Liang-Wan Chen

Fujian Medical University, Min-hou, Fujian, China

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Publications (37)86.29 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To discuss the feasibility and experience of treating valvular heart diseases with thoracoscopy-assisted mitral valve replacement concomitant with tricuspid valvuloplasty, with domestically manufactured pipeline products for cardiopulmonary bypass.MethodsA total of 135 patients with valvular heart disease were admitted to our hospital between January 2011 and January 2013. They received thoracoscopy-assisted mitral valve replacement concomitant with tricuspid valvuloplasty, with domestically manufactured pipeline products. A cardiopulmonary bypass with domestically-manufactured pipeline products was established during the surgery. The procedure was accomplished with the assistance of thoracoscopy through a small incision in the right chest wall.ResultsAll 135 patients underwent a successful surgery, and were followed up for the duration of half a year to two years. None of them displayed any evidence of complications. Our procedure had the advantage of fewer complications and a significantly shortened time period for the patient care and hospitalization. As opposed to imported pipeline products for cardiopulmonary bypass, our procedure had the advantage of similar clinical results at a lower cost.Conclusions Thoracoscopy-assisted mitral valve replacement concomitant with tricuspid valvuloplasty was proved to be a safe and effective method for cardiopulmonary bypass, with the use of domestically manufactured pipeline products.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 10/2014; 9(1):160. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate whether the α agonist dexmedetomidine has the ability to attenuate hypoxemia in pediatric patients undergoing palliative pulmonary artery reconstruction.From January 2009 to January 2013, a total of 25 pediatric patients with Tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia (ventricular septal defect), or persistent truncus arteriosus (I) were enrolled in our study. Due to hypoplastic pulmonary arteries, all patients received palliative pulmonary artery reconstruction. During the perioperative period, they were allocated to receive either dexmedetomidine (bolus dose of 0.3 μg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.2-0.3 μg/kg/h, n = 15) or control drug (n = 10) intravenously. Any desaturation was recorded. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse oximetry, and arterial blood gas parameters were measured during the perioperative period.There were no significant differences between the groups in hemodynamic variables. The arterial oxygen saturation and arterial blood gas parameters increased in the dexmedetomidine groups (P < 0.05).These findings suggest that the injection of dexmedetomidine can attenuate hypoxemia during palliative pulmonary artery reconstruction in pediatric patients.
    Medicine. 09/2014; 93(13):e69.
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    ABSTRACT: Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication in infants who undergo cardiac surgery in the intensive care unit. We report on a modified drainage catheter used in peritoneal dialysis (PD) for the treatment of ARF associated with cardiac surgery in infants.Thirty-nine infants with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery who developed ARF at our center between January 2009 and January 2012 were assessed. A modified drainage catheter for PD was used in these infants. Their demographic, clinical, and surgical data were analyzed.Thirty infants with ARF were cured by PD, and the other 9 died in the first 48 hours because of the severity of the acute cardiac dysfunction. All these infants were dependent upon mechanical ventilation during the postoperative period and used vasoactive drugs. In the survival group, the interval between the procedure and initiation of PD was 13.6 ± 6.5 (range, 6-30) hours. PD duration was 3.9 ± 0.9 (3-6) days. Minor complications were encountered in some patients (asymptomatic hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, and thrombocytopenia). These complications were readily treated by drugs or resolved spontaneously. Hemodynamics, cardiac function, and renal function improved significantly during PD.These data suggest that PD using a modified drainage catheter for ARF after cardiac surgery in infants is safe, feasible, inexpensive, and yields good results.
    Medicine. 09/2014; 93(14):e77.
