Takehiko Maeda

Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niahi-niigata, Niigata, Japan

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Publications (42)102.09 Total impact

  • Takehiko Maeda, Masanobu Ozaki
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    ABSTRACT: Transient receptor potential protein (TRP) channels are distributed in pain pathways including primary afferent neurons and function as transduction of various noxious stimuli to innocuous stimuli. TRP channels are considered as molecular basis of chronic pain. Targeting TRPs may lead to novel class of analgesics, and so drug-discovery efforts are focused on TRP agonists and its antagonists. Few products have, however, been placed on the market, because most of candidates have adverse effects. A lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system causes neuropathic pain, a type of chronic pain. Neuropathic pain is intolerable and obstinate and therefore, debilitates the affected patients. A great deal of effort has been made to develop medicine targeting molecules involved in neuropathic pain, whereby the promising therapeutically targeted molecules have been identified. Neuroinflammation, based on pathological alteration in crosstalk between nervous system and immune system, has been a focus of attention as pathological mechanism involved in development of neuropathic pain. Recently, we used an animal model for neuropathic pain to find the possibility that neuropathic pain was exacerbated by adipokines derived from perineural adipocytes distributed in injured peripheral neurons. A working hypothesis is therefore proposed that the perineural adipocytes interacts with the immune cells, which also have TRPV1, in injured peripheral nerve, followed by a paracrine loop involving proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adipokines derived from them which aggravates and prolongs pain. Here, we overview the developmental status in TRPV1-targetting analgesics and illustrate our recent findings in terms of neuroinflammation.
    YAKUGAKU ZASSHI 01/2014; 134(3):373-8. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that nicotine (NIC)-induced analgesia was elicited in part by activation of the endogenous opioid system. Moreover, it is well known that NIC has physical-dependence liability, but its mechanism is unclear. Therefore, we examined whether physical dependence on NIC was mediated by activation of the endogenous opioid system in ICR mice. We evaluated increased serum corticosterone (SCS) as an indicator of NIC withdrawal, as it is a quantitative indicator of naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist, NLX)-precipitated morphine withdrawal in mice. In this study, NLX precipitated an SCS increase in mice receiving repeated NIC, by a dose-dependent mechanism, and correlated with the dose and number of days of repeated NIC administration. When an opioid receptor antagonist (naltrexone) was concomitantly administered with repeated NIC, the NLX-precipitated SCS increase was not elicited. Concomitant administration of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist (methyllycaconitine) with repeated NIC, but not the α4β2 nAChR antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), did not elicit an SCS increase by NLX. Thus, a physical dependence on NIC was in part mediated by the activation of the endogenous opioid system, located downstream of α7 nAChR.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 12/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathic pain, which is intolerable and persistent, arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and can be debilitating for the affected patients. Accumulating evidence from animal studies has revealed the potential molecular basis for neuropathic pain, resulting in many promising therapeutic targets. While efforts at drug discovery have been made, conventional pharmacotherapy, including the use of opioid analgesics, is still insufficient for the relief of neuropathic pain. Therefore, novel target molecules that may lead to the development of promising analgesics are eagerly anticipated for improved treatment of neuropathic pain. In various insults such as sepsis and ischemia, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is released extracellularly to induce inflammation. HMGB1 was originally identified as a ubiquitous nuclear protein, but emerging evidence has suggested that HMGB1 also plays a role in neuroinflammation as a pro-inflammatory mediator. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be involved in the pathology of neuropathic pain. In fact, some reports demonstrate an involvement of HMGB1 in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain in experimental animals. Here, we overview the characteristics of HMGB1 as a pro-inflammatory mediator and show the promise of HMGB1 as a therapeutic target for neuropathic pain.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 11/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Emerging evidence indicates that chronic neuroinflammation plays a pivotal role in neuropathic pain. We explored whether activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) pathway on peripheral immune cells improves neuropathic pain. Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-chimeric mice were generated by transplantation of EGFP(+) bone marrow (BM) cells from EGFP-transgenic mice into wild-type mice. EGFP(+) BM-derived cells infiltrated the injured sciatic nerve (SCN) of EGFP-chimeric mice, and these cells were found to be F4/80(+) macrophages and Ly6G(+) neutrophils. The protein expression of nAChR subunit α4 and α7 were up-regulated in the injured SCN. Increased α4 and α7 subunits were localized on both BM-derived macrophages and neutrophils. When nicotine (20nmol) was perineurally administered once a day for 4days (days 0-3), PSL-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly prevented. Relieving effects of nicotine on neuropathic pain were reversed by co-administration of mecamylamine (20nmol), a non-selective antagonist for nAChRs. PSL-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed by perineural administration of nicotine. Taken together, the expression of α4β2 and α7 subtypes of nAChRs may be increased on circulating macrophages and neutrophils in injured peripheral nerves. Activation of nAChRs on immune cells may relieve neuropathic pain accompanied by the suppression of neuroinflammation.
    Neurochemistry International 09/2012; · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent observations indicate that peripheral nerve injury induces central sensitization through microglial activation and the release of inflammatory cytokines, resulting in the development of neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the involvement of spinal ceramide, a bioactive lipid, in the development of neuropathic pain induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). We found that the mRNA expression levels for ceramide synthase and neutral sphingomyelinase, which are enzymes of ceramide biosynthesis, were up-regulated in the spinal cord from 3h to 1 day after PSL. The mRNA expressions of cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) and the microglial specific molecules (Iba-1 and CD11b) were also increased in the spinal cord after PSL. In the von Frey test, intrathecal injection of the ceramide biosynthesis inhibitors Fumonisin B1 and GW4869 at 3h and day 3 after PSL significantly attenuated PSL-induced tactile allodynia. By immunohistochemistry, microglial activation in the dorsal horn was suppressed by Fumonisin B1 and GW4869. Therefore, we conclude that spinal ceramide may play a crucial role in PSL-induced neuropathic pain through the activation of microglia.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 04/2012; 421(2):318-22. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although a pharmacological relationship is known to exist between nicotine and morphine, the exact mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated crosstalk between the endogenous opioid system and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), specifically in nicotine-induced analgesia and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Nicotine and morphine were administered subcutaneously to mice and the effects of these drugs on analgesia and serum corticosterone (SCS) levels were evaluated by the tail-pinch method and fluorometric assay, respectively. Both nicotine and morphine produced analgesia and SCS increase after a single injection. Nicotine-induced analgesia was prevented by both mecamylamine (MEC; 1mg/kg) and naloxone (NLX; 1mg/kg), and also by repeated administration of morphine or nicotine. Morphine-induced analgesia was prevented by NLX, but not MEC, and by repeated administration of morphine, but not nicotine. Conversely, the nicotine-induced increase in SCS level was prevented by MEC, but not NLX. Morphine-induced SCS increase was prevented by NLX, but not MEC. Moreover, nicotine-induced analgesia was suppressed by dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE; an antagonist for the α4β2 nAChR) or methyllycaconitine (MLA; an antagonist for the α7 nAChR). The nicotine-induced increase in SCS level was suppressed by DHβE, but not MLA. Nicotine-induced analgesia may involve the endogenous opioid system through crosstalk with nicotinic pathways. However, the relationship between these systems does not extend to cooperative actions in nicotine-induced HPA-axis activation.
    Life sciences 12/2011; 89(25-26):956-61. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although there is growing evidence showing that the involvement of chemokines in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is associated with neuroinflammation, the details are unclear. We investigated the C-X-C chemokine ligand type 2 [macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)]/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) axis and epigenetic regulation of these molecules in neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury. Expression of MIP-2 and CXCR2 were up-regulated and localized on accumulated neutrophils and macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve (SCN) after partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). Perineural injection of MIP-2-neutralizing antibody (anti-MIP-2) or the CXCR2 antagonist N-(2-bromophenyl)-N'-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)urea (SB225002) prevented PSL-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Perineural injection of recombinant MIP-2 elicited neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Anti-MIP-2 suppressed neutrophil accumulation in the SCN after PSL. Neutrophil depletion by intraperitoneal injection of Ly6G antibody attenuated PSL-induced neuropathic pain. Both anti-MIP-2 and SB225002 suppressed up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the injured SCN. In addition, acetylation of histone H3 [lysine (Lys9)-acetylated histone H3 (AcK9-H3)] on the promoter region of MIP-2 and CXCR2 was increased in the injured SCN after PSL. Expression of AcK9-H3 was observed in the nuclei of neutrophils and macrophages surrounding the epineurium. Administration of the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid suppressed the up-regulation of MIP-2 and CXCR2 in the SCN after PSL and resulted in the prevention of PSL-induced neuropathic pain. Taken together, these results show that augmentation of the MIP-2/CXCR2 axis by hyperacetylation of histone H3 on the promoter region of MIP-2 and CXCR2 located in the injured peripheral nerve elicits chronic neuroinflammation through neutrophil accumulation, leading to neuropathic pain.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 12/2011; 340(3):577-87. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the involvement of spinal macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), an inflammatory chemokine, in partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. PSL increased MIP-1α mRNA levels as well as levels of the MIP-1α receptor, CCR1, but not CCR5 in the spinal dorsal horn. PSL-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were prevented by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of a neutralizing antibody of MIP-1α (2ng). Recombinant MIP-1α (10pmol, i.t.) elicited long-lasting tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice. These results suggest that peripheral nerve injury elicits the up-regulation of spinal MIP-1α and CCR1 to participate in neuropathic pain.
    Neuroscience Letters 10/2010; 484(1):17-21. · 2.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we investigated the role of the macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) in mice. MIP-1alpha mRNA and its protein were dramatically up-regulated after PSL, and MIP-1alpha was localized on macrophages and Schwann cells in the injured sciatic nerve (SCN). PSL-induced long-lasting tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were prevented by the perineural injection of anti-MIP-1alpha (2ng). Intraneural (20ng) and perineural (100ng) injection of recombinant MIP-1alpha elicited tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in sham-operated limb. MIP-1alpha receptors (CCR1 and CCR5) mRNA and their proteins were also up-regulated in the SCN after PSL, and were localized on macrophages and Schwann cells. PSL-induced tactile allodynia was attenuated by perineural injection (0.2nmol) of siRNA against CCR1 and CCR5. On the other hand, PSL-induced thermal hyperalgesia was prevented by siRNA against CCR5, but not CCR1. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA and its precursor protein in macrophages and Schwann cells were also up-regulated in the SCN after PSL, and PSL-induced neuropathic pain was prevented by the perineural injection of anti-IL-1beta (2ng). PSL-induced IL-1beta up-regulation was suppressed by anti-MIP-1alpha and siRNA against CCR1 and CCR5. Perineural injection of nicotine (20nmol), a macrophage suppressor, prevented PSL-induced neuropathic pain and suppressed MIP-1alpha and IL-1beta expressions. In conclusion, we propose a novel critical molecule MIP-1alpha derived from macrophages and Schwann cells that appears to play a crucial role in the development of neuropathic pain induced by PSL.
    Pain 03/2010; 149(2):305-15. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined the involvement of serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP) sensitive to okadaic acid (OA) in the antinociceptive effect of morphine in mice. The present study was performed to elucidate subcellular distribution and activity of OA-sensitive PPs in the brain when mice exposed to morphine. Subcutaneous administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) produced the antinociceptive effect with the maximum 30 min after its administration, evaluated by tail-pinch test. The antinociception was accompanied by an increment of activity in OA-sensitive PPs in the membrane fraction prepared from the whole brain of mice treated with morphine: The temporal profile of the morphine-induced increment of OA-sensitive PP activity was consistent with that of antinociceptive effects of morphine. The morphine-induced increase in OA-sensitive PP activity was dependent on the dose and attenuated by the concurrent administration of naloxone (1 mg/kg). To identify the subtype of OA-sensitive PPs in morphine-enhanced activity, we examined the level of PP2A and PP5, OA-sensitive PPs, in the subcellular fraction prepared from the whole brain of mice receiving morphine. Western blot revealed that morphine elicited the significant increase in the level of PP5, but not PP2A, in the membrane fraction, with the same peak time for the increment of PP5 as the antinociception. No significant change was observed in the level of OA-sensitive PPs in the cytosolic fraction at any examined time after morphine. These results suggest that the translocation of PP5 to the membrane fraction is, at least in part, involved in the antinociceptive effect of morphine in mice.
    Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 01/2010; 33(6):1011-4. · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mitogen-activated protein kinase family plays an important role in several types of pain. However, the detailed role of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) in the region of injured peripheral nerve is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether pERK in injured sciatic nerve contributes to neuropathic pain induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) in mice. Mice received PSL; pERK1/2 (p44/42) in sciatic nerve was measured by both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. U0126 (an ERK kinase inhibitor) was injected twice, an intraneural injection (20 nmol/2 microL) 30 min before PSL, and a perineural injection (20 nmol/10 microL) on Day 1 after PSL. Thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia induced by PSL were evaluated by the thermal paw withdrawal test and the von Frey test, respectively. As measured by Western blotting, in sham-operated mice, the levels of pERK1/2 in sciatic nerve were constant and the same as those in naive mice across Days 1-14. In PSL-operated mice, a significant increase in pERK1/2 was observed on Day 1 after PSL and persisted until Day 3. As measured by immunohistochemistry, immunoreactivity of pERK1/2 in PSL-operated sciatic nerve was markedly increased in comparison with that in sham-operated sciatic nerve on Day 1 after PSL. In the sciatic nerve on Day 1 after PSL, as indicated by double immunostaining, the increased immunoreactivity of pERK1/2 was colocalized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of Schwann cells, but not F4/80, a marker of macrophages. PSL-induced thermal hyperalgesia was significantly attenuated by treatment with U0126 on Days 3, 7, and 14 after PSL. The PSL-induced tactile allodynia was also significantly attenuated by treatment with U0126 on Days 7 and 14 after PSL. Activation of ERK in Schwann cells of the injured peripheral nervous system may play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that pERK itself and ERK-related mediators are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain.
    Anesthesia and analgesia 10/2009; 109(4):1305-11. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because chronic vincristine (VCR) treatment causes neuropathic pain, as demonstrated by mechanical allodynia, effective therapeutic strategy is required. In this study, we investigated a suppressive effect of imipramine (IMI) on VCR-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. VCR (0.1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) was administered once per day for 7 d in ICR male mice. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated by withdrawal response using von Frey filaments. In VCR-treated mice, mechanical allodynia was observed on day 3, 7, and 14. On day 14, morphine (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) slightly but significantly suppressed VCR-induced mechanical allodynia. The percent inhibition by morphine of VCR-induced mechanical allodynia was less than that of the lambda-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain and was similar to that of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Although single administration of IMI (30 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on VCR-induced mechanical allodynia, repeated administration of IMI (30 mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 d significantly suppressed VCR-induced mechanical allodynia. Suppressive effects by repeated IMI administration were observed in both early phase (day 0-6) and late phase (day 7-13) of VCR-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that chronic VCR administration induces opioid analgesics-resistant mechanical allodynia, and repeated IMI administration may be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of VCR-induced mechanical allodynia.
    Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 08/2009; 32(7):1231-4. · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nerve injury may result in neuropathic pain, characterized by allodynia and hyperalgesia. Accumulating evidence suggests the existence of a molecular substrate for neuropathic pain produced by neurons, glia, and immune cells. Here, we show that leptin, an adipokine exclusively produced by adipocytes, is critical for the development of tactile allodynia through macrophage activation in mice with partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). PSL increased leptin expression in adipocytes distributed at the epineurium of the injured sciatic nerve (SCN). Leptin-deficient animals, ob/ob mice, showed an absence of PSL-induced tactile allodynia, which was reversed by the administration of leptin to the injured SCN. Perineural injection of a neutralizing antibody against leptin reproduced this attenuation. Macrophages recruited to the perineurium of the SCN expressed the leptin receptor and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3), a transcription factor downstream of leptin. PSL also up-regulated the accepted mediators of neuropathic pain--namely, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and matrix metalloprotease-9--in the injured SCN, with transcriptional activation of their gene promoters by pSTAT3. This up-regulation was partly reproduced in a macrophage cell line treated with leptin. Administration of peritoneal macrophages treated with leptin to the injured SCN reversed the failure of ob/ob mice to develop PSL-induced tactile allodynia. We suggest that leptin induces recruited macrophages to produce pronociceptive mediators for the development of tactile allodynia. This report shows that adipocytes associated with primary afferent neurons may be involved in the development of neuropathic pain through adipokine secretion.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2009; 106(31):13076-81. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite accumulating evidence, the role of leptin in chemokine expression is poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the effects of leptin on CC-chemokine ligands (CCLs), CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 gene expression in cultured murine macrophage, J774A.1 cells. Expression of all these CCLs mRNA was gradually increased and significant up-regulation was observed for 3-12 h exposure to leptin (1 microM). The phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) was significantly increased for 5-20 min exposure to leptin, and it was localized in leptin receptor-positive macrophage. Pretreatment with AG490 (100 microM), a janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitor, significantly suppressed leptin-induced pSTAT3 increases and the up-regulation of CCLs mRNA expression. In conclusion, leptin enhances CCLs expression in cultured murine macrophage, through activation of a JAK2-STAT3 pathway. Therefore, a new paradigm of leptin-mediated chemokine expression may lead to the clarification of complex immune systems in future.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 06/2009; 384(3):311-5. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elucidation of the mechanism of neuropathic pain caused by vincristine is required because long-term treatment with this anticancer agent often causes neuropathic pain. We refer to the involvement of inflammatory mediators in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in this review. Several reports using rodents have shown that long-lasting neuropathic pain (mechanical allodynia) is caused by repeated systemic injection of vincristine. Vincristine damaged Schwann cells and DRG neurons in this model. Vincristine-induced macrophage infiltration in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and macrophage-derived IL-6 elicited mechanical allodynia. These findings proved that inhibition of IL-6 function prevented neuropathic pain caused by vincristine. In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord were demonstrated after long-term vincristine treatment. TNF-alpha was upregulated in activated microglia and astrocytes, and inhibition of TNF-alpha function attenuated neuropathic pain caused by vincristine. These results suggest that vincristine induces macrophage infiltration to the damaged PNS, and that macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 elicits neuroinflammation. Signal transduction of pain from the PNS to the CNS activates microglia and astrocytes, and these activated glial cells release inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha. In the CNS, these inflammatory cytokines have an important role in the neuropathic pain caused by vincristine. Immune-modulating agents that prevent activation of immune cells and/or the inhibitory agents of inflammatory cytokines could prevent the neuropathic pain caused by vincristine. These agents could increase the tolerability of vincristine when used for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma.
    International Review of Neurobiology 02/2009; 85:179-90. · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • Yohji Fukazawa, Takehiko Maeda, Shiroh Kishioka
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    ABSTRACT: Acupuncture is a therapeutic procedure that has been practiced for thousands of years in South East Asia to treat a variety of pathological symptoms and conditions. In 1997, the NIH released a consensus statement concluding that acupuncture is effective or at least useful for the treatment of 13 conditions including nausea and vomiting induced by surgery or chemotherapy, dental pain, and lower back pain. Although the beneficial aspects of acupuncture have been widely accepted, the mechanisms by which acupuncture acts are only partially understood. This review highlights the pharmacological mechanisms underlying the neurological (sensory), cardiovascular and gastrointestinal effects of electroacupuncture.
    Current opinion in investigational drugs (London, England: 2000) 02/2009; 10(1):62-9. · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • Takehiko Maeda, Shiroh Kishioka
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    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to a nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, containing three isoforms (alpha, beta/delta, and gamma). PPARs play a critical physiological role as a primary lipid sensor and regulator of lipid metabolism. Thus, its ligands are clinically used for treatment of type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. On the other hand, PPAR ligands exert the antineuroinflammatory activity through preventing upregulation of inflammatory mediators in animal models for neurodegenerative disease and autoimmune disease. Neuropathic pain and inflammatory pain, clinically important one, are chronically progressed and underlain by neuroinflammation. In a few years, some studies using experimental models emerge that administration of PPAR ligands reduces inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. PPAR ligands repress expression of genes for inflammatory mediators involved in both pains, such as proinflammatory cytokines, by a molecular mechanism termed ligand-dependent direct transrepression. Alternative mechanism is independent of transcriptional regulation of target genes, such as inhibition of activity of ion channels involved in the development of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, and therefore the analgesic effect occurs with rapid onset. The effects of PPAR ligands on neuroinflammation in animal models suggest their possible use for treating human inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain.
    International Review of Neurobiology 02/2009; 85:165-77. · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • Neuroscience Research - NEUROSCI RES. 01/2009; 65.
  • Takehiko Maeda, Shiroh Kishioka
    International Review of Neurobiology - INT REV NEUROBIOL. 01/2009; 85:165-177.
  • International Review of Neurobiology - INT REV NEUROBIOL. 01/2009; 85:179-190.

Publication Stats

428 Citations
102.09 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2013
    • Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences
      Niahi-niigata, Niigata, Japan
  • 2002–2012
    • Wakayama Medical University
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Wakayama, Wakayama, Japan