dying, health, and children's health. Results: The response rate for eligible members was 60.1% (941/1567). Most respondents were women (89.0%, 837/940) and the age was <50 years in 54.0% of participants (508/941). Thyroid cancer was diagnosed within ≤ 5 years in 66.1% of participants (622/940). The mean overall ASC score was 15.34 (Standard Deviation 4.7) (on a scale from 6 [least worry] to 24 [most worry]). Factors associated with increased ASC score included: younger age (p<0.001), current suspected or proven recurrent/persistent disease (ie. current proven active disease or abnormal diagnostic tests (p<0.001), partnered marital status (p=0.021), having children (p=0.029), and ≤5 years since thyroid cancer diagnosis (p=0.017). Conclusions: In a population of Canadian thyroid cancer survivors, cancer-related worry was greatest in younger survivors and those with either confirmed or suspected disease activity. Family status and time since thyroid cancer diagnosis were also associated with increased worry. More research is needed to confirm these findings and to develop effective preventative and supportive strategies for those at risk.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 11/2014; · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling condition with up to a 25% cumulative lifetime risk. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is effective in relieving patients' symptoms and improving function. It is, however, associated with substantial risk of complications, pain and major functional limitation before patients can return to full function. In contrast, hip arthroscopy (HA) is less invasive and can postpone THA. However, there is no evidence regarding the delay in the need for THA that patients would find acceptable to undergoing HA. Knowing patients' values and preferences (VP) on this expected delay is critical when making recommendations regarding the advisability of HA. Furthermore, little is known on the optimal amount of information regarding interventions and outcomes needed to present in order to optimally elicit patients' VP. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a multinational, structured interview-based survey of preference in delay time for THA among patients with non-advanced OA who failed to respond to conservative therapy. We will combine these interviews with a randomised trial addressing the optimal amount of information regarding the interventions and outcomes required to elicit preferences. Eligible patients will be randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either a short or a long format of health scenarios of THA and HA. We will determine each patient's VP using a trade-off and anticipated regret exercises. Our primary outcomes for the combined surveys will be: (1) the minimal delay time in the need for THA surgery that patients would find acceptable to undertaking HA, (2) patients' satisfaction with the amount of information provided in the health scenarios used to elicit their VPs. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol has been approved by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (HIREB13-506). We will disseminate our study findings through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations, and make them available to guideline makers issuing recommendations addressing HA and THA.
    BMJ Open 10/2014; 4(10). · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Health Care Providers (HCPs) report that manual techniques of intravascular fluid resuscitation are commonly used during pediatric shock management. The optimal pediatric fluid resuscitation technique is currently unknown. We sought to determine HCP test-retest reliability (repeatability) and inter-subject variability of fluid resuscitation performance outcomes to inform the design of future studies. Methods Fifteen consenting HCPs from McMaster Children's Hospital, in Hamilton, Canada participated in this single-arm interventional trial. Participants were oriented to a non-clinical model representing a 15 kg toddler, which incorporated a 22-gauge IV catheter. Following a standardization procedure, participants administered 600 mL (40 mL/kg) of saline to the simulated child under emergency conditions using prefilled 60-mL syringes. Each participant completed 5 testing trials. All testing was video recorded, with fluid administration time outcome data (in seconds) extracted from trial videos by two blinded outcome assessors. Data describing catheter dislodgement events, volume of saline effectively delivered, and participant demographics were also collected. The primary outcome of fluid administration time test-retest reliability was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and intra-class correlation (ICC), with good reliability defined as ICC > 0.70. Results Differences in HCP fluid administration times are attributable to inter-subject variability rather than intra-subject variability based on one-way ANOVA analysis, F (14,60) = 43.125; p < 0.001. Test-retest reliability of subjects was excellent with ICC = 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.99); p < 0.001. Conclusions Findings demonstrate excellent test-retest reliability of HCP fluid resuscitation performance in a setting involving a non-clinical model. Investigators can justify a single evaluation of HCP performance in future studies.
    BMC Research Notes 10/2014; 7:724.
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    ABSTRACT: Scleroderma affects the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in 90% of all cases. Malnutrition, diarrhea, and constipation are some GI complications that can stem from scleroderma, and they contribute considerably to impairment in quality of life. Reports of haphazard clusters of high prevalence suggest that environmental exposure is a risk factor for scleroderma. However, it is largely uncertain whether the GI involvement secondary to scleroderma is influenced by these environmental factors. This study will review the association between GI involvement (unintentional weight loss, choking, early satiety, etc.) and environmental exposure in patients with scleroderma.Methods/design: Any available observational studies that report GI problems in patients with scleroderma along with the associated risk factors will be selected. We will search CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, and Web of Science for relevant articles written in English from June 1884 to May 2014. Identified articles will be screened in duplicate, and full text for selected articles will be retrieved. Data extraction will be done in duplicate on sociodemographic characteristics of participants, diagnosis of scleroderma, diagnosis of risk of GI problem, risk factors reported, etc. Discrepancies will be resolved by consensus or by consulting a third author. We will assess the participants, methods, and intervention effects of included studies for heterogeneity. Any identified clinical or statistical heterogeneity will be explored visually or using the chi-square test. Data will be pooled statistically using the DerSimmonian and Laird random effects method if we have a measure of relative risk and its imprecision. Our findings will be reported according to the Meta-Analyses and Systematic Review of Observational Studies (MOOSE) guideline.
    Systematic reviews. 10/2014; 3(1):115.
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    ABSTRACT: Changing clinician practice in pediatric critical care is often difficult. Tailored knowledge translation interventions may be more effective than other types of interventions. To inform the design of tailored interventions, the primary objective of this survey was to describe the importance of specific factors that influence physicians and pharmacists when they make decisions about medications in critically ill children.
    10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In non-inferiority trials of radiotherapy in patients with early stage breast cancer, it is inevitable that some patients will cross over from the experimental arm to the standard arm prior to initiation of any treatment due to complexities in treatment planning or subject preference. Although the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis is the preferred approach for superiority trials, its role in non-inferiority trials is still under debate. This has led to the use of alternative approaches such as the per-protocol (PP) analysis or the as-treated (AT) analysis, despite the inherent biases of such approaches.
    BMJ Open 10/2014; 4(10):e006531. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To develop and test a tool for measuring health competence. Methods In order to measure this attribute, we used a sequential exploratory mixed methods design in the rural and urban communities in Cameroon. In the qualitative phase, 67 clients constituted 10 focus group to elicit themes related to health competence. In the quantitative phase, self-rated items were tested on 300 participants and on a random selection of 25 participants two weeks later. Results The internal consistency for the subscales derived varied from 0.61-0.81. Older (F[45,339.1] = 1.2; p = 0.031) and more educated (F [3,22.6] = 2.1;p = 0.004) people were more likely to score higher on the scale. Interviewers also contributed to the variance (F [5,37.6] = 3.6;p < 0.001). Test- retest reliability was 0.66. The final scale with 15 items is made up of three subscales: knowledge of disease, how to stay in good health and health information. Conclusion We present a new self-rated scale for health competence with good psychometric properties. It circumvents the need to be literate, but requires well trained interviewers. We recommend that it be tested in other settings. Practice implications This tool should be used to appraise individual and community health education needs with minor context specific modifications.
    Patient Education and Counseling 10/2014; · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mobile phone text messaging has been shown to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy and to improve communication between patients and health care workers. It is unclear which strategies are most appropriate for scaling up text messaging programmes. We sought to investigate community acceptability and readiness for ownership (community members designing, sending and receiving text messages) of a text message programme among a community of clients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Yaounde, Cameroon and to develop a framework for implementation.
    BMC Health Services Research 09/2014; 14(1):441. · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clustering of outcomes at centers involved in multicenter trials is a type of center effect. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement recommends that multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should account for center effects in their analysis, however most do not. The Early External Cephalic Version (EECV) trials published in 2003 and 2011 stratified by center at randomization, but did not account for center in the analyses, and due to the nature of the intervention and number of centers, may have been prone to center effects. Using data from the EECV trials, we undertook an empirical study to compare various statistical approaches to account for center effect while estimating the impact of external cephalic version timing (early or delayed) on the outcomes of cesarean section, preterm birth, and non-cephalic presentation at the time of birth.
    Trials 09/2014; 15(1):377. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Opioids are psychoactive analgesic drugs prescribed for pain relief and palliative care. Due to their addictive potential, effort and vigilance in controlling prescriptions is needed to avoid misuse and dependence. Despite the effort, the prevalence of opioid use disorder continues to rise. Opioid substitution therapies are commonly used to treat opioid dependence; however, there is minimal consensus as to which therapy is most effective. Available treatments include methadone, heroin, buprenorphine, as well as naltrexone. This systematic review aims to assess and compare the effect of all available opioid substitution therapies on the treatment of opioid dependence.
    Systematic reviews. 09/2014; 3(1):105.
  • Science (New York, N.Y.). 09/2014; 345(6202):1244-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate whether the addition of a wraparound facilitator to regular child protection services improved child and family functioning over 20 months. Method: A single blind randomized controlled trial with concealment and stratification across three sites (N = 135 eligible families with substantiated maltreatment). Results: Based on 2x2 mixed analysis of variance and intention to treat, both groups improved in child impairments, d = .60 [.81, .39], caregiver psychological distress, d = .33 [.52, .13], and family resources, d = .44 [.27, .62]. No measurable benefit was associated with the intervention (e.g., child impairments, d = .14 [.12, .52]). However, treatment fidelity analysis revealed that many components of wraparound were either missing or present in both groups. Conclusions: The presence of a facilitator alone did not appear to improve child or family functioning if the various components of wraparound were not adequately implemented.
    Research on Social Work Practice. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Tuberculous pericarditis is associated with high morbidity and mortality even if antituberculosis therapy is administered. We evaluated the effects of adjunctive glucocorticoid therapy and Mycobacterium indicus pranii immunotherapy in patients with tuberculous pericarditis. Methods Using a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned 1400 adults with definite or probable tuberculous pericarditis to either prednisolone or placebo for 6 weeks and to either M. indicus pranii or placebo, administered in five injections over the course of 3 months. Two thirds of the participants had concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The primary efficacy outcome was a composite of death, cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis, or constrictive pericarditis. Results There was no significant difference in the primary outcome between patients who received prednisolone and those who received placebo (23.8% and 24.5%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 1.18; P=0.66) or between those who received M. indicus pranii immunotherapy and those who received placebo (25.0% and 24.3%, respectively; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.29; P=0.81). Prednisolone therapy, as compared with placebo, was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of constrictive pericarditis (4.4% vs. 7.8%; hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.87; P=0.009) and hospitalization (20.7% vs. 25.2%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.99; P=0.04). Both prednisolone and M. indicus pranii, each as compared with placebo, were associated with a significant increase in the incidence of cancer (1.8% vs. 0.6%; hazard ratio, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.07 to 10.03; P=0.03, and 1.8% vs. 0.5%; hazard ratio, 3.69; 95% CI, 1.03 to 13.24; P=0.03, respectively), owing mainly to an increase in HIV-associated cancer. Conclusions In patients with tuberculous pericarditis, neither prednisolone nor M. indicus pranii had a significant effect on the composite of death, cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis, or constrictive pericarditis. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and others; IMPI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00810849 .).
    New England Journal of Medicine 09/2014; · 54.42 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
1,234.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Population Health Research Institute
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    • Groote Schuur Hospital
      Kaapstad, Western Cape, South Africa
    • Hamilton University
      Little Canada, Minnesota, United States
    • Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital
      Port Natal, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • 2004–2014
    • St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 2003–2014
    • McMaster University
      • • Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Centre for Evaluation of Medicines
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 2012–2013
    • Hopital Central de Yaoundé
      Jaúnde, Centre Region, Cameroon
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    • Hamilton Health Sciences
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    • Vertex Pharmaceuticals
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2008–2013
    • University of Waterloo
      • Department of Kinesiology
      Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • 2006–2011
    • University of Toronto
      • • Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing
      • • Department of Medicine
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2008–2010
    • University Health Network
      • Department of Medicine
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada