Xavier Rebillard

Clinique Beau-Soleil, Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

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Publications (94)268.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The side effects of PBs have played a role in the controversy over screening for prostate cancer. We aimed to measure the precise incidence of post-PB infections and to show their risk factors.
    The Journal of urology. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case-control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. EPICAP is a population-based case-control study conducted in the departement of Herault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the departement of Herault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the departement of Herault, recruited in the general population.The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014).The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic factors through a detailed questionnaire, (4) role of individual genetic susceptibility of genes involved in biological pathways of interest. The EPICAP study will also allow us to study prognostic factors and tumor aggressiveness.Taken together, the EPICAP study will provide a comprehensive framework to go further in the understanding of prostate cancer occurrence and its prognosis.
    BMC Cancer 02/2014; 14(1):106. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evaluation kits PSA conducted in 2004 by AFSSAPS resumed in 2012 using the same methodology to update the performance of assays available on the French market. Preference should be given to equimolar and accurate assays of PSA for uniform clinical use and correct kinetic monitoring.
    Medecine Nucleaire 02/2014; · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The European Randomised study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) has shown significant reductions in prostate cancer mortality after 9 years and 11 years of follow-up, but screening is controversial because of adverse events such as overdiagnosis. We provide updated results of mortality from prostate cancer with follow-up to 2010, with analyses truncated at 9, 11, and 13 years. Methods ERSPC is a multicentre, randomised trial with a predefined centralised database, analysis plan, and core age group (55–69 years), which assesses prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in eight European countries. Eligible men aged 50–74 years were identified from population registries and randomly assigned by computer generated random numbers to screening or no intervention (control). Investigators were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was prostate cancer mortality in the core age group. Analysis was by intention to treat. We did a secondary analysis that corrected for selection bias due to non-participation. Only incidence and no mortality data at 9 years’ follow-up are reported for the French centres. This study is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN49127736. Findings With data truncated at 13 years of follow-up, 7408 prostate cancer cases were diagnosed in the intervention group and 6107 cases in the control group. The rate ratio of prostate cancer incidence between the intervention and control groups was 1·91 (95% CI 1·83–1·99) after 9 years (1·64 [1·58–1·69] including France), 1·66 (1·60–1·73) after 11 years, and 1·57 (1·51–1·62) after 13 years. The rate ratio of prostate cancer mortality was 0·85 (0·70–1·03) after 9 years, 0·78 (0·66–0·91) after 11 years, and 0·79 (0·69–0·91) at 13 years. The absolute risk reduction of death from prostate cancer at 13 years was 0·11 per 1000 person-years or 1·28 per 1000 men randomised, which is equivalent to one prostate cancer death averted per 781 (95% CI 490–1929) men invited for screening or one per 27 (17–66) additional prostate cancer detected. After adjustment for non-participation, the rate ratio of prostate cancer mortality in men screened was 0·73 (95% CI 0·61–0·88). Interpretation In this update the ERSPC confirms a substantial reduction in prostate cancer mortality attributable to testing of PSA, with a substantially increased absolute effect at 13 years compared with findings after 9 and 11 years. Despite our findings, further quantification of harms and their reduction are still considered a prerequisite for the introduction of populated-based screening. Funding Each centre had its own funding responsibility.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 12/2013; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess oncologic outcomes after salvage radiotherapy (SRT) without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with persistently detectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RT). Two hundred and one patients who failed to achieve an undetectable PSA received SRT without ADT. The primary endpoint was failure to SRT that was defined by clinical progression or use of second-line ADT. Clinicopathological parameters, 6-week PSA level, PSAV and pre-SRT PSA levels were assessed using time-dependent analyses. Median postoperative 6-week PSA and pre-SRT PSA levels were 0.25 and 0.48 ng/mL, respectively. Median time between surgery and SRT was 7 months. Failure to SRT was reported in 42.8 % of cases with the need for second-line ADT in 26.9 % of cases. Pre-SRT PSA was strongly correlated with postoperative 6-week PSA (p < 0.001) but not with PSAV. The risk of SRT failure was increased by threefold in case of Gleason score 8-10 (p = 0.036) or pT3b cancer (p = 0.006). Risk group classification based on these prognostic factors improved SRT failure prediction. Survival curves confirmed that 5-year ADT-free survival rates were significantly influenced by PSAV (p = 0.002) and pre-SRT PSA (p = 0.030). In patients with persistently detectable PSA after RP and selected for local salvage treatment, SRT offers good oncologic clinical outcomes. The most powerful pathologic predictive factors of SRT failure include a pT3b stage, a Gleason score 8 or more cancer and high PSAV and pre-SRT PSA levels. Patients having a high PSAV >0.04 ng/mL/mo would be potentially better candidates for a systemic therapy due to a high SRT failure rate.
    World Journal of Urology 11/2013; · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Present national estimations of the incidence and mortality trends in urological cancers in France between 1980 and 2012. Francim database and French Register of Cancers. Analysis of the current data shows a regular increase of the incidence of renal cancer in men and women (7 781 cases in men and 3 792 in women in 2012). For bladder cancer, trends are divergent. There is a small reduction in incidence for men and an increase for women (9 549 cases in men and 2416 in women in 2012). Testicular cancer is still increasing slightly (2 317 incidental cases in 2012). The incidence of prostate cancer experienced a huge increase up until 2005, and thereafter it decreased sharply, though it is difficult to discern whether this drop (which was observed up until 2008) continued at the same rate after that point (56 841 incidences in 2012 based on the rates calculated for 2009). The analyses by organ database show that there are significant variations in the incidence of urological cancers, particularly for prostate cancer, which shows that both the natural history of urological tumours and the methods of detection have an impact on incidence.
    Progrès en Urologie 11/2013; 23 Suppl 2:S57-65. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The sub Comittee prostate of the CCAFU established guidelines for diagnostic, treatment, evaluation and standart of care of prostate cancer. Guidelines 2010 were updated based on systematic literature search performed by the sub-Comittee in Medline and PubMed databases to evaluate references, levels of evidence and grade of recommandation. Pathological examination of the tissue specimens was defined specifically for Gleason score according to ISP 2005 recommandations. Prostate and pelvis RMN became the reference in terms of radiological exam. Individual and early diagnosis of prostate cancer was defined and role of PSA was precised. Active surveillance became one of the standart of care of low-risk tumors, radical prostatectomy remained one of the options for all risk group tumors, length of hormonotherapy in association with radiotherapy was precised according to the risk group. Side effects of hormonotherapy treament needed specific supervision ; hormonotherapy had no indication in case of non metastatic tumors and intermittent hormonotherapy in metastatic tumors. New hormonal drugs in pre and post chemotherapy and bone target drugs opened new therapeutics pathways. From 2010 to 2013, standarts of care of prostate cancer were modified because of results of prospective studies and new therapeutics. They allowed precise treatments for each specific clinical situation. In the future, multidisciplinary treatments for high risk tumors, time of adjuvant treatment and sequencies of new hormonal treatment had to be defined.
    Progrès en Urologie 11/2013; 23 Suppl 2:S69-S101. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The analytical and clinical validation of new biomarkers for the early detection of prostate is necessary. (-2)proPSA, total PSA and free PSA values are used to calculate a standardized PHI index linked to a higher probability of a positive biopsy in patients with PSA levels between 3-4 and 10 ng/L, the gray zone for prostate cancer diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to validate the analytical performance of the (-2)proPSA and to determine the predictive value of PHI for the early detection of prostate cancer. Analytical performances are correct. It is not necessary to dilute samples before analysis. The stability of (-2)proPSA is good until at least 3 hours at room temperature before centrifugation. The study of the PSAT, PSAL, (-2)proPSA and PHI values in a population of patients consulting for an early prostate cancer diagnosis shows that the index PHI is the most powerful predictive marker of cancer with an area under ROC curve of 0.70, whereas it is only 0.56 for total PSA.
    Annales de biologie clinique. 10/2013; 71(5):537-544.
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether microarray analysis could find a molecular signature for pathologic staging and/or grading. Prospective multicentric study conducted from September 2007 to May 2008 (108 bladder tumours (45 pTa, 35 pT1 and 28> pT1). Microarray analysis was performed with Agilent Technologies Human Whole Genome 4 x 44K oligonucleotide microarrays and used a method of "dual colour" type versus a reference consisting of a pool of tumours. From the lists of genes provided by the BrB Class Comparison analyses, we validated the microarray results of 38 selected differentially expressed genes by RT-QPCR in another bladder tumour cohort (n = 95). The cluster "superficial vs invasive stage" properly classified 92.9% of invasive stages and 66.3% of superficial stages. Among the superficial tumours, the cluster analysis showed that pT1b tumours were closer to invasive stages than pT1a tumours. We also found molecular differences between low and high-grade superficial tumours. However these differences were less clear-cut than the one observed for staging. We confirm that the histopathological classification into subgroups pTa, pT1a and pT1b may have a translation in a "molecular signature" with a continuous progression of deregulation (overexpression or repression of these genes) from superficial (pTa) to more invasive (pT1a then b) stage.
    BJU International 07/2013; · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To assess the frequency, circumstances, and possible medico-legal consequences of the pT0 prostate cancer, defined by the absence of tumor in a radical prostatectomy specimen. Methods Six centers retrospectively identified all cases of pT0 and selectionned those that occurred without prior hormone therapy or prostate resection. Preoperative data, histological report and clinical and biological outcome were analyzed. The lawsuits’ registry in pathology were consulted at insurance companies. Results Thirty cases of pT0 prostate cancer (0.4%) were reported on 7693 patients. The median age was 63 years, PSA 7.4 ng/mL. The number of positive preoperative biopsies ranged from one to four for a median tumor length of 1 mm (0.3 to 18 mm). The biopsy Gleason score was 3 + 3 for 23 patients, less than 5 for six others and included a contingent of grade 4 in two patients. With a median follow-up of 82 months, no clinical or biochemical recurrence was observed. One patient complaint for pT0 prostate was found in the insurances registry. Conclusion The occurrence of a prostate pT0 called into question all the diagnostic procedures and surgical indication. To avoid a forensic procedure, urologists should inform patients of the possibility of this situation before radical prostatectomy.
    Progrès en Urologie 12/2012; 22(16):1021–1025. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Intravesical BCG immunotherapy and mitomycin C are considered as the standard treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. These guidelines aim to describe the optimal condition to perform intravesical instillation of BCG or mitomycin C in order to increase its oncologic efficiency and to decrease its morbidity. Methods Online systematic literature search was performed on PubMed® until April 2010. Regulation texts, published guidelines and results of recent urologists practice study were taken into consideration. Level of evidence was assigned to each recommendation. A bibliographic research in French and English using Medline® and Embase® with the keywords “BCG”, “mitomycin C”, “bladder”, “complication”, “toxicity”, “adverse reaction”, “prevention” and “treatment” was performed. Results Patient information must be prior to the first intravesical instillation and should be given through a medical exam by the physician performing the procedure. The check for formal contra-indication to BCG is systematically mandatory by the physician during the medical exam. Intravesical instillation must be realized in a health center where urologic endoscopic procedures are made frequently. A recent urine culture has to be checked systematically before any instillation done either by the urologist or a specialized nurse. Contingent upon a bladder catheter has been inserted in the bladder without any injury of the lower urinary tract, the instillation can be done. The pharmaceutical agent needs to be kept two hours in the bladder. After instillation, the patient must be seated to void and also has to keep in mind that he needs to drink at least 2 liters of water per day for 2 days. Conclusion To improve the oncologic performance and to reduce the risk of complication and adverse event, achievement of intravesical instillations of BCG and/or mitomycin C should follow a standardized procedure.
    Progrès en Urologie. 11/2012; 22(15):920–931.
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    ABSTRACT: Intravesical BCG immunotherapy and mitomycin C are considered as the standard treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. These guidelines aim to describe the optimal condition to perform intravesical instillation of BCG or mitomycin C in order to increase its oncologic efficiency and to decrease its morbidity. Online systematic literature search was performed on PubMed(®) until April 2010. Regulation texts, published guidelines and results of recent urologists practice study were taken into consideration. Level of evidence was assigned to each recommendation. A bibliographic research in French and English using Medline(®) and Embase(®) with the keywords "BCG", "mitomycin C", "bladder", "complication", "toxicity", "adverse reaction", "prevention" and "treatment" was performed. Patient information must be prior to the first intravesical instillation and should be given through a medical exam by the physician performing the procedure. The check for formal contra-indication to BCG is systematically mandatory by the physician during the medical exam. Intravesical instillation must be realized in a health center where urologic endoscopic procedures are made frequently. A recent urine culture has to be checked systematically before any instillation done either by the urologist or a specialized nurse. Contingent upon a bladder catheter has been inserted in the bladder without any injury of the lower urinary tract, the instillation can be done. The pharmaceutical agent needs to be kept two hours in the bladder. After instillation, the patient must be seated to void and also has to keep in mind that he needs to drink at least 2 liters of water per day for 2 days. To improve the oncologic performance and to reduce the risk of complication and adverse event, achievement of intravesical instillations of BCG and/or mitomycin C should follow a standardized procedure.
    Progrès en Urologie 11/2012; 22(15):920-31. · 0.80 Impact Factor
  • S. Fadli, X. Rébillard
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    ABSTRACT: The Cancer Program defines the terms of how to make a decision concerning diagnostic and therapeutic procedures based on the multidisciplinary meeting (MDM), the organization of the MDM provides Sheets that are filled out, at regular period of at least twice monthly and a basic quorum of providing a minimum of three different spécialities including a urologist and an oncologist, all cancer cases should be documented but does not necessary discussed in MDM, only nonconsensual management are discussed in MDM. The patient may not accept the management plan decision of MDM. The clinical follow-up after the MDM allows the delivery of personal care plan which summarizes the objectives and modalities of treatment.
    Progrès en Urologie - FMC 06/2012; 22(2):F52–F55.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite development and widespread of PSA, current tools evaluating prostate cancer still give inconsistent or insufficiently relevant results. As encouraging data raised from circulating tumor cells detection in colon or breast cancer, they were evaluated as a surrogate prostate cancer biomarker. Tumor cells need to leave their surrounding primary environment and to survive in mesenchymal environment before they spill and metastasize. Basic research revealed several mutations required through a complex transition phenomenon, including dormancy steps. Circulating cells detection techniques are based on molecular and immunologic methods. Most of them need an enrichment step to improve sensibility and/or specificity. As of today, Veridex' CellSearch(®) is the only FDA approved technique in the evaluation of castration resistant prostate cancer response to new drugs. Clinical research using other techniques highlighted the need for clinical endpoints, as there's no relevant tool and as techniques' target differ. Further studies are required to improve circulating tumors cells' staging and prognosis value. Cellular characterization may be the way to identify metastasis development potential more than the spillage burden. Those techniques still need improvements before they are included in daily practice decisional trees.
    Bulletin du cancer 05/2012; · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several trials evaluating the effect of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on prostate-cancer mortality have shown conflicting results. We updated prostate-cancer mortality in the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer with 2 additional years of follow-up. The study involved 182,160 men between the ages of 50 and 74 years at entry, with a predefined core age group of 162,388 men 55 to 69 years of age. The trial was conducted in eight European countries. Men who were randomly assigned to the screening group were offered PSA-based screening, whereas those in the control group were not offered such screening. The primary outcome was mortality from prostate cancer. After a median follow-up of 11 years in the core age group, the relative reduction in the risk of death from prostate cancer in the screening group was 21% (rate ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68 to 0.91; P=0.001), and 29% after adjustment for noncompliance. The absolute reduction in mortality in the screening group was 0.10 deaths per 1000 person-years or 1.07 deaths per 1000 men who underwent randomization. The rate ratio for death from prostate cancer during follow-up years 10 and 11 was 0.62 (95% CI, 0.45 to 0.85; P=0.003). To prevent one death from prostate cancer at 11 years of follow-up, 1055 men would need to be invited for screening and 37 cancers would need to be detected. There was no significant between-group difference in all-cause mortality. Analyses after 2 additional years of follow-up consolidated our previous finding that PSA-based screening significantly reduced mortality from prostate cancer but did not affect all-cause mortality. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN49127736.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 03/2012; 366(11):981-90. · 54.42 Impact Factor
  • J-L Moreau, X Rébillard, P Coloby
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    ABSTRACT: The physician's well-being at work is more and more evaluated, but so far few studies have concerned the specialty of urology. The objective of this survey CAPURO was to explore the quality of the professional life of French urologists, to get their position about on going reforms and information about their extra professional activities. The duration of this survey conducted in 2009 was one month with a questionnaire of 25 questions available at the AFU congress and on the Internet site www.cap-uro.com. Two hundred and ninety-six urologists have answered the questionnaire. More than two of three urologists declared being satisfied of their work, especially private urologists. The mean duration of weekly work was 57hours with much time spent for activities not directly related to the care of patients, but judged useful to develop quality of care and evaluation of practices. Ninety percent of urologists declared not to have an easy access to the new techniques and 60% of them were interested by clinical research, but most of them didn't have the necessary resources. They declared to be satisfied by the continuous medical training, but they affirmed lacking of help to get accreditation. Oncology, benign hyperplasias of prostate, lithiasis and endourology were the main urological specialities exercised by urologists. A majority of French urologists seemed to be very anxious about the future, mainly because of on going reforms. A few numbers of urologists had extra professional activities. In 2009, French urologists who participated in the survey CAPURO were mostly satisfied or very satisfied with their conditions of practice, but with some dissatisfaction justifying a real dialogue between health authorities and professionals.
    Progrès en Urologie 02/2012; 22(2):120-6. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. To assess the feasibility of salvage intensity-modulated radiation Therapy (IMRT) and to examine clinical outcome. Patients and Methods. 57 patients were treated with salvage IMRT to the prostate bed in our center from January, 2007, to February, 2010. The mean prescription dose was 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Forty-four patients received concomitant androgen deprivation. Results. Doses to organs at risk were low without altering target volume coverage. Salvage IMRT was feasible without any grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal or urinary toxicity. With a median follow-up of 21 months, one grade 2 urinary and 1 grade ≥2 rectal late toxicities were reported. Biological relapse-free survival was 96.5% (2.3% (1/44) relapsed with androgen suppression and 7.7% (1/13) without). Conclusion. Salvage IMRT is feasible and results in low acute and chronic side-effects. Longer follow-up is warranted to draw conclusions in terms of oncologic control.
    ISRN urology. 01/2012; 2012:391705.
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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is an important disease in terms of economic implications because of its increasing incidence and health care costs. We assessed the direct costs of the clinical management of prostate cancer in France. A retrospective study based on population-based data was carried out. Eight hundred and seventy-nine cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in five departments were included in a 5-year follow-up study. The economic analysis adopted the health-care payer's perspective and took into account only the direct costs. The mean cost of managing patients was estimated at euro12,731. It is composed of 49 to 82% of initial treatments according to the therapeutic strategy. The follow-up constituted between 3 and 11%, the costs of treatments for side effects between 1 and 3% and the travel cost between 3 and 7%. Cumulative total costs over 5 years for each treatment group showed variation in costs. Costs were highest for patients who were treated with external-beam radiotherapy and lowest for those with watchful waiting. The cost burden of prostate cancer is high and varies according to the treatment type. This study yielded a cost analysis of the different management practices of patients with prostate cancer.
    The European Journal of Health Economics 08/2011; 12(4):363-71. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the effect of predictive factors for oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) for high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 813 patients underwent RP for high-risk PCa in a national retrospective multi-institutional study. High-risk PCa was defined as follows: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level>20 ng/mL, Gleason score 8-10, and/or clinical Stage T2c-T4 disease. The preoperative criteria of high-risk PCa were studied in a logistic regression model to assess the correlations with the pathologic findings in the RP specimens. The predictive factors isolated or combined in scores were assessed by Cox multivariate and Kaplan-Meier analyses in predicting PSA failure (recurrence-free survival [RFS]) and overall survival (OS). The median follow-up was 64 months. Organ-confined disease was reported in 36.5%. The 5-year RFS, metastasis-free survival, and OS rate was 74.1%, 96.1%, and 98.6%, respectively. Each preoperative criteria of high-risk PCa was an independent predictor of PSA failure. The PSA failure risk was increased by 1.5- and 2.8-fold in men with 2 and 3 criteria, respectively. The RFS, but not the OS, was significantly different according to the preoperative score (P<.001). The postoperative score was significantly predictive for RFS and OS (P<.001 and P<.035, respectively). The risk of PSA failure was significantly increased with an increasing postoperative score (2-4.6-fold). National data support evidence that RP can result in encouraging midterm oncologic outcomes for the management of high-risk PCa. At 5 years after surgery, 75% of patients remain disease free. Our easy-to-use risk stratification might help clinicians to better predict the clinical and PSA outcomes of high-risk patients after surgery.
    Urology 07/2011; 78(3):607-13. · 2.42 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
268.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • Clinique Beau-Soleil
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
    • Hôpital Paris Saint Joseph
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2012
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Urology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2011
    • University of Lille Nord de France
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2010
    • Hôpital Cochin (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Centre)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Urology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005–2009
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Institut Bergonié
      Burdeos, Aquitaine, France
  • 2003
    • Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille
      • Urology Service
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France