V Conte

Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Lombardy, Italy

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Publications (9)28.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The identification of risk factors associated with perioperative seizures would be of great benefit to the anesthesiologist in managing brain tumor patients undergoing craniotomy with intraoperative brain mapping.
    Minerva anestesiologica 07/2014; · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Critical Care 03/2013; 17(2). · 4.93 Impact Factor
  • Critical Care 03/2013; 17(2). · 4.93 Impact Factor
  • Critical Care 03/2013; 17(2). · 4.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is frequent, sometimes lethal, and may have life-long consequences in survivors. Prevention at school and in sports, including both kids and families, is of paramount importance. Scarce data are available in terms of epidemiology, physiopathology, management and prognosis. This non-systematic review suggests that rational organization of rescue and transport to designated hospitals, linked with early diagnosis/removal of surgical masses and comprehensive monitoring and intensive care, offer the best chances for reducing mortality and morbidity in severe cases. After the acute phase rehabilitation and families play a fundamental role.
    Minerva anestesiologica 12/2010; 76(12):1052-9. · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • Minerva anestesiologica 11/2008; 74(10):571-7. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intraoperative brain mapping has the goal of aiding with maximal surgical resection of brain tumors while minimizing functional sequelae. Retrospective randomized studies on large populations have shown that this technique can optimize the surgical approach while reducing postoperative morbidity. During direct electrical stimulation of the language areas adjacent to the tumor, the patient should be collaborative and be able to speak to participate in language testing. Different anesthesiological protocols have been proposed to allow intraoperative brain mapping, which range from local anesthesia to conscious sedation or general anesthesia, with or without airway instrumentation. The most common intraoperative complications are seizure, respiratory depression, and patients' stress and discomfort. Since awake craniotomy carries both benefits and potential risks, the following factors are crucial in the management of patients: 1) careful selection of the patients and 2) communication between the anesthesiological and surgical teams. To date, there remains no consensus about the optimal anesthesiological regimen to use. Only prospective, multicentre randomized studies focused on evaluating the role of different anesthesiological techniques on intraoperative monitoring, postoperative deficits, and intraoperative complications can answer the question of which anesthesiological approach should be chosen when intraoperative brain mapping is requested.
    Minerva anestesiologica 07/2008; 74(6):289-92. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the arterio-venous difference in carbon dioxide tension (DPCO2) and the ratio between DPCO2 and arterio-jugular oxygen difference (AJDO2) as indicators of compensated or uncompensated cerebral hypoperfusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was reduced stepwise in 6 pigs by inducing intracranial hypertension with consequently cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) reduction: CBF 100%, 50-60 % of baseline, 20-30% of baseline. Intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), CPP and CBF (laser-Doppler method) were continuously recorded. Superior sagittal sinus was punctured for the determination of AJDO2 and DPCO2. CBF impairment was accompanied by changes in AJDO2 from 6.03 +/- 1.21 vol% to 7.32 +/- 1.30 vol%, up to 8.07 +/- 1.32 vol% (P < 0.01), in DPCO2 from 12.17 +/- 3.25 mmHg to 16 +/- 4.12 mmHg, up to 26.5 +/- 6.41 mmHg (P < 0.01), and DPCO2/AJDO2 ratio from 2.05 +/- 0.39 to 2.06 +/- 0.72 up to 3.41 +/- 1.09 in the 3 phases (P < 0.05). When CBF declines AJDO2 increases, indicating greater extraction of O2 to satisfy aerobic metabolism. However, this mechanism can no longer compensate once a critical CBF threshold is reached. DPCO2 rises slowly during moderate CBF reduction because of defective washout; the rise is steeper during marked CBF impairment when anaerobic metabolism takes place. During cerebral hypoperfusion the venous blood gases and acid base variables mirror the degree of cerebral perfusion. In particular the DPCO2, and the DPCO2/ AJDO2 ratio may be useful markers of critical brain hypoperfusion.
    Minerva anestesiologica 07/2006; 72(6):543-9. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to assess the veno-arterial difference in pCO2 (delta pCO2) as an indicator of ischemia compared to the arteriovenous O2 difference (AVDO2). Staircase cerebral blood flow (CBF) reductions were obtained in seven domestic pigs by inducing intracranial hypertension: CBF 100%, 50-60% of baseline, 20-30% of baseline. ICP, MAP, CPP and CBF (Laser-Doppler method) were continuously recorded. The superior sagittal sinus was punctured to determine AVDO2 and delta pCO2. AVDO2 was 5.9 (+/- 1.78, range 3.3-7.4), 7.01 (+/- 1.31, range 5-8.9) and 8.17 (+/- 1.51, range 6.0-11.3) ml/100 ml in the three CBF steps (p = 0.001). CBF impairment was accompanied by the following increases in delta pCO2: from 10 (+/- 4, range 4-15) mmHg to 14.5 (+/- 4.11, range 10-27) mmHg, and to 31.2 (+/- 9.0, range 17-39) mmHg (p < 0.001). When CBF declines AVDO2 increases, indicating greater extraction of O2 to satisfy the aerobic metabolism. However, this mechanism can no longer compensate once a critical CBF threshold is reached. delta pCO2 rises slowly during moderate CBF reduction because of defective washout; the rise is impressive during marked CBF impairment when anaerobic metabolism takes place with proton buffering in CO2 and H2O. Therefore, when the brain's ability to compensate for low blood flow is exceeded, CO2 production outweighs O2 extraction.
    Acta neurochirurgica. Supplement 01/2002; 81:201-4.