Patrick K Ha

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (62)217.93 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for pharyngocutaneous fistula in patients undergoing total laryngectomy at a single institution. Materials and Methods The records of 59 patients undergoing primary or salvage total laryngectomy at our institution from 2001–2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included patient, tumor and treatment characteristics, and surgical technique. Risk factors were analyzed for association with pharyngocutaneous fistula formation. Results Twenty patients (34%) developed fistulas. Preoperative tracheostomy (OR 4.1; 95% CI 1.3-13 [p = 0.02]) and low postoperative hemoglobin (OR 9.1; 95% CI 1.1-78 [p = 0.04]) were associated with fistula development. Regarding surgical technique, primary sutured closure of the total laryngectomy defect had the lowest fistula rate (11%). In comparison, primary stapled closure and pectoralis onlay flap over primary closure had nonsignificantly increased fistula rates (43%, OR 6.0; 95% CI 1.0-37.3 [p = 0.06] and 25%, OR 2.7; 95% CI 0.4-23.9 [p = 0.38], respectively). Pectoralis flap incorporated into the suture line had a significantly increased fistula rate (50%, OR 7.1; 95% CI 1.4-46 [p = 0.02]). After stratification for salvage status, patient comorbidities were associated with fistula in non-salvage cases whereas disease-related characteristics were associated with fistula in salvage cases. Fistula development was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p < 0.001) and increased time before oral diet initiation (p < 0.001). Conclusions Pharyngocutaneous fistula is a common complication of total laryngectomy. Preoperative tracheostomy, postoperative hemoglobin, and surgical technique are important in determining the risk of fistula.
    American Journal of Otolaryngology 09/2014; · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of death in cancer patients. However, the mechanisms that underlie metastatic progression remain unclear. We examined TMEM16A (ANO1) expression as a key factor shifting tumors between growth and metastasis. Experimental Design: We evaluated 26 pairs of primary and metastatic lymph node tissue from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) for differential expression of TMEM16A. Additionally, we identified mechanisms by which TMEM16A expression influences tumor cell motility via proteomic screens of cell lines and in vivo mouse studies of metastasis. Results: Compared to primary tumors, TMEM16A expression decreases in metastatic lymph nodes of patients with SCCHN. Stable reduction of TMEM16A expression enhances cell motility and increases metastases while decreasing tumor proliferation in an orthotopic mouse model. Evaluation of human tumor tissues suggests an epigenetic mechanism for decreasing TMEM16A expression through promoter methylation that correlated with a transition between an epithelial and a mesenchymal phenotype. These effects of TMEM16A expression on tumor cell size and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) required the amino acid residue, serine 970 (S970); however, mutation of S970 to alanine does not disrupt the proliferative advantages of TMEM16A overexpression. Further, S970 mediates the association of TMEM16A with Radixin, an actin-scaffolding protein implicated in EMT. Conclusions: Together, our results identify TMEM16A, an eight trans-membrane domain Ca2+-activated Cl- channel, as a primary driver of the "Grow" or "Go" model for cancer progression, in which TMEM16A expression acts to balance tumor proliferation and metastasis via its promoter methylation.
    Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although human papillomavirus detection in cervical lymph nodes of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC) of unknown primary site (UP) is indicative of a primary tumor of the oropharynx (OP), localization can remain elusive. Therefore, we investigated ultrasonography (US) for the identification of the primary tumor. Eligible cases had HNSCC of UP after evaluation by a head and neck surgical oncologist. Controls were healthy volunteers. Transcervical and intraoral ultrasonography was performed by a standard protocol using convex (3.75-6.0MHz and 5-7.5MHz) transducers. US findings were compared with operative examination (exam under anesthesia, direct laryngoscopy) and biopsies. The primary outcome of interest was the presence or absence of a lesion on US. 10 cases and 20 controls were enrolled. PET/CT scans were negative/nonspecific (9), or suspicious (1) for a primary lesion. On US, predominantly hypoechoic (9 of 10) lesions were visualized consistent with base of tongue (n=7) or tonsil (n=3) primary tumors. On operative examination, 5 of 10 were appreciated. Two additional primaries were confirmed with biopsies "directed" by preoperative US. This represents an overall diagnostic rate of 70%, which is 20% higher than our detection rate for 2008-2010. The three cases in which a suspicious lesion was visualized on US, yet remained UP despite further interventions, could represent false positives, misclassification or operator variability. No lesions were suspected among the controls. Ultrasound has promise for detection of UPs of the OP and therefore warrants further investigation.
