Patricia Ruiz Noppinger

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

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Publications (14)107.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) has been claimed as an estrogen receptor. However, the literature reports controversial findings and the physiological function of GPR30 is not fully understood yet. Consistent with studies assigning a role of GPR30 in the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, GPR30 expression has been reported in small arterial vessels, pancreas and chief gastric cells of the stomach. Therefore, we hypothesized a role of GPR30 in the onset and progression of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. In order to test our hypothesis, we investigated the effects of a high-fat diet on the metabolic and cardiovascular profiles of Gpr30-deficient mice (GPR30-lacZ mice). We found that GPR30-lacZ female, rather than male, mice had significant lower levels of HDL along with an increase in fat liver accumulation as compared to control mice. However, two indicators of cardiac performance assessed by echocardiography, ejection fraction and fractional shortening were both decreased in an age-dependent manner only in Gpr30-lacZ male mice. Collectively our results point to a potential role of Gpr30 in preserving lipid metabolism and cardiac function in a sex- and age-dependent fashion.
    Gene 02/2014; · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed high-throughput gene trapping and, in particular, gene-targeting pipelines and generated more than 17,400 mutant murine embryonic stem (ES) cell clones and more than 1,700 mutant mouse strains, most of them conditional. A common IKMC web portal ( www.knockoutmouse.org ) has been established, allowing easy access to this unparalleled biological resource. The IKMC materials considerably enhance functional gene annotation of the mammalian genome and will have a major impact on future biomedical research.
    Mammalian Genome 09/2012; 23(9-10):580-6. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used a murine model of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) to test whether reducing ventricular load prevents or slows development of this cardiomyopathy. At present, no therapy exists to slow progression of ARVC. Genetically conferred dysfunction of the mechanical cell-cell connections, often associated with reduced expression of plakoglobin, is thought to cause ARVC. Littermate pairs of heterozygous plakoglobin-deficient mice (plako(+/-)) and wild-type (WT) littermates underwent 7 weeks of endurance training (daily swimming). Mice were randomized to blinded load-reducing therapy (furosemide and nitrates) or placebo. Therapy prevented training-induced right ventricular (RV) enlargement in plako(+/-) mice (RV volume: untreated plako(+/-) 136 ± 5 μl; treated plako(+/-) 78 ± 5 μl; WT 81 ± 5 μl; p < 0.01 for untreated vs. WT and untreated vs. treated; mean ± SEM). In isolated, Langendorff-perfused hearts, ventricular tachycardias (VTs) were more often induced in untreated plako(+/-) hearts (15 of 25), than in treated plako(+/-) hearts (5 of 19) or in WT hearts (6 of 21, both p < 0.05). Epicardial mapping of the RV identified macro-re-entry as the mechanism of ventricular tachycardia. The RV longitudinal conduction velocity was reduced in untreated but not in treated plako(+/-) mice (p < 0.01 for untreated vs. WT and untreated vs. treated). Myocardial concentration of phosphorylated connexin43 was lower in plako(+/-) hearts with VTs compared with hearts without VTs and was reduced in untreated plako(+/-) compared with WT (both p < 0.05). Plako(+/-) hearts showed reduced myocardial plakoglobin concentration, whereas β-catenin and N-cadherin concentration was not changed. Load-reducing therapy prevents training-induced development of ARVC in plako(+/-) mice.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 02/2011; 57(6):740-50. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated sex differences and the role of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) on myocardial hypertrophy in a mouse model of pressure overload. We performed transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery in male and female wild-type (WT) and ERbeta knockout (ERbeta(-/-)) mice. All mice were characterized by echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements and were killed 9 wk after surgery. Left ventricular (LV) samples were analyzed by microarray profiling, real-time RT-PCR, and histology. After 9 wk, WT males showed more hypertrophy and heart failure signs than WT females. Notably, WT females developed a concentric form of hypertrophy, while males developed eccentric hypertrophy. ERbeta deletion augmented the TAC-induced increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in both sexes. Gene expression profiling revealed that WT male hearts had a stronger induction of matrix-related genes and a stronger repression of mitochondrial genes than WT female hearts. ERbeta(-/-) mice exhibited a different transcriptional response. ERbeta(-/-)/TAC mice of both sexes exhibited induction of proapoptotic genes with a stronger expression in ERbeta(-/-) males. Cardiac fibrosis was more pronounced in male WT/TAC than in female mice. This difference was abolished in ERbeta(-/-) mice. The number of apoptotic nuclei was increased in both sexes of ERbeta(-/-)/TAC mice, most prominent in males. Female sex offers protection against ventricular chamber dilation in the TAC model. Both female sex and ERbeta attenuate the development of fibrosis and apoptosis, thus slowing the progression to heart failure.
    AJP Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 04/2010; 298(6):R1597-606. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The female sex hormone estradiol plays an important role in reproduction, mammary gland development, bone turnover, metabolism, and cardiovascular function. The effects of estradiol are mediated by two classical nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). In 2005, G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) was claimed to act as a non-classical estrogen receptor that was also activated by the ERalpha and ERbeta antagonists tamoxifen and fulvestrant (ICI 182780). Despite many conflicting results regarding the potential role of GPR30 as an estrogen receptor, the official nomenclature was changed to GPER (G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor). This review revisits the inconsistencies that still exist in the literature and focuses on selected publications that basically address the following two questions: what is the evidence for and against the hypothesis that GPR30 acts as an estrogen receptor? What is the potential in vivo role of GPR30? Thus, in the first part we focus on conflicting results from in vitro studies analysing the subcellular localization of GPR30, its ability to bind (or not to bind) estradiol and to signal (or not to signal) in response to estradiol. In the second part, we discuss the strengths and limitations of four available GPR30 mouse models. We elucidate the potential impact of different targeting strategies on phenotypic diversity.
    Steroids 01/2010; 75(8-9):603-10. · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple reports implicated the function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-30 with nongenomic effects of estrogen, suggesting that GPR30 might be a G-protein coupled estrogen receptor. However, the findings are controversial and the expression pattern of GPR30 on a cell type level as well as its function in vivo remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify cell types that express Gpr30 in vivo by analyzing a mutant mouse model that harbors a lacZ reporter (Gpr30-lacZ) in the Gpr30 locus leading to a partial deletion of the Gpr30 coding sequence. Using this strategy, we identified the following cell types expressing Gpr30: 1) an endothelial cell subpopulation in small arterial vessels of multiple tissues, 2) smooth muscle cells and pericytes in the brain, 3) gastric chief cells in the stomach, 4) neuronal subpopulations in the cortex as well as the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus, 5) cell populations in the intermediate and anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, and 6) in the medulla of the adrenal gland. In further experiments, we aimed to decipher the function of Gpr30 by analyzing the phenotype of Gpr30-lacZ mice. The body weight as well as fat mass was unchanged in Gpr30-lacZ mice, even if fed with a high-fat diet. Flow cytometric analysis revealed lower frequencies of T cells in both sexes of Gpr30-lacZ mice. Within the T-cell cluster, the amount of CD62L-expressing cells was clearly reduced, suggesting an impaired production of T cells in the thymus of Gpr30-lacZ mice.
    Endocrinology 01/2009; 150(4):1722-30. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene trapping is used to introduce insertional mutations into genes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). It is performed with gene trap vectors that simultaneously mutate and report the expression of the endogenous gene at the site of insertion and provide a DNA tag for rapid identification of the disrupted gene. Gene traps have been employed worldwide to assemble libraries of mouse ESC lines harboring mutations in single genes, which can be used to make mutant mice. However, most of the employed gene trap vectors require gene expression for reporting a gene trap event and therefore genes that are poorly expressed may be under-represented in the existing libraries. To address this problem, we have developed a novel class of gene trap vectors that can induce gene expression at insertion sites, thereby bypassing the problem of intrinsic poor expression. We show here that the insertion of the osteopontin enhancer into several conventional gene trap vectors significantly increases the gene trapping efficiency in high-throughput screens and facilitates the recovery of poorly expressed genes.
    Nucleic Acids Research 10/2008; 36(20):e133. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pressure overload (PO) first causes cardiac hypertrophy and then heart failure (HF), which are associated with sex differences in cardiac morphology and function. We aimed to identify genes that may cause HF-related sex differences. We used a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse model leading to hypertrophy without sex differences in cardiac function after 2 weeks, but with sex differences in hypertrophy 6 and 9 weeks after TAC. Cardiac gene expression was analyzed 2 weeks after surgery. Deregulated genes were classified into functional gene ontology (GO) categories and used for pathway analysis. Classical marker genes of hypertrophy were similarly upregulated in both sexes (alpha-actin, ANP, BNP, CTGF). Thirty-five genes controlling mitochondrial function (PGC-1, cytochrome oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase) had lower expression in males compared to females after TAC. Genes encoding ribosomal proteins and genes associated with extracellular matrix remodeling exhibited relative higher expression in males (collagen 3, matrix metalloproteinase 2, TIMP2, and TGFbeta2, all about twofold) after TAC. We confirmed 87% of the gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction. By GO classification, female-specific genes were related to mitochondria and metabolism and males to matrix and biosynthesis. Promoter studies confirmed the upregulation of PGC-1 by E2. Less downregulation of metabolic genes in female hearts and increased protein synthesis capacity and deregulation of matrix remodeling in male hearts characterize the sex-specific early response to PO. These differences could contribute to subsequent sex differences in cardiac function and HF.