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    ABSTRACT: Background In total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft for acute type A aortic dissection, the diameters of the native arch vessels and the distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels did not always match the available sizes of the triple-branched stent grafts, and insertion of the triple-branched stent graft through the distal ascending aortic incision was not easy in some cases. To reduce those two problems, we modified the triple-branched stent graft and developed the arch open technique.Methods and resultsTotal arch repair with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique was performed in 25 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection. There was 1 surgical death. Most survivors had an uneventful postoperative course. All implanted stents were in a good position and wide expansion, there was no space or blood flow surrounding the stent graft. Complete thrombus obliteration of the false lumen was found around the modified triple-branched stent graft in all survivors and at the diaphragmatic level in 20 of 24 patients.Conclusions The modified triple-branched stent graft could provide a good match with the different diameters of the native arch vessels and the various distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels, and it¿s placement could become much easier by the arch open technique. Consequently, placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft could be easily used in most patients with acute type A aortic dissection for effective total arch repair.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 08/2014; 9(1):135. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To summarize the clinical experiences and midterm follow-up results of total arch repair with open triple-branched stent graft placement for acute type A aortic dissection. From June 2008 to March 2013, 122 patients (95 men and 27 women; mean age, 50.9 ± 10.4 years) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and selective cerebral perfusion. During the follow-up period, enhanced computed tomography and echocardiography were performed at 3 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Placement of the triple-branched stent graft into the true lumen of the descending aorta, arch, and 3 arch vessels was technically successful in 121 patients. The cardiopulmonary bypass time was 186.50 ± 38.23 minutes, and the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion time was 31.97 ± 10.08 minutes. The in-hospital mortality was 4.93%. No permanent neurologic dysfunction or paraplegia was observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up period was 30.24 ± 12.35 months. After hospital discharge, 3 patients died. On the 3-month postoperative scans, complete thrombus formation around the triple-branched stent graft was observed in 89.38% of the patients. Endoleaks were detected in 12 patients; 8 patients refused any management for the endoleaks, but they maintained a good quality of life. The other 4 patients were successfully treated by additional surgery. Total arch repair with open triple-branched stent graft placement is an effective technique with satisfactory early and midterm results. This technique could be an attractive alternative to conventional total arch replacement.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 11/2013; · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • Liang-Wan Chen, Xiao-Fu Dai, Xi-Jie Wu, Gui-Can Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: We describe an alternative valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique for patients with root aneurysms accompanied by aortic valve insufficiency. Aortic root reduction plasty was accomplished by plication and exclusion of parts of the sinus walls. Subsequently, 3 teardrop-shaped patches compatible with the sizes and shapes of the corresponding plicated sinuses were sutured inside the sinuses as neointima, and in situ coronary buttons were connected to the small holes created in the corresponding patches. A Dacron tube graft was then anastomosed to the reconstructed aortic root with incorporation of the distal margin of the implanted patches. Our initial application showed that this combined root reduction plasty and patch neointima placement is a feasible valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique. This combined technique easily restores the aortic root geometry and effectively prevents bleeding.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 04/2013; 95(4):1459-61. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This was a study to evaluate the safety and feasibility of balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the right ventricle (RV) for the treatment of pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum (PA-IVS). METHODS: Ten neonates with PA-IVS, who underwent balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the RV at our institution from January 2008 to May 2010, were enrolled in this study. The oxygen saturation range was 60% to 83% (median 76%). The Z-value range of the tricuspid valve annulus was -2 to 2 (median 0.15), the diameter range of the pulmonary valve annulus was 4.6 to 8.6 mm (median 7.3), and the RV systolic pressure range was 88 to 124 mm Hg (median 106.5). A guidewire was used to perforate the pulmonary valve through the RV, followed by balloon dilation of the valve. The procedure was guided by transesophageal echocardiography. RESULTS: The procedure was carried out successfully in all patients. The procedure time ranged from 64 to 110 minutes (median 82.5). Mechanical ventilation time ranged from 8 to 36 hours (median 11), and hospital stay ranged from 7 to 13 days (median 9). After the procedure, the median oxygen saturation increased to 89.5%, the median RV systolic pressure decreased to 45 mm Hg, and the gradient across the pulmonary valve ranged from 20 to 45 mm Hg (median 27.5). Minor complications included transient supraventricular tachycardia (n = 1), blood loss requiring transfusion (n = 2), moderate pulmonary regurgitation (n = 1), and mild pulmonary regurgitation (n = 3). There were no cases of cardiac perforation, main pulmonary artery aneurysm, or low output syndrome. Follow-up of patients ranged from 8 to 15 months (median 12.3). All patients remained clinically well. CONCLUSIONS: Balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the RV is a safe and feasible alternative to surgical valvotomy or percutaneous balloon dilation. Early results are encouraging.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 03/2013; · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A hybrid approach to minimally invasive perventricular closure of VSD in infants is safe and effective, and has been performed under guidance of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We applied transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) guidance to this hybrid approach, and compare results guided by TTE with those by TEE. METHODS: From January 2011 to January 2012, 71 infants with VSD were enrolled to undergo a minimally invasive device closure. After evaluation of VSD by TTE, either TEE or TTE was used to guide the minimally invasive device closure. 30 patients had TEE guidance, and 41 patients had TTE. All patients were followed for 3 months after the operation. RESULTS: The TEE group had a success rate of 93.3% (28/30) for device implantation, compared with 92.7% (38/41) in the TTE group. Two patients in the TEE group turned to surgical closure, one for involvement of the inlet area of VSD demonstrated by TEE, another for moderate aortic regurgitation after device implantation. Two patients in the TTE group also transferred to surgical closure, one for residual shunt, another for failure of the floppy wire across the defect. In addition, one patient in the TTE group experienced dropout of the occluder one day postoperatively. At 3-month follow-up, one patient had mild aortic regurgitation in the TEE group and in two patients in the TTE group. There were no episodes of cardiac block, thromboembolism, or device displacement in either group. CONCLUSIONS: TTE-guided VSD closure is feasible in infants, with results similar to those of TEE guidance, although caution is advisable.
    Cardiovascular Ultrasound 03/2013; 11(1):8. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • Liang-Wan Chen, Xi-Jie Wu, Qian-Zhen Li, Xiao-Fu Dai
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a modified valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique for acute type A aortic dissection. After the normal root geometry was restored by removing blood and clots in the proximal false lumen and the valve insufficiency was corrected by simple resuspension of the aortic commissures, three teardrop-shaped patches were sutured inside the sinuses as neointima and then in situ coronary buttons were connected to the small holes created in the corresponding patches. Our initial application showed that this modified valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique is an easy and effective way to restore the geometry of the aortic root and avoid bleeding during surgery for acute type A dissection.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 06/2012; 42(4):731-3. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives This study aims at assessing the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of the perimembranous ventricular septal defect (VSD).Methods Total 89 patients in group I with intraoperative device closure and 58 in group II with surgical repair were enrolled in our hospital to participate in the study from January 2009 to December 2010. In group I, the approach involved a minimal inferior median incision that was performed after full evaluation of the perimembranous VSD by real-time transesophageal echocardiographic guidance, and the insertion of an asymmetric or a symmetric domestically made device was used to occlude the perimembranous VSD.Results In group I, 83 patients were occluded successfully under this approach. The size of the occluder implanted ranged from 6 to 14 mm. Complete atrioventricular block occurred in one case and Mobitz type II atrioventricular block occurred in one case during the procedure. One patient presented complete atrioventricular block one week after the operation. Two patients converted to surgical repair because of severe intraoperative aortic valve regurgitation. One patient with significant residual shunt transformed to surgical treatment. In our comparative studies, patients in group II experienced significantly longer operative time, ICU stay, and hospital stay (p < 0.001). The cost of group I was less than that of group II (p < 0.001).Conclusions Minimally invasive transthoracic device closure of the perimembranous VSD with an asymmetric or a symmetric domestically made device without cardiopulmonary bypass is safe and feasible. It should be considered an acceptable alternative to surgery in selected subgroups. However, it is necessary to evaluate the long-term results.
    The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon 06/2012; · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional surgical closure has been considered the gold standard for the treatment of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (PVSDs) in infants for many years, but it requires a cardiopulmonary bypass and midline sternotomy which can lead to both physical and psychological trauma in the future. An intraoperative device closure can be performed with the advantages of reduced invasion, faster recovery and so on. We evaluate the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of PVSDs in infants in comparison with surgical closure. One hundred eighty-six infants with a PVSD were enrolled in our study. Among them, 97 patients were treated by surgical closure and 89 were treated by intraoperative device closure. The success rates, complications, length of hospital stay and costs were measured. The success rate was similar (P = 0.228) in the two groups: 87/89 patients (97.8%) in the device group versus 97/97 patients (100%) in the surgical group. Complication needs management was required in one patient of the device group (1.1%) and in two patients of the surgical group (2.0%) (P = 1.000). Minor complications were observed in 7/87 patients (8.0%) of the device group versus 15/99 patients (15.2%) of the surgical group (P < 0.001). Both groups were similarly effective in reducing the left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiothoracic rate. The procedure time, inpatient stay and intensive care unit stay are shorter in the device group; the total cost was similar for both groups. Intraoperative device closure of PVSDs under real-time transoesophageal echocardiography guidance is safe and feasible without CPB. Under the right conditions, intraoperative device closure can be a good alternative to surgical closure for the treatment of PVSDs in infants.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 05/2012; 42(5):800-5. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atrioventricular block (AVB) is a well-reported complication after closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (VSDs). To report the occurrence of AVB either during or following closure of perimembranous VSDs using a novel "hybrid" method involving a minimal inferior median incision and of intraoperative device closure of the perimembranous VSDs. Between January 2009 and January 2011, patients diagnosed with perimembranous VSDs eligible for intraoperative device closure with a domestic occluder were identified. All patients were assessed by real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and electrocardiography. Of the 97 included patients, 94 were successfully occluded using this approach. Complete AVB occurred in only one case and one case of Mobitz type II AVB was diagnosed intraoperatively. In both patients, the procedure was aborted and the AVBs quickly resolved. Glucocorticosteroids were administered to another two patients who developed Mobitz type II AVB intraoperatively. Those two patients converted to Mobitz type I AVB 3 days and 5 days postsurgically. During the follow-up period (range, 6-24 months), one patient developed complete AVB 1 week following device insertion. Surgical device removal was followed by a rapid and complete recovery of atrioventricular conduction. Intraoperative device closure of perimembranous VSDs with a domestic occluder resulted in excellent closure rates; however, AVB is a serious complication that can occur either during or any time after device closure of perimembranous VSDs. The technique described herein may reduce the incidence of perioperative AVB complications. Surgeons are encouraged to closely monitor all patients postsurgically to ensure AVB does not occur in their patients. Additional long-term data to better identify the prevalence and risk factors for AVB in treated patients are needed.
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 03/2012; 12:21. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our purpose was to investigate the feasibility of transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) guidance for minimally invasive periventricular device closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (VSDs). From June 2011 to September 2011, we enrolled 18 young children with perimembranous VSDs to receive minimally invasive device closure in our hospital. All of the patients were examined by TTE to determine the VSD morphology, diameter, and rims. During intra-operative device closure, real-time bedside TTE alone was used to guide device implantation. Device implantation using TTE guidance was successful in 16 patients. Symmetric devices were used in 14 patients, and asymmetric devices were used in 2 patients. Only one patient experienced mild aortic regurgitation, and there were no instances of residual shunt, significant arrhythmias, thromboembolism, or device displacement. Two patients were transferred to surgical closure, one due to residual shunting and the other as a result of unsuccessful wire penetration of the VSD gap. Our data indicate that TTE-guided VSD closure is feasible in young children, although a longer follow-up may be needed to document the long-term success.
    European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging. 02/2012; 13(9):739-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Atrioventricular block (AVB) is a infrequent and serious complication after percutaneous ASD closure. In this study, we report on the incidence of AVB associated with intraoperative device closure of the ASD with transthoracic minimal invasion, and the outcomes of this complication in our center. Between May 2006 and January 2011, a total of 213 secundum-type ASD patients were accepted in our hospital for intraoperative and transthoracic device closure with a domestic occluder. All patients were assessed by real-time transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and electrocardiograph (ECG). All patients were occluded successfully under this approach. Immediate postprocedure third-degree AVB was observed in two patients. Since heart rates were in the range of about 50 to 55 beats per minute, no intervention was needed except for close observation for one patient. Another patient who recovered sinus rhythm intermittently during the operation was fitted with a temporary pacemaker. Approximately one week following glucocorticoid treatment, the AVB resolved spontaneously in these two patients. Mobitz type II AVB occurred in three patients during the procedure. Two patients developed post-operative cardiac arrest and were rescued successfully with cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One other patient changed to Mobitz type I AVB after three days. During the follow-up period, which ranged from six months to five years, no further occurrence of AVB was found. Intraoperative and transthoracic device closure of secundum ASDs with domestic occluder resulted in excellent closure rate. AVB is an infrequent but serious complication during and after device closure of a secundum ASD. AVB is a complication that warrants greater attention and long-term follow-up.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(12):e52726. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (VSD) in young children guided by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We enrolled 18 patients from our hospital to participate in the study from June 2011 to September 2011. A minimal inferior median incision was performed after full evaluation of the perimembranous VSD by real-time TTE, and a domestically made device was inserted to occlude the perimembranous VSD. The proper size of the device was determined by means of transthoracic echocardiographic analysis. Implantation was ultimately successful in 16 patients using TTE guidance. In these cases, the complete closure rate immediately following the operation and on subsequent follow-up was 100%. Symmetric devices were used in 14 patients, and asymmetric devices were used in two patients. Two patient were transformed to surgical treatment, one for significant residual shunting, and the other for unsuccessful wire penetration of the VSD. The follow-up periods were less than nine months, and only one patient had mild aortic regurgitation. There were no instances of residual shunt, noticeable aortic regurgitation, significant arrhythmia, thrombosis, or device failure. Minimally invasive transthoracic device closure of perimembranous VSDs is safe and feasible, using a domestically made device under transthoracic echocardiographic guidance, without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. This technique should be considered an acceptable alternative to surgery or device closure guided by transesophageal echocardiography in selected young children. However, a long-term evaluation of outcomes is necessary.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 12/2011; 6:166. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the feasibility of open single-branched stent graft placement for simplified total arch replacement in acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Between June 2008 and September 2009, 23 patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissection underwent total arch replacement plus open single-branched stent graft placement. When core nasopharyngeal temperature dropped to 68 H, the perfusion to lower body was discontinued. Left common carotid artery was transected at its ostium and its proximal stump closed. The arch was transected at a predetermined line between innominate artery and left common carotid artery. Through a transverse incision, the main stent graft of single-branched stent graft was inserted into true lumen of descending aorta. And the side arm stent graft was positioned into left subclavian artery. The transected stump of arch was reconstructed by inner proximal stent-free Dacron tube of main graft and outer Teflon felt. Subsequently continuous anastomosis was made to a 3-branched Dacron tube graft. Open single-branched stent graft placement was technically successful in all patients. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, lower body arrest time and selective cerebral perfusion time were (161 ± 32), (97 ± 20), (21 ± 4) and (31 ± 6) min respectively. All patients were discharged from hospital without any complication. Their computed tomographic scans at 3 months postoperatively showed that all stent grafts were fully opened and not kinked. There was neither space nor blood flow surrounding the single-branched stent graft. The false lumen of descending aorta around stent graft closed with thrombus in all cases. Open single-branched stent graft placement is a new effective technique for simplified total arch replacement in acute type A aortic dissection. With this technique, the left subclavian artery anastomosis and distal aortic anastomosis at descending aorta can be avoided.
    Zhonghua yi xue za zhi 12/2011; 91(48):3435-7.
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to prove the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) with transthoracic minimal invasion in the older patients. From January 2006 to December 2009, 47 patients aged 50 years or more and suffered from atrial septal defect were enrolled in our institution. Patients were divided into two groups, 27 of which in group I with intraoperative device closure and the other 20 in group II with surgical closure. In group I, the method involved a minimal intercostal incision, which was performed after full evaluation of the atrial septal defect by transthoracic echocardiography, and the insertion of the device through the delivery sheath to occlude the atrial septal defect. In group I, implantation was ultimately successful in all patients. The complete closure rate at 24 hours and 1 year were 81.5% and 100% respectively. In 6 of 27 patients, minor complications occurred: transient arrhythmia (n = 5) and blood transfusion (n = 3). In group II, all patients were closured successfully; almost all of them needed blood transfusion and suffered from various minor complications though. During a follow-up period of 1 to 5 years, no residual shunt, noticeable mitral regurgitation, significant arrhythmias, thrombosis, or device failure were found. In our comparative studies, group II had significantly longer ICU stay and hospital stay than group I (p < 0.05). The cost of group I was less than that of group II(p < 0.05). Minimally invasive transthoracic device closure of the atrial septal defect at advanced age with a domestically made device without cardiopulmonary bypass is safe and feasible under transthoracic echocardiographic guidance. It was cost-savings, yielding better cosmetic results and leaving fewer traumas than surgical closure. Early and mid-term results are encouraging. However, it is necessary to evaluate the long-term results.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 09/2011; 6:123. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In total arch replacement for patients with acute type A aortic dissection, anastomoses of the graft to the left subclavian artery and descending aorta are often difficult, and the arch vessel anastomosis is frequently performed at the site of dissection. To make this procedure easier and safer, we developed 2 modified techniques: open single-branched stent graft placement into the left subclavian artery and the descending aorta and reinforcement of the dissected arch vessel stump with a stent graft neointima. The feasibility and initial clinical results of these 2 new techniques are reported. Total arch repair with the 2 new techniques was performed in 26 patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Most patients had an uneventful postoperative course, and there were no surgical deaths. All implanted stent grafts were fully opened and not kinked, and there was no space or blood flow surrounding any of the stent grafts. The false lumen of the descending thoracic aorta closed with thrombus formation in 22 of 26 patients. Disappearance of the false lumen and recovery of the true lumen was observed in all of the dissected arch vessels. Open single-branched stent graft placement into the left subclavian artery and the descending aorta and reinforcement of the dissected arch vessel stump with a stent graft neointima are 2 simple and effective techniques that should make total arch repair an easier and safer procedure for acute type A aortic dissection.
    Circulation 06/2011; 123(22):2536-41. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study aims to evaluate the safety and feasibility of intra-operative device closure of atrial septal defect with transthoracic minimal invasion. From May 2006 to June 2009, 252 patients with secundum-type atrial septal defect closure were enrolled in our institution. The patients were divided into two groups, with 182 patients in group I with intra-operative device closure and 72 in group II with surgical closure. In group I, the patients' age ranged from 3 months to 62 years (mean±standard deviation, 19.0±16.7 years). This approach involved a transthoracic minimal invasion that was performed after full evaluation of the atrial septal defect by transthoracic echocardiography, deploying the device through the delivery sheath to occlude the atrial septal defect. In group I, 180 patients were occluded successfully under this approach. The size of the occluder device implanted ranged from 6 to 48 mm. Minor complications occurred, which included transient arrhythmias (n=23) and pleural effusion (n=15). Two patients with postoperative cardiac arrest were successfully cardiopulmonary resuscitated. Another two patients with occluder dislodged back into the right atrium were turned to surgical repair with cardiopulmonary bypass on the postoperative day. In group II, all patients were occluded successfully, and almost all patients needed blood transfusion and suffered from various minor complications. All discharged patients were followed up for 1-5 years. During this period, we found no recurrence, no thrombosis, even no device failure. In our comparative studies, group II had significantly longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay and hospital stay than group I (p<0.05). The cost for group I was less than group II (p<0.05). Intra-operative device closure of atrial septal defect with transthoracic minimal invasion is a safe and feasible technique. It had the advantages of cost savings, yielding better cosmetic results, and leaving less trauma than surgical closure.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 05/2011; 41(1):121-5. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of atrial septal defects with inferior vena cava rim deficiency. From January 2005 to December 2008, we enrolled 65 patients who had a secundum atrial septal defect with inferior vena cava rim deficiency closure in our institution. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 35 patients in group I underwent intraoperative device closure with a right lateral minithoracotomy and 30 in group II underwent open cardiac repair with a right lateral thoracotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. Intraoperative device closure involved a minimal intercostal incision that was performed after full evaluation of the atrial septal defect by transthoracic echocardiography and the insertion of the device through the delivery sheath to occlude the atrial septal defect. The procedure was successful in all patients. In group I, the diameter of the atrial septal defect ranged from 30 to 44 mm (mean, 35.3 ± 3.9 mm), and the size of the implanted occluder ranged from 34 to 48 mm (mean, 40 ± 2.1 mm). The total occlusion rate was 82.9% immediately after the operation, 97.1% at 3 months, and 100% at 12 and 24 months of follow-up. In group II, all patients had successful closure. A follow-up period of 12 to 24 months was obtained in both groups. During the follow-up, there was no recurrence, thrombosis, or device failure. In our comparative studies, group II had significantly longer operative time, intensive care unit stay, and hospital stay than group I (P < .001). The cost of group I was less than that of group II (20,450.9 ± 840.8 RMB vs 25,884.9 ± 701.8; P < .001). Intraoperative device closure of atrial septal defects with inferior vena cava rim deficiency is a safe and feasible technique. It has the advantages of cost savings, cosmetic results, and less trauma than surgical closure. Early and midterm results are encouraging.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 03/2011; 141(3):631-6. · 3.41 Impact Factor