    Oral Oncology 05/2014; · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is firmly established as an important cause of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Recent studies have also implicated HPV as a cause of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC)-a tumor of salivary gland origin that frequently harbors MAML2 translocations. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of transcriptionally active HPV in a large group of MECs and to determine whether HPV infection and the MAML2 translocation are mutually exclusive events. Break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MAML2 was performed on a tissue microarray containing 92 MECs. HPV testing was performed using RNA in situ hybridization targeting high risk HPV mRNA E6/E7 transcripts. Of the 71 MECs that could be evaluated by FISH, 57 (80 %) harbored the MAML2 rearrangement. HPV was not detected in any of the 57 MECs that contained a MAML2 rearrangement, in any of the 14 MECs that did not contain the rearrangement, or in any of the 21 MECs where MAML2 status was unknown. High risk HPV does not appear to play any significant role in the development of MEC. It neither complements nor replaces MAML2 translocation in the tumorigenesis of MEC.
    Head and Neck Pathology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is a candidate oncogene that is epigenetically modified in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). We sought to (1) assess AQP1 promoter methylation and expression in an ACC cohort, (2) identify correlations between AQP1 and clinical outcomes, and (3) explore the role of AQP1 in tumor progression in vitro. Laboratory study, retrospective chart review. Academic medical center. DNA and RNA were isolated from ACC tumors and control salivary gland tissues. Quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on bisulfite-treated DNA. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was performed after cDNA synthesis. Cell lines stably overexpressing an AQP1 plasmid or empty vector were generated. Cell scratch and Matrigel invasion assays were performed. Retrospective chart review was performed for collection of clinical information. Methylation results from 77 tumors and 30 controls demonstrated that AQP1 was hypomethylated in tumors (P < .0001). Fifty-eight tumors (75.3%) displayed AQP1 hypomethylation compared with controls. AQP1 expression levels assessed in 58 tumors and 23 controls demonstrated a trend toward increased expression in tumors (P = .08). Univariate analysis revealed that AQP1 hypermethylation was associated with increased overall survival. No associations between AQP1 expression level and survival were found. AQP1 overexpression did not affect cell migratory or invasive capacities in vitro. AQP1 promoter hypomethylation is common in ACC, and AQP1 tends to be overexpressed in these tumors. Increased AQP1 methylation is associated with improved prognosis on univariate analysis, but expression is not associated with outcomes. Further in vitro studies are necessary to clarify the role of AQP1 in ACC.
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 02/2014; · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Base of tongue (BOT) is a difficult subsite to examine clinically and radiographically. Yet, anatomic delineation of the primary tumor site, its extension to adjacent sites or across midline, and endophytic vs. exophytic extent are important characteristics for staging and treatment planning. We hypothesized that ultrasound could be used to visualize and describe BOT tumors. Transcervical ultrasound was performed using a standardized protocol in cases and controls. Cases had suspected or confirmed BOT malignancy. Controls were healthy individuals without known malignancy. 100% of BOT tumors were visualized. On ultrasound BOT tumors were hypoechoic (90.9%) with irregular margins (95.5%). Ultrasound could be used to characterize adjacent site involvement, midline extent, and endophytic extent, and visualize the lingual artery. No tumors were suspected for controls. Ultrasonography can be used to transcervically visualize BOT tumors and provides clinically relevant characteristics that may not otherwise be appreciable.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(1):e87565. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective A standardized assay to determine the HPV status of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) specimens has not yet been established, particularly for cytologic samples. The goal of this study was to determine whether the hybrid capture-2 (HC-2) assay, already widely used for the detection of high risk HPV in cervical brushings, is applicable to cytologic specimens obtained from patients with suspected HNSCCs. Materials and methods Fine needle aspirates (FNA) of cervical lymph nodes were pre-operatively obtained from patients with suspected HNSCCs and evaluated for the presence of HPV using the HC-2 assay. HPV analysis was performed on the corresponding resected tissue specimens using p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and HR-HPV in situ hybridization (ISH). A cost analysis was performed using the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Results HPV status of the cervical lymph node metastases was correctly classified using the HC-2 assay in 84% (21/25) of cases. Accuracy was improved to 100% when cytologic evaluation confirmed the presence of cancer cells in the test samples. The estimated cost savings to CMS using the HC-2 assay ranged from $113.74 to $364.63 per patient. Conclusions HC-2 is a reliable method for determining the HPV status of HNSCCs. Its application to HNSCCs may reduce costs by helping to localize the primary site during the diagnostic work-up as well as decrease the interval time of determining the HPV status which would be relevant for providing prognostic information to the patient as well as determining eligibility for clinical trials targeting this unique patient population.