    Journal of Molecular Medicine 10/2008; 86(9):1013-24. · 4.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence and clinical manifestation of several cardiovascular diseases vary considerably with sex and age. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular basis of these differences may represent a starting point for an improved gender-specific medicine. Despite the fact that sex-specific differences have been observed in the cardiovascular system of humans and animal models, systematic analyses of sexual dimorphisms at the transcriptional level in the healthy heart are missing. Therefore we performed gene expression profiling on mouse and human cardiac samples of both sexes and young as well as aged individuals and verified our results for a subset of genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction in independent left ventricular samples. To tackle the question whether sex differences are evolutionarily conserved, we also compared sexually dimorphic genes between both species. We found that genes located on sex chromosomes were the most abundant ones among the sexually dimorphic genes. Male-specific expression of Y-linked genes was observed in mouse hearts as well as in the human myocardium (e.g. Ddx3y, Eif2s3y and Jarid1d). Higher expression levels of X-linked genes were detected in female mice for Xist, Timp1 and Car5b and XIST, EIF2S3X and GPM6B in women. Furthermore, genes on autosomal chromosomes encoding cytochromes of the monoxygenase family (e.g. Cyp2b10), carbonic anhydrases (e.g. Car2 and Car3) and natriuretic peptides (e.g. Nppb) were identified with sex- and/or age-specific expression levels. This study underlines the relevance of sex and age as modifiers of cardiac gene expression.
    Journal of Molecular Medicine 02/2008; 86(1):61-74. · 4.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NOTE: In the version of this article initially published, the second author (Jens Hansen) should have been listed as an equal contributor with the first author. The last two authors (Harald von Melchner and Patricia Ruiz Noppinger) should have been listed as corresponding authors. The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.
    Nature Genetics 09/2007; 39(8):933-4. · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the adult heart, a variety of stresses induce re-expression of a fetal gene program in association with myocyte hypertrophy and heart failure. Here we show that histone deacetylase-2 (Hdac2) regulates expression of many fetal cardiac isoforms. Hdac2 deficiency or chemical histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition prevented the re-expression of fetal genes and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in hearts exposed to hypertrophic stimuli. Resistance to hypertrophy was associated with increased expression of the gene encoding inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase f (Inpp5f) resulting in constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (Gsk3beta) via inactivation of thymoma viral proto-oncogene (Akt) and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (Pdk1). In contrast, Hdac2 transgenic mice had augmented hypertrophy associated with inactivated Gsk3beta. Chemical inhibition of activated Gsk3beta allowed Hdac2-deficient adults to become sensitive to hypertrophic stimulation. These results suggest that Hdac2 is an important molecular target of HDAC inhibitors in the heart and that Hdac2 and Gsk3beta are components of a regulatory pathway providing an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.
    Nature Medicine 04/2007; 13(3):324-31. · 22.86 Impact Factor
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    Jörg Isensee, Patricia Ruiz Noppinger
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    ABSTRACT: The sexually dimorphic differentiation of the bipotential gonad into testis or ovary initiates the sexually dimorphic development of mammals and leads to divergent hormone concentrations between the sexes throughout life. However, despite the fact that anatomic and hormonal differences between the sexes are well described, only a few studies have investigated the manifestation of these differences at the transcriptional level in mammalian somatic tissue. This review focuses on basic regulatory mechanisms of sex-specific gene expression and examines recent gene expression profiling studies to outline basic differences between the sexes at the transcriptome level in somatic tissues. To identify gene expression profiling studies addressing sexually dimorphic gene expression, the PubMed database was searched using the terms sex and dimorp and gene expression not drosophila not elegans. Abstracts of all identified publications were screened for studies explicitly using microarrays to identify sex differences in somatic tissues of rodents or humans. The search was restricted to English-language articles published in the past 5 years. Reference lists of identified articles as well as microarray databases (Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress) were also used. The application of microarray technology has enabled the systematic assessment of sex-biased gene expression on the transcriptome level, indicating that the regulatory pathways underlying sexual differentiation give rise to extensive differences in somatic gene expression across organisms. Sustainable annotation of sex-biased gene expression provides a key to understanding basic physiological differences between healthy males and females as well as those with diseases.
    Gender Medicine 02/2007; 4 Suppl B:S75-95. · 1.69 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

486 Citations
107.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2011
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • • Center for Cardiovascular Research
      • • Institute of General Medicine
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany