Thomas F Gajewski

University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (186)1229.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Uveal melanoma is characterized by mutations in GNAQ and GNA11, resulting in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 06/2014; 311(23):2397-405. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antibodies (Abs) that preferentially target oncogenic receptors have been increasingly used for cancer therapy, but tumors often acquire intrinsic Ab resistance after prolonged and costly treatment. Herein we armed the Ab with IFNβ and observed that it is more potent than the first generation of Ab for controlling Ab-resistant tumors. This strategy controls Ab resistance by rebridging suppressed innate and adaptive immunity in the tumor microenvironment. Mechanistically, Ab-IFNβ therapy primarily and directly targets intratumoral dendritic cells, which reactivate CTL by increasing antigen cross-presentation within the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, blocking PD-L1, which is induced by Ab-IFNβ treatment, overcomes treatment-acquired resistance and completely eradicates established tumors. This study establishes a next-generation Ab-based immunotherapy that targets and eradicates established Ab-resistant tumors.
    Cancer cell 01/2014; 25(1):37-48. · 25.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blockade of immune inhibitory pathways is emerging as an important therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Single agent treatments have partial anti-tumor activity in preclinical models and in human cancer patients. Inasmuch as the tumor microenvironment shows evidence of multiple immune inhibitory mechanisms present concurrently, it has been reasoned that combination therapies may be required for optimal therapeutic effect. To test this notion, we utilized permutations of anti-CTLA-4 mAb, anti-PD-L1 mAb, and/or the IDO inhibitor INCB23843 in the murine B16.SIY melanoma model. All three combinations showed markedly improved tumor control over single treatments, with many mice achieving complete tumor rejection. This effect was seen in the absence of vaccination or adoptive T cell therapy. The mechanism of synergy was investigated to examine the priming versus effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response. Only a minimal increase in priming of anti-tumor T cells was observed at early time points in the tumor-draining lymph nodes (TdLN). In contrast, as early as three days after therapy initiation, a marked increase in the capacity of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells to produce IL-2 and to proliferate was found in all groups treated with the effective combinations. Treatment of mice with FTY720 to block new T cell trafficking from secondary lymphoid structures still enabled restoration of IL-2 production and proliferation by intratumoral T cells, and also retained most of the tumor growth control. Our data suggest that the therapeutic effect of these immunotherapies was mainly mediated through direct reactivation of T cells in situ. These three combinations are attractive to pursue clinically, and the ability of intratumoral CD8(+) T cells to produce IL-2 and to proliferate could be an important biomarker to integrate into clinical studies.
    Journal for immunotherapy of cancer. 01/2014; 2:3.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Addition of a MEK inhibitor to a BRAF inhibitor enhances tumour growth inhibition, delays acquired resistance, and abrogates paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway in preclinical models of BRAF-mutated melanoma. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combined BRAF inhibition with vemurafenib and MEK inhibition with cobimetinib in patients with advanced BRAF-mutated melanoma. Methods We undertook a phase 1b study in patients with advanced BRAFV600-mutated melanoma. We included individuals who had either recently progressed on vemurafenib or never received a BRAF inhibitor. In the dose-escalation phase of our study, patients received vemurafenib 720 mg or 960 mg twice a day continuously and cobimetinib 60 mg, 80 mg, or 100 mg once a day for either 14 days on and 14 days off (14/14), 21 days on and 7 days off (21/7), or continuously (28/0). The primary endpoint was safety of the drug combination and to identify dose-limiting toxic effects and the maximum tolerated dose. Efficacy was a key secondary endpoint. All patients treated with vemurafenib and cobimetinib were included in safety and efficacy analyses (intention-to-treat). The study completed accrual and all analyses are final. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01271803. Findings 129 patients were treated at ten dosing regimens combining vemurafenib and cobimetinib: 66 had recently progressed on vemurafenib and 63 had never received a BRAF inhibitor. Dose-limiting toxic effects arose in four patients. One patient on a schedule of vemurafenib 960 mg twice a day and cobimetinib 80 mg once a day 14/14 had grade 3 fatigue for more than 7 days; one patient on a schedule of vemurafenib 960 mg twice a day and cobimetinib 60 mg once a day 21/7 had a grade 3 prolongation of QTc; and two patients on a schedule of vemurafenib 960 mg twice a day and cobimetinib 60 mg 28/0 had dose-limiting toxic effects—one developed grade 3 stomatitis and fatigue and one developed arthralgia and myalgia. The maximum tolerated dose was established as vemurafenib 960 mg twice a day in combination with cobimetinib 60 mg 21/7. Across all dosing regimens, the most common adverse events were diarrhoea (83 patients, 64%), non-acneiform rash (77 patients, 60%), liver enzyme abnormalities (64 patients, 50%), fatigue (62 patients, 48%), nausea (58 patients, 45%), and photosensitivity (52 patients, 40%). Most adverse events were mild-to-moderate in severity. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma (12 patients, 9%; all grade 3), raised amounts of alkaline phosphatase (11 patients, 9%]), and anaemia (nine patients, 7%). Confirmed objective responses were recorded in ten (15%) of 66 patients who had recently progressed on vemurafenib, with a median progression-free survival of 2·8 months (95% CI 2·6–3·4). Confirmed objective responses were noted in 55 (87%) of 63 patients who had never received a BRAF inhibitor, including six (10%) who had a complete response; median progression-free survival was 13·7 months (95% CI 10·1–17·5). Interpretation The combination of vemurafenib and cobimetinib was safe and tolerable when administered at the respective maximum tolerated doses. The combination has promising antitumour activity and further clinical development is warranted in patients with advanced BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, particularly in those who have never received a BRAF inhibitor; confirmatory clinical testing is ongoing. Funding F Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech.
    The lancet oncology. 01/2014;
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    Thomas F Gajewski, Hans Schreiber, Yang-Xin Fu
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    ABSTRACT: Most tumor cells express antigens that can mediate recognition by host CD8(+) T cells. Cancers that are detected clinically must have evaded antitumor immune responses to grow progressively. Recent work has suggested two broad categories of tumor escape based on cellular and molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. One major subset shows a T cell-inflamed phenotype consisting of infiltrating T cells, a broad chemokine profile and a type I interferon signature indicative of innate immune activation. These tumors appear to resist immune attack through the dominant inhibitory effects of immune system-suppressive pathways. The other major phenotype lacks this T cell-inflamed phenotype and appears to resist immune attack through immune system exclusion or ignorance. These two major phenotypes of tumor microenvironment may require distinct immunotherapeutic interventions for maximal therapeutic effect.
    Nature Immunology 10/2013; 14(10):1014-22. · 26.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor escape from immune-mediated destruction has been associated with immunosuppressive mechanisms that inhibit T cell activation. Although evidence for an active immune response, including infiltration with CD8(+) T cells, can be found in a subset of patients, those tumors are nonetheless not immunologically rejected. In the current report, we show that it is the subset of T cell-inflamed tumors that showed high expression of three defined immunosuppressive mechanisms: indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), PD-L1/B7-H1, and FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting that these inhibitory pathways might serve as negative feedback mechanisms that followed, rather than preceded, CD8(+) T cell infiltration. Mechanistic studies in mice revealed that up-regulated expression of IDO and PD-L1, as well as recruitment of Tregs, in the tumor microenvironment depended on the presence of CD8(+) T cells. The former was driven by interferon-γ and the latter by a production of CCR4-binding chemokines along with a component of induced proliferation. Our results argue that these major immunosuppressive pathways are intrinsically driven by the immune system rather than being orchestrated by cancer cells, and imply that cancer immunotherapy approaches targeting negative regulatory immune checkpoints might be preferentially beneficial for patients with a preexisting T cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment.
    Science translational medicine 08/2013; 5(200):200ra116. · 10.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy is associated with durable clinical benefit in patients with melanoma. The goal of this article is to provide evidence-based consensus recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in the clinical management of patients with high-risk and advanced-stage melanoma in the USA. To achieve this goal, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer sponsored a panel of melanoma experts-including physicians, nurses, and patient advocates-to develop a consensus for the clinical application of tumour immunotherapy for patients with melanoma. The Institute of Medicine clinical practice guidelines were used as a basis for this consensus development. A systematic literature search was performed for high-impact studies in English between 1992 and 2012 and was supplemented as appropriate by the panel. This consensus report focuses on issues related to patient selection, toxicity management, clinical end points and sequencing or combination of therapy. The literature review and consensus panel voting and discussion were used to generate recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in patients with melanoma, and to assess and rate the strength of the supporting evidence. From the peer-reviewed literature the consensus panel identified a role for interferon-α2b, pegylated-interferon-α2b, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and ipilimumab in the clinical management of melanoma. Expert recommendations for how to incorporate these agents into the therapeutic approach to melanoma are provided in this consensus statement. Tumour immunotherapy is a useful therapeutic strategy in the management of patients with melanoma and evidence-based consensus recommendations for clinical integration are provided and will be updated as warranted.
    Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 08/2013; · 15.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PTEN is thought to play a critical role in T cell activation by negatively regulating the PI3K signaling pathway important for cellular activation, growth, and proliferation. To directly eliminate PTEN in postthymic T cells for studies of functional effects, we used CAR transgenic × PTEN(flox/flox) mice, which enabled gene deletion using a Cre adenovirus in vitro. These mice were also immunized to generate stable Th1 clones that could have PTEN deleted when desired. PTEN-deleted T cells exhibited enhanced IL-2 production, proliferation, and Akt phosphorylation upon TCR/CD28 engagement, whereas T cell survival was not potentiated. Gene expression profiling revealed a small subset of induced genes that were augmented upon PTEN deletion. However, PTEN-deficient T cells still required CD28 costimulation for IL-2 production and remained susceptible to anti-CD3-induced anergy. The absence of PTEN within the CD8 T cell compartment led to markedly increased cytolytic activity following an allogeneic MLR in vitro, without increasing autologous MLR activity. Our results indicate that deletion of PTEN can augment the activation of postthymic T cells but does not mediate CD28 independence or anergy resistance. Nonetheless, PTEN inhibition may be a viable target for immune potentiation owing to increased cytokine production by activated CD4(+) cells and increased cytotoxicity by CD8(+) T cells.
    The Journal of Immunology 07/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSEAmplifications and mutations in the KIT proto-oncogene in subsets of melanomas provide therapeutic opportunities. PATIENTS AND METHODS We conducted a multicenter phase II trial of imatinib in metastatic mucosal, acral, or chronically sun-damaged (CSD) melanoma with KIT amplifications and/or mutations. Patients received imatinib 400 mg once per day or 400 mg twice per day if there was no initial response. Dose reductions were permitted for treatment-related toxicities. Additional oncogene mutation screening was performed by mass spectroscopy.ResultsTwenty-five patients were enrolled (24 evaluable). Eight patients (33%) had tumors with KIT mutations, 11 (46%) with KIT amplifications, and five (21%) with both. Median follow-up was 10.6 months (range, 3.7 to 27.1 months). Best overall response rate (BORR) was 29% (21% excluding nonconfirmed responses) with a two-stage 95% CI of 13% to 51%. BORR was significantly greater than the hypothesized null of 5% and statistically significantly different by mutation status (7 of 13 or 54% KIT mutated v 0% KIT amplified only). There were no statistical differences in rates of progression or survival by mutation status or by melanoma site. The overall disease control rate was 50% but varied significantly by KIT mutation status (77% mutated v 18% amplified). Four patients harbored pretreatment NRAS mutations, and one patient acquired increased KIT amplification after treatment. CONCLUSION Melanomas that arise on mucosal, acral, or CSD skin should be assessed for KIT mutations. Imatinib can be effective when tumors harbor KIT mutations, but not if KIT is amplified only. NRAS mutations and KIT copy number gain may be mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to imatinib.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 06/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent insights into the genetic and somatic aberrations have initiated a new era of rapidly evolving targeted and immune-based treatments for melanoma. After decades of unsuccessful attempts to finding a more effective cure in the treatment of melanoma now we have several drugs active in melanoma. The possibility to use these drugs in combination to improve responses to overcome the resistance, to potentiate the action of immune system with the new immunomodulating antibodies, and identification of biomarkers that can predict the response to a particular therapy represent new concepts and approaches in the clinical management of melanoma. The third "Melanoma Research: "A bridge from Naples to the World" meeting, shortened as "Bridge Melanoma Meeting" took place in Naples, December 2 to 4th, 2012. The four topics of discussion at this meeting were: advances in molecular profiling and novel biomarkers, combination therapies, novel concepts toward integrating biomarkers and therapies into contemporary clinical management of patients with melanoma across the entire spectrum of disease stage, and the knowledge gained from the biology of tumor microenvironment across different tumors as a bridge to impact on prognosis and response to therapy in melanoma. This international congress gathered more than 30 international faculty members who in an interactive atmosphere which stimulated discussion and exchange of their experience regarding the most recent advances in research and clinical management of melanoma patients.
    Journal of Translational Medicine 06/2013; 11(1):137. · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spontaneous antigen-specific T cell responses can be generated in hosts harboring a variety of solid malignancies, but are subverted by immune evasion mechanisms active within the tumor microenvironment. In contrast to solid tumors, the mechanisms that regulate T cell activation versus tolerance to hematological malignancies have been underexplored. A murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model was used to investigate antigen-specific T cell responses against AML cells inoculated i.v. versus s.c. Robust antigen-specific T cell responses were generated against AML cells after s.c., but not i.v., inoculation. In fact, i.v. AML cell inoculation prevented functional T cell activation in response to subsequent s.c. AML cell challenge. T cell dysfunction was antigen specific and did not depend on Tregs or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Antigen-specific TCR-Tg CD8+ T cells proliferated, but failed to accumulate, and expressed low levels of effector cytokines in hosts after i.v. AML induction, consistent with abortive T cell activation and peripheral tolerance. Administration of agonistic anti-CD40 Ab to activate host APCs enhanced accumulation of functional T cells and prolonged survival. Our results suggest that antigen-specific T cell tolerance is a potent immune evasion mechanism in hosts with AML that can be reversed in vivo after CD40 engagement.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 04/2013; · 15.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For tumor antigen-specific T cells to effectively control the growth of cancer cells in vivo, they must gain access to, and function within, the tumor microenvironment. While tumor antigen-based vaccines and T cell adoptive transfer strategies can result in clinical benefit in a subset of patients, most of the patients do not respond clinically. Even for tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-based adoptive transfer for patients with metastatic melanoma, which can provide tumor shrinkage in around 50% of treated individuals, many patients are not eligible, in part because there are not sufficient TIL present in the resected tumor. Thus, the denominator is in fact larger, and it has been suggested that absence of TIL may be a marker for poor efficacy of immunotherapies in general. While qualitative and/or quantitative features of the T cells are important considerations for efficacy, a major component of primary resistance likely can be attributed to the tumor microenvironment. Data are accumulating suggesting that two major categories of immune resistance within the tumor microenvironment may exist: failure of T cell trafficking due to low levels of inflammation and lack of chemokines for migration, and dominant suppression through immune inhibitory mechanisms. New therapeutic interventions are being guided by these observations, and preliminary clinical success is validating this working model.
    Current opinion in immunology 04/2013; · 10.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T cell anergy is one of the mechanisms contributing to peripheral tolerance, particularly in the context of progressively growing tumors and in tolerogenic treatments promoting allograft acceptance. We recently reported that early growth response gene 2 (Egr2) is a critical transcription factor for the induction of anergy in vitro and in vivo, which was identified based on its ability to regulate the expression of inhibitory signaling molecules diacylglycerol kinase (DGK)-α and -ζ. We reasoned that other transcriptional targets of Egr2 might encode additional factors important for T cell anergy and immune regulation. Thus, we conducted two sets of genome-wide screens: gene expression profiling of wild type versus Egr2-deleted T cells treated under anergizing conditions, and a ChIP-Seq analysis to identify genes that bind Egr2 in anergic cells. Merging of these data sets revealed 49 targets that are directly regulated by Egr2. Among these are inhibitory signaling molecules previously reported to contribute to T cell anergy, but unexpectedly, also cell surface molecules and secreted factors, including lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (Lag3), Class-I-MHC-restricted T cell associated molecule (Crtam), Semaphorin 7A (Sema7A), and chemokine CCL1. These observations suggest that anergic T cells might not simply be functionally inert, and may have additional functional properties oriented towards other cellular components of the immune system.
    Molecular Immunology 03/2013; · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    Stefani Spranger, Thomas Gajewski
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    ABSTRACT: An effective anti-tumor immune response requires the coordinated action of the innate and adaptive phases of the immune system. Critical processes include the activation of dendritic cells to present antigens, produce cytokines including type I interferons, and express multiple costimulatory ligands; induction of a productive T cell response within lymph nodes; migration of activated T cells to the tumor microenvironment in response to chemokines and homing receptor expression; and having effector T cells gain access to antigen-expressing tumor cells and maintain sufficient functionality to destroy them. However, tumors can become adept at escaping the immune response, developing multiple mechanisms to disrupt key processes. In general, tumors can be assigned into two different, major groups depending on whether the tumor there is an 'inflamed' or 'non-inflamed' tumor microenvironment. Improvements in our understanding of the interactions between the immune system and cancer have resulted in the development of various strategies to improve the immune-mediated control of tumors in both sub-groups. Categories of major immunotherapeutic intervention include methods to increase the frequency of tumor antigen-specific effector T cells in the circulation, strategies to block or uncouple a range of immune suppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment, and tactics to induce de novo immune inflammation within the tumor microenvironment. The latter may be particularly important for eliciting immune recognition of non-inflamed tumor phenotypes. The premise put forth in this review is that synergistic therapeutic effects in vivo may be derived from combination therapies taken from distinct "bins" based on these mechanisms of action. Early data in both preclinical and some clinical studies provide support for this model. We also suggest that optimal application of these combinations may be aided by appropriate patient selection based on predictive biomarkers.
    Journal for immunotherapy of cancer. 01/2013; 1:16.
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    ABSTRACT: Background CEA is expressed in >90% of pancreatic cancers (PC) and may be an appropriate immunotherapy target. CEA is poorly immunogenic due to immune tolerance; CAP1-6D, an altered peptide ligand can help bypass tolerance. We conducted a pilot randomized phase I trial in PC patients to determine the peptide dose required to induce an optimal CD8+ T cell response. Methods Patients with a PS 0-1, HLA-A2+ and CEA-expressing, previously-treated PC were randomized to receive 10 μg (arm A), 100 μg (arm B) or 1000 μg (arm C) of CEA peptide emulsified in Montanide and GM-CSF, given every 2 weeks until disease progression. Results Sixty-six patients were screened and 19 enrolled of whom 14 received at least 3 doses of the vaccine and thus evaluated for the primary immunologic endpoint. A median of 4 cycles (range 1-81) was delivered. Median and mean peak IFN-γ T cell response by ELISPOT (spots per 104 CD8+ cells, Arm A/B/C) was 11/52/271 (A vs. C, p = 0.028) for medians and 37/148/248 (A vs. C, p = 0.032) for means. T cell responses developed or increased in 20%/60%/100% of pts in Arms A/B/C. Seven of the 19 patients remain alive at a minimum 32 months from trial initiation, including three with unresectable disease. Conclusions The T cell response in this randomized phase I trial was dose-dependent with the 1 mg CEA peptide dose eliciting the most robust T cell responses. A signal of clinical benefit was observed and no significant toxicity was noted. Further evaluation of 1 mg CEA peptide with stronger adjuvants, and/or combined with agents to overcome immune inhibitory pathways, may be warranted in PC pts. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00203892
    Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer. 01/2013; 1(1).
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Multiple farnesylated proteins are involved in signal transduction in cancer. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) have been developed as a strategy to inhibit the function of these proteins. As FTIs inhibit proliferation of melanoma cell lines, we undertook a study to assess the impact of a FTI in advanced melanoma. As farnesylated proteins are also important for T cell activation, measurement of effects on T cell function was also pursued. METHODS: A 3-stage trial design was developed with a maximum of 40 patients and early stopping if there were no responders in the first 14, or fewer than 2 responders in the first 28 patients. Eligibility included performance status of 0--1, no prior chemotherapy, at most 1 prior immunotherapy, no brain metastases, and presence of at least 2 cutaneous lesions amenable to biopsy. R115777 was administered twice per day for 21 days of a 28-day cycle. Patients were evaluated every 2 cycles by RECIST. Blood and tumor were analyzed pre-treatment and during week 7. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Two patients had grade 3 toxicities, which included myelosuppression, nausea/vomiting, elevated BUN, and anorexia. There were no clinical responses. All patients analyzed showed potent inhibition of FT activity (85-98%) in tumor tissue; inhibition of phosphorylated ERK and Akt was also observed. T cells showed evidence of FT inhibition and diminished IFN-gamma production. CONCLUSIONS: Despite potent target inhibition, R115777 showed no evidence of clinical activity in this cohort of melanoma patients. Inhibition of T cell function by FTIs has potential clinical implications.Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00060125.
    Journal of Translational Medicine 12/2012; 10(1):246. · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Src kinases are activated in melanoma, and inhibition of Src kinase activity has pre-clinical anti-tumor effects. Targeting this pathway could therefore have therapeutic activity in patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and methods We conducted a multi-center, open-label study of the Src kinase inhibitor saracatanib (AZD0530) in patients with metastatic melanoma. Twenty-three patients received saracatanib at a dose of 175 mg daily. The primary objectives were to determine whether this agent had clinical activity in patients with advanced melanoma and whether it increased progression free survival. Functional effects on circulating T cells were also assessed. Results Twenty-three patients received oral saracatanib on a continuous daily dosing regimen. There were no objective clinical responses. Saracatanib was generally well tolerated with few grade 3-4 adverse events. T cell function was inhibited in most patients, based on decreased superantigen-induced IL-2 production in post- versus pre-treatment samples. Conclusions Saracatanib has minimal clinical activity as a single agent in an unselected population of patients with advanced melanoma, as evidenced by a lack of objective responses in this study. Reduced T cell cytokine production in most treated patients suggests potential immune suppressive activity by this agent.
    Investigational New Drugs 11/2012; · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T cell receptor engagement in the absence of costimulation results in a hyporesponsive state termed anergy. Understanding the transcriptional regulation of other T cell differentiation states has provided critical information regarding the biology of T cell regulation in vivo. However, the transcriptional regulation of T cell anergy has been poorly understood. Using the key anergy target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) α as a focal point, we identified early growth response gene 2 (Egr2) as a central transcription factor that regulates the anergic state. Conditional Egr2 deletion in peripheral T cells abolishes induced expression of DGK-α and other anergy genes and restores Ras/MAPK signaling, IL-2 production, and proliferation upon attempted anergy induction. Using superantigen- and tumor-induced anergy models, we found that Egr2 is necessary for anergy induction in vivo. Collectively, our results implicate Egr2 as an essential transcriptional regulator of the T cell anergy program.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 11/2012; · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Unexpectedly, many cancers appear to induce a spontaneous adaptive T cell response. The presence of a T cell infiltrate has been linked to favorable clinical outcome in multiple cancer types. However, the innate immune pathways that bridge to an adaptive immune response under sterile conditions are poorly understood. Recent data have indicated that tumors can induce type I interferon (IFN) production by host antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which is required for a spontaneous T cell response in vivo. The innate immune sensing pathways that trigger type I IFN production are being elucidated. Host type I IFNs are also required for optimal therapeutic efficacy with radiation. This recently uncovered role for host type I IFNs for antitumor immunity has important fundamental and clinical implications.
    Trends in Immunology 10/2012; · 9.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prediction of clinical outcome in cancer is usually achieved by histopathological evaluation of tissue samples obtained during surgical resection of the primary tumor. Traditional tumor staging (AJCC/UICC-TNM classification) summarizes data on tumor burden (T), presence of cancer cells in draining and regional lymph nodes (N) and evidence for metastases (M). However, it is now recognized that clinical outcome can significantly vary among patients within the same stage. The current classification provides limited prognostic information, and does not predict response to therapy. Recent literature has alluded to the importance of the host immune system in controlling tumor progression. Thus, evidence supports the notion to include immunological biomarkers, implemented as a tool for the prediction of prognosis and response to therapy. Accumulating data, collected from large cohorts of human cancers, has demonstrated the impact of immune-classification, which has a prognostic value that may add to the significance of the AJCC/UICC TNM-classification. It is therefore imperative to begin to incorporate the 'Immunoscore' into traditional classification, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool. Introduction of this parameter as a biomarker to classify cancers, as part of routine diagnostic and prognostic assessment of tumors, will facilitate clinical decision-making including rational stratification of patient treatment. Equally, the inherent complexity of quantitative immunohistochemistry, in conjunction with protocol variation across laboratories, analysis of different immune cell types, inconsistent region selection criteria, and variable ways to quantify immune infiltration, all underline the urgent requirement to reach assay harmonization. In an effort to promote the Immunoscore in routine clinical settings, an international task force was initiated. This review represents a follow-up of the announcement of this initiative, and of the J Transl Med. editorial from January 2012. Immunophenotyping of tumors may provide crucial novel prognostic information. The results of this international validation may result in the implementation of the Immunoscore as a new component for the classification of cancer, designated TNM-I (TNM-Immune).
    Journal of Translational Medicine 10/2012; 10(1):205. · 3.46 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,229.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1989–2014
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • • Section of Hematology and Oncology
      • • Department of Medicine (Chicago)
      • • Department of Pathology (Chicago)
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1988–2014
    • University of Chicago
      • • Committee on Immunology
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2013
    • Sidra Medical and Research Cente
      Ad Dawḩah, Ad Dawḩah, Qatar
  • 1995–2011
    • The University of Chicago Medical Center
      • • Section of Hematology/Oncology
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1998
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 1996
    • Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd Belgium
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 1995–1996
    • Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
      La Jolla, California, United States
    • Catholic University of Louvain
      • Duve Institute
      Walloon Region, Belgium