    Oral Oncology 01/2014; · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNA-21 (miRNA-21) has proto-oncogenic properties, though no miRNA-21 specific targets have been found in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Further study of miRNA-21 and its specific targets is essential to understanding HNSCC biology. miRNA expression profiles of 10 HNSCC and 10 normal mucosa samples were investigated using a custom miRNA microarray. 13 HNSCC and 5 normal mucosa primary tissue specimens underwent mRNA expression microarray analysis. To identify miRNA-21 downstream targets, oral keratinocyte cells were subjected to microarray analysis after miRNA-21 transient transfection. miRNA and mRNA expression were validated by RT-qPCR in a separate cohort of 16 HNSCC and 15 normal mucosal samples. Microarray and bioinformatics analyses were integrated to identify potential gene targets. In vitro assays looked at the function and interaction of miRNA-21 and its specific gene targets. miRNA-21 was upregulated in HNSCC and stimulated cell growth. Integrated analyses identified Clusterin (CLU) as a potential miRNA-21 gene target. CLU was downregulated after forced expression of miRNA-21 in normal and HNSCC cell lines. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the 3'UTR of CLU was repressed by the ectopic expression of miRNA-21. CLU was also found to be downregulated in primary HNSCC and correlated with miRNA-21 over-expression. A CLU variant 1 (CLU-1) was the predominant splice variant in HNSCC, and showed growth suppression function that was reversed by miRNA-21 over-expression. CLU is a specific, functional target of oncogenic miRNA-21 in HNSCC. CLU-1 isoform is the predominant growth suppressive variant targeted by miRNA-21.
    Clinical Cancer Research 12/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To report a single institution's experience with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and its clinical outcomes. This was a retrospective study carried out at a university-affiliated teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: Forty-four consecutive TORS patients with benign and malignant diseases were reviewed. Data on demographics, clinical parameters, and diet were collected. Surgical margins, local and regional recurrence, distant metastasis, 2-year disease-free survival rate, and 2-year survival data were reviewed for the malignant cases. Results: Nine benign and 35 proven squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) cases underwent TORS. The set-up time was 17.12 minutes (range, 10-40 minutes), and operative time was 53 minutes (range, 10-300 minutes). Average length of stay was 2.5 days. There were seven (6.8%) grade 3 surgical complications. Surgical infection rate was 2.3%. Benign cases were on a regular diet after TORS. Of the malignant cases, 94% were taking peroral diet immediately after the TORS procedure. There were no intraoperative complications and no 30-day postoperative mortalities. The mean follow-up time was 25.2 months (range, 16-38 months) for malignant disease. The SCCA sites were in the oropharynx (30/35), larynx (2/35), and unknown primary with neck metastasis (3/35). Unknown primary patients were excluded in the surgical margin analyses. Negative margins were achieved in 91% of cases. The local and regional recurrence rates were 6.3% (2/32) and 3.1% (1/32), respectively. Two patients (6.3%) developed distant metastasis. Oropharyngeal SCCA cases were reviewed, of which 23 were human papillomavirus (HPV)/p16 positive and 7 were HPV/p16 negative. The 2-year actual survival for HPV-positive and -negative patients was 96% (22/23) and 86% (6/7), respectively. The 2-year disease-free survival for HPV-positive and -negative cases was 91% (21/23) and 71.4% (5/7), respectively. All malignant cases that underwent TORS received postoperative adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: TORS is a safe procedure with minimal complications and acceptable clinical and functional outcomes.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 10/2013; · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Salivary gland tumors (SGT) are a group of highly heterogeneous head and neck malignancies with widely varied clinical outcomes and no standard effective treatments. The CRTC1-MAML2 fusion oncogene, encoded by a recurring chromosomal translocation t(11;19)(q14-21;p12-13), is a frequent genetic alteration found in >50% of mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC), the most common malignant SGT. In this study, we aimed to define the role of the CRTC1-MAML2 oncogene in the maintenance of MEC tumor growth and to investigate critical downstream target genes and pathways for therapeutic targeting of MEC. By performing gene expression analyses and functional studies via RNA interference and pharmacological modulation, we determined the importance of the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion gene and its downstream AREG-EGFR signaling in human MEC cancer cell growth and survival in vitro and in vivo using human MEC xenograft models. We found that CRTC1-MAML2 fusion oncogene was required for the growth and survival of fusion-positive human MEC cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein induced the upregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand Amphiregulin (AREG) by co-activating the transcription factor CREB, and AREG subsequently activated EGFR signaling in an autocrine manner that promoted MEC cell growth and survival. Importantly, CRTC1-MAML2-positive MEC cells were highly sensitive to EGFR signaling inhibition. Therefore, our study revealed that aberrantly activated AREG-EGFR signaling is required for CRTC1-MAML2-positive MEC cell growth and survival, suggesting that EGFR-targeted therapies will benefit patients with advanced, unresectable CRTC1-MAML2-positive MEC.Oncogene advance online publication, 26 August 2013; doi:10.1038/onc.2013.348.
    Oncogene 08/2013; · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is the second most common genitourinary malignant disease in the USA, and tobacco smoking is the major known risk factor for UCC development. Exposure to carcinogens, such as those contained in tobacco smoke, is known to directly or indirectly damage DNA, causing mutations, chromosomal deletion events and epigenetic alterations in UCC. Molecular studies have shown that chromosome 9 alterations and P53, RAS, RB and PTEN mutations are among the most frequent events in UCC. Recent studies suggested that continuous tobacco carcinogen exposure drives and enhances the selection of epigenetically altered cells in UCC, predominantly in the invasive form of the disease. However, the sequence of molecular events that leads to UCC after exposure to tobacco smoke is not well understood. To elucidate molecular events that lead to UCC oncogenesis and progression after tobacco exposure, we developed an in vitro cellular model for smoking-induced UCC. SV-40 immortalized normal HUC1 human bladder epithelial cells were continuously exposed to 0.1% cigarette smoke extract (CSE) until transformation occurred. Morphological alterations and increased cell proliferation of non-malignant urothelial cells were observed after 4 mo of treatment with CSE. Anchorage-independent growth assessed by soft agar assay and increase in the migratory and invasive potential was observed in urothelial cells after 6 mo of CSE treatment. By performing a PCR mRNA expression array specific to the PI3K-AKT pathway, we found that 26 genes were upregulated and 22 genes were downregulated after 6 mo of CSE exposure of HUC1 cells. Among the altered genes, PTEN, FOXO1, MAPK1 and PDK1 were downregulated in the transformed cells, while AKT1, AKT2, HRAS, RAC1 were upregulated. Validation by RT-PCR and western blot analysis was then performed. Furthermore, genome-wide methylation analysis revealed MCAM, DCC and HIC1 are hypermethylated in CSE-treated urothelial cells when compared with non-CSE exposed cells. The methylation status of these genes was validated using quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP), confirming an increase in methylation of CSE-treated urothelial cells compared to untreated controls. Therefore, our findings suggest that a tobacco signature could emerge from distinctive patterns of genetic and epigenetic alterations and can be identified using an in vitro cellular model for the development of smoking-induced cancer.
    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 02/2013; 12(7). · 5.24 Impact Factor
  • The Laryngoscope 02/2013; · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The introduction of robotics in head and neck surgery has facilitated access to the contents of the neck region using less cosmetically obtrusive incisions. Robotic systems offer a three-dimensional viewing, tremor filtration, and articulating distal arms that mimic natural hand and wrist movements. We hypothesized that these characteristics would allow for the performance of a robotic-assisted selective and comprehensive neck dissection via combined pre- and post-auricular incisions. We were able to demonstrate adequate access in a cadaver, using a combination of conventional, endoscopic, and robotic surgical manipulation. Thus preclinical cadaver studies support the ability to perform robotic-assisted neck dissection via combined pre- and post-auricular incisions.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 10/2012; 22(8):791-6. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the feasibility and safety of neck dissection through a facelift incision. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective case series. METHODS: Cadavers and live subjects underwent neck dissection using a facelift incision with and without endoscopic assistance. In the live facelift neck dissection (FLND), the preoperative surgical indications, staging, adjuvant therapy, intraoperative technical procedure, pathology reports on lymph nodes, and short-term outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS: FLND was successfully performed in four cadavers and four live subjects, including selective (less than five neck levels removed) and comprehensive (levels I-V removed) neck dissections. All levels were accessible through this approach, with additional retraction required for levels I and IV. Endoscopic assistance was required in one neck dissection for adequate visualization. Short-term complications and number of excised lymph nodes were comparable to those from traditional neck dissection approaches. CONCLUSIONS: Open neck dissection through a facelift incision is feasible and offers an alternate approach to traditional incisions. This can be performed without requiring robotic assistance and with endoscopic assistance only in certain cases. Endoscopic assistance can offer enhanced visualization of the surgical field and complement open direct approaches in neck dissection. Although FLND offers improved cosmetic outcomes when compared to those of traditional neck incisions, further study is required to determine its efficacy and indications.
    The Laryngoscope 09/2012; · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a robotic surgery training regimen integrating objective skill assessment for otolaryngology and head and neck surgery trainees consisting of training modules of increasing complexity leading up to procedure-specific training. In particular, we investigated applications of such a training approach for surgical extirpation of oropharyngeal tumors via a transoral approach using the da Vinci robotic system. Prospective blinded data collection and objective evaluation (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills [OSATS]) of three distinct phases using the da Vinci robotic surgical system in an academic university medical engineering/computer science laboratory setting. Between September 2010 and July 2011, eight otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents and four staff experts from an academic hospital participated in three distinct phases of robotic surgery training involving 1) robotic platform operational skills, 2) set up of the patient side system, and 3) a complete ex vivo surgical extirpation of an oropharyngeal tumor located in the base of tongue. Trainees performed multiple (four) approximately equally spaced training sessions in each stage of the training. In addition to trainees, baseline performance data were obtained for the experts. Each surgical stage was documented with motion and event data captured from the application programming interfaces of the da Vinci system, as well as separate video cameras as appropriate. All data were assessed using automated skill measures of task efficiency and correlated with structured assessment (OSATS and similar Likert scale) from three experts to assess expert and trainee differences and compute automated and expert assessed learning curves. Our data show that such training results in an improved didactic robotic knowledge base and improved clinical efficiency with respect to the set up and console manipulation. Experts (e.g., average OSATS, 25; standard deviation [SD], 3.1; module 1, suturing) and trainees (average OSATS, 15.9; SD, 3.9; week 1) are well separated at the beginning of the training, and the separation reduces significantly (expert average OSATS, 27.6; SD, 2.7; trainee average OSATS, 24.2; SD, 6.8; module 3) at the conclusion of the training. Learning curves in each of the three stages show diminishing differences between the experts and trainees, which is also consistent with expert assessment. Subjective assessment by experts verified the clinical utility of the module 3 surgical environment, and a survey of trainees consistently rated the curriculum as very useful in progression to human operating room assistance. Structured curricular robotic surgery training with objective assessment promises to reduce the overhead for mentors, allow detailed assessment of human-machine interface skills, and create customized training models for individualized training. This preliminary study verifies the utility of such training in improving human-machine operations skills (module 1), and operating room and surgical skills (modules 2 and 3). In contrast to current coarse measures of total operating time and subjective assessment of error for short mass training sessions, these methods may allow individual tasks to be removed from the trainee regimen when skill levels are within the standard deviation of the experts for these tasks, which can greatly enhance overall efficiency of the training regimen and allow time for additional and more complex training to be incorporated in the same time frame. Laryngoscope, 2012.
    The Laryngoscope 08/2012; 122(10):2184-92. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Testis-specific transcription factor BORIS (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites), a paralog and proposed functional antagonist of the widely expressed CTCF, is abnormally expressed in multiple tumor types and has been implicated in the epigenetic activation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs). We have reported previously that suprabasin (SBSN), whose expression is restricted to the epidermis, is epigenetically derepressed in lung cancer. In this work, we establish that SBSN is a novel non-CTA target of BORIS epigenetic regulation. With the use of a doxycycline-inducible BORIS expressing vector, we demonstrate that relative BORIS dosage is critical for SBSN activation. At lower concentrations, BORIS induces demethylation of the SBSN CpG island and disruption and activation of chromatin around the SBSN transcription start site (TSS), resulting in a 35-fold increase in SBSN expression in the H358 human lung cancer cell line. Interestingly, increasing BORIS concentrations leads to a subsequent reduction in SBSN expression via chromatin repression. In a similar manner, increase in BORIS concentrations leads to eventual decrease of cell growth and colony formation. This is the first report demonstrating that different amount of BORIS defines its varied effects on the expression of a target gene via chromatin structure reorganization.
    PLoS ONE 07/2012; 7(7):e40389. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The optimal dosage and frequency of platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimen for treating advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains unresolved. This study aims to compare the toxicity and efficacy of weekly versus more dose-intensive cisplatin-based CRTs. We reviewed 155 stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with no evidence of distant metastasis treated with one of two CRT regimens from 2000 to 2010 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Twice-daily radiation was provided as a split course over a 45-day period. Regimen A consisted of concomitant cisplatin (30 mg/m2/1 h) weekly for 6 cycles; regimen B consisted of concomitant cisplatin (12 mg/m2/1 h) and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) on days 1 through 5 and days 29 through 33. Main outcome measures included acute toxicities (myelosuppression, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal dysfunction), unplanned hospitalizations, and disease control at 12 months. Patients on regimen A were much less likely to experience ototoxicity due to their treatment (0% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.04). They were more likely to experience thrombocytopenia acutely (46% vs. 26%, P = 0.02), but the toxicity was not limiting (grade 1–2). No significant differences exist in the incidence of other toxicities or unplanned hospitalizations. At 1 year, 97% of patients on A vs. 86% of patients on regimen B were free of disease (P = 0.11). With concurrent radiotherapy, low-dose, single-agent, weekly cisplatin is less likely than higher-dose daily cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil provided at the beginning and end of treatment to be associated with ototoxicity. The preliminary data suggest at least equivalent efficacy, but longer follow-up is required.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 01/2012; 19(6):1980-7. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m(2)/h) daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m(2)/20 h) daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and disease-free survival (DFS). Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events.
    International Journal of Otolaryngology 01/2012; 2012:754191.
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    ABSTRACT: Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of amifostine on submandibular gland histology in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective submandibular gland histologic slide review of HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with three different levels of amifostine exposure. We used six scoring parameters: fatty replacement, lobular architecture degeneration, interstitial fibrosis, ductal degeneration, acinar degeneration, and inflammatory component presence. Results. Differences in gender, tumor stage, amifostine dose, age, number of days after neck dissection, and smoking history (pack years) exposure were not significant between the three groups, although there was a difference between groups in the primary subsite (P = 0.006). The nonparametric Cuzick's test for histologic parameters with varied amifostine treatment showed no significance among the three groups. Conclusions. Although patients did not receive a full dose of amifostine due to side effects, varying doses of amifostine had no apparent evident cytoprotective effects in three groups of cancer patients treated with primary chemoradiation.
    International Journal of Otolaryngology 01/2012; 2012:508279.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare cancer, accounting for only 1% of all head and neck malignancies. ACC is well known for perineural invasion and distant metastasis, but its underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis are still unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that a novel oncogenic candidate, suprabasin (SBSN), plays important roles in maintaining the anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent cell proliferation in ACC by using SBSN shRNA stably transfected ACC cell line clones. SBSN is also important in maintaining the invasive/metastatic capability in ACC by Matrigel invasion assay. More interestingly, SBSN transcription is significantly upregulated by DNA demethylation induced by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine plus trichostatin A treatment and the DNA methylation levels of the SBSN CpG island located in the second intron were validated to be significantly hypomethylated in primary ACC samples versus normal salivary gland tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results support SBSN as novel oncogene candidate in ACC, and the methylation changes could be a promising biomarker for ACC.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(11):e48582. · 3.53 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
217.93 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2014
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      • Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2002–2013
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
      • • Department of Surgery
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2012
    • New York Medical College
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Department of Otolaryngology
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004
    • The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery
      Evans Head, New South Wales, Australia