Tobias Schumacher

University of Münster, Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (5)7.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of single-bundle (SB) and anatomic double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on the resulting knee kinematics in a simulated clinical setting with ACL rupture and associated extra-articular damage to the lateral structures. It was hypothesized that anatomic DB ACL reconstruction restores the intact knee kinematics in ACL/LCL-deficient knees, whereas SB ACL reconstruction fails to restore the intact knee kinematics. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaver knees were subjected to anterior tibial load of 134 N (simulated KT 1000) and combined rotatory load of 10-Nm valgus and 4-Nm internal tibial torque (simulated pivot shift) using a robotic/UFS testing system. The resulting knee kinematics was determined for intact, ACL/LCL-deficient, SB ACL-reconstructed/LCL-deficient, and DB ACL-reconstructed/LCL-deficient knee. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way ANOVA test with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. Under a simulated KT 1000 test, anterior tibial translation (ATT) following SB ACL reconstruction was statistically significant at 0 degrees , 30 degrees and 60 degrees of knee flexion when compared to the intact knee. ATT after DB ACL reconstruction showed no statistically significant difference from the intact knee; however, there was a significant difference in SB reconstruction at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. Under a simulated pivot shift test, both SB and DB ACL reconstruction failed to restore the intact knee kinematics. The results of the study did not support our initial hypothesis. Though DB reconstructions were significantly superior to SB reconstruction under simulated KT 1000 test, SB as well as DB reconstruction failed to restore the intact kinematics under simulated pivot shift loads. The clinical relevance of this study is that caution and precise preoperative diagnostics are needed to avoid failure of intra-articular ACL reconstruction if the extra-articular stabilizers are torn.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 03/2010; 130(8):1019-26. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, several publications investigated the rotational instability of the human knee joint under pivot shift examinations and reported the internal tibial rotation as measurement for instrumented knee laxity measurements. We hypothesize that ACL deficiency leads to increased internal tibial rotation under a simulated pivot shift test. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that anatomic single bundle ACL reconstruction significantly reduces the internal tibial rotation under a simulated pivot shift test when compared to the ACL-deficient knee. In seven human cadaveric knees, the kinematics of the intact knee, ACL-deficient knee, and anatomic single bundle ACL reconstructed knee were determined in response to a 134 N anterior tibial load and a combined rotatory load of 10 N m valgus and 4 N m internal tibial rotation using a robotic/UFS testing system. Statistical analyses were performed using a two-way ANOVA test. Single bundle ACL reconstruction reduced the anterior tibial translation under a simulated KT-1000 test significantly compared to the ACL-deficient knee (P < 0.05). After reconstruction, there was a statistical significant difference to the intact knee at 30 degrees of knee flexion. Under a simulated pivot shift test, anatomic single bundle ACL reconstruction could restore the intact knee kinematics. Internal tibial rotation under a simulated pivot shift showed no significant difference in the ACL-intact, ACL-deficient and ACL-reconstructed knee. In conclusion, ACL deficiency does not increase the internal tibial rotation under a simulated pivot shift test. For objective measurements of the rotational instability of the knee using instrumented knee laxity devices under pivot shift mechanisms, the anterior tibial translation should be rather evaluated than the internal tibial rotation.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 08/2008; 129(3):353-8. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have suggested that double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may restore intact knee kinematics better than single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Although the tunnel position of the femoral anteromedial bundle is well established, the effects of different posterolateral bundle positions on knee kinematics are unknown. Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an anatomical (shallow) femoral posterolateral bundle tunnel placement will restore knee kinematics more closely than will a nonanatomical (deep) femoral posterolateral bundle tunnel position. Controlled laboratory study. In 12 human cadaveric knees, the kinematics of the intact knee, anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee, and double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knees with nonanatomical femoral posterolateral tunnel placement and anatomical posterolateral bundle placement were determined in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load and a combined rotatory load of 10 N x m valgus and 4 N x m internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Statistical analyses were performed using a 2-way analysis of variance test. Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with nonanatomical posterolateral bundle placement showed significantly higher anterior tibial translation under anterior tibial and combined rotatory load than did the intact knee at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion (P < .05). Reconstruction with an anatomical posterolateral tunnel placement restored the intact knee kinematics and showed significantly lower anterior tibial translation under anterior tibial and combined rotatory load when compared with reconstruction with nonanatomical posterolateral placement (P < .05). Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the anatomical posterolateral bundle tunnel position restores the intact knee kinematics. A nonanatomical posterolateral bundle position results in rotatory instability. Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be performed using anatomical tunnel placement of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles. Nonanatomical double-bundle reconstruction may fail to show any clinical superiority to single-bundle reconstruction and should be avoided.
    The American journal of sports medicine 04/2008; 36(4):678-85. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the anterolateral rotational instability (ALRI) of the human knee after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and after additional injury of the different components of the posterolateral structures (PLS). It was hypothesized that a transsection of the ACL will significantly increase the ALRI of the knee and furthermore that sectioning the PLS [lateral collateral ligament (LCL), popliteus complex (PC)] will additionally significantly increase the ALRI. Five human cadaveric knees were used for dissection to study the appearance and behaviour of the structures of the posterolateral corner under anterior tibial load. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaver knees were subjected to anterior tibial load of 134 N and combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial torque using a robotic/universal force moment sensor (UFS) testing system and the resulting knee kinematics were determined for intact, ACL-, LCL- and PC-deficient (popliteus tendon and popliteofibular ligament) knee. Statistical analyses were performed using a two-way ANOVA test with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. Sectioning the ACL significantly increased the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and internal tibial rotation under a combined rotatory load at 0 and 30 degrees flexion (P < 0.05). Sectioning the LCL further increased the ALRI significantly at 0 degrees , 30 degrees and 60 degrees of flexion (P < 0.05). Subsequent cutting of the PC increased the ATT under anterior tibial load (P < 0.05), but did not increase the ALRI (P > 0.05). The results of the current study confirm the concept that the rupture of the ACL is associated with ALRI. Current reconstruction techniques should focus on restoring the anterolateral rotational knee instability to the intact knee. Additional injury to the LCL further increases the anterior rotational instability significantly, while the PC is less important. Cautions should be taken when examining a patient with ACL rupture to diagnose injuries to the primary restraints of tibial rotation such as the LCL. If an additional extraarticular stabilisation technique is needed for severe ALRI, the technique should be able to restore the function of the LCL and not the PC.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 11/2007; 127(9):743-52. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the anterolateral rotational instability (ALRI) of the human knee after rupture of the anterior cruciate liga-ment (ACL) and after additional injury of the diVerent components of the posterolateral structures (PLS). It was hypothesized that a transsection of the ACL will signiWcantly increase the ALRI of the knee and furthermore that sectioning the PLS [lateral collateral ligament (LCL), popliteus complex (PC)] will addi-tionally signiWcantly increase the ALRI. Materials and methods Five human cadaveric knees were used for dissection to study the appearance and behaviour of the structures of the posterolateral corner under anterior tibial load. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaver knees were subjected to anterior tibial load of 134 N and combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial torque using a robotic/universal force moment sensor (UFS) testing system and the resulting knee kinematics were determined for intact, ACL-, LCL-and PC-deWcient (popliteus tendon and popliteoWbular ligament) knee. Statistical analyses were performed using a two-way ANOVA test with the level of signiWcance set at P < 0.05. Results Sectioning the ACL signiWcantly increased the anterior tibial translation (ATT) and internal tibial rotation under a combined rotatory load at 0 and 30° Xexion (P < 0.05). Sectioning the LCL further increased the ALRI signiWcantly at 0°, 30° and 60° of Xexion (P < 0.05). Subsequent cutting of the PC increased the ATT under anterior tibial load (P < 0.05), but did not increase the ALRI (P > 0.05). Conclusion The results of the current study conWrm the concept that the rupture of the ACL is associated with ALRI. Current reconstruction techniques should focus on restoring the anterolateral rotational knee instability to the intact knee. Additional injury to the LCL further increases the anterior rotational instabil-ity signiWcantly, while the PC is less important. Cau-tions should be taken when examining a patient with ACL rupture to diagnose injuries to the primary restraints of tibial rotation such as the LCL. If an addi-tional extraarticular stabilisation technique is needed for severe ALRI, the technique should be able to restore the function of the LCL and not the PC.

Publication Stats

157 Citations
7.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2010
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Trauma, Hand, and Reconstructive Surgery
      Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany