M Karthaus

Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen, Wels, Upper Austria, Austria

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Publications (136)341.99 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Current evidence on myelopoietic growth factors is difficult to overview for the practicing haematologist/oncologist. International guidelines are sometimes conflicting, exclude certain patient groups, or cannot directly be applied to the German health system. This guideline by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Haematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) gives evidence-based recommendations for the use of G-CSF, pegylated G-CSF, and biosimilars to prevent infectious complications in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, including those with haematological malignancies. We systematically searched and evaluated current evidence. An expert panel discussed the results and recommendations. We then compared our recommendations to current international guidelines. We summarised the data from eligible studies in evidence tables, developed recommendations for different entities and risk groups. Comprehensive literature search and expert panel consensus confirmed many key recommendations given by international guidelines. Evidence for growth factors during acute myeloid leukaemia induction chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim use in haematological malignancies was rated lower compared with other guidelines.
    Annals of Oncology 03/2014; · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer patients are at increased risk for central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs). Thus, a comprehensive, practical and evidence-based guideline on CRI in patients with malignancies is warranted. A panel of experts by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) has developed a guideline on CRI in cancer patients. Literature searches of the PubMed, Medline and Cochrane databases were carried out and consensus discussions were held. Recommendations on diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients are made, and the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence are presented. This guideline is an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients.
    Annals of Oncology 01/2014; · 7.38 Impact Factor
  • Dieter Buchheidt, Meinolf Karthaus
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    ABSTRACT: Aspergillus infections are a threat in patients with hematological malignancies. Known risk factors are profound and long lasting neutropenia, uncontrolled graft versus host disease, continuous administration of steroids and environmental factors as hospital construction. Numerous efforts have been undertaken for prophylaxis of invasive aspergillosis in high-risk populations. Most of them failed to demonstrate survival advantages. Prophylaxis makes sense, since diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis remain difficult. The introduction of non-culture based tools for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis is an important step forward for early and sensitive diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. Early treatment is the cornerstones for a successful management of invasive aspergillosis. Substantial improvement came from with the introduction of lipid formulations of amphotericin B in the early 1990s. Voriconazole was the first azole that improved the overall survival for patients with invasive aspergillosis. Newer azoles and the echinocandins were introduced for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis since the late 1990s. Voriconazole and liposomal Amphotericin B Lipid allow a safer and more effective treatment of invasive aspergillosis when compared with amphotericin B-desoxycholate. Combination of antifungal agents has been introduced in clinical trials. Up to now no significant benefit has been obtained with antifungal combination compared to voriconazole alone. Because mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains up to more than 50%, prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungal therapy are of utmost importance for the reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Beside all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state and new insights in the management of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs.
    Current pharmaceutical design 12/2012; · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT) KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. METHODS: Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. RESULTS: 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59); most (98%) experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]). Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56%) compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%). Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78), health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0) and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7) were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion), respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. CONCLUSIONS: First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument-related toxicity.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT00508404.
    BMC Cancer 09/2012; 12(1):438. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: More than 18,000 autolgous transplantation were performed in Europe in the year 2009. It as a routine procedure in experienced centres. Even if there is a low mortality rate, infections are a major issue after transplantation, occurring in more than 60 % of the patients. In this review we discuss all aspects of infections after autologous stem transplantation, including epidemiology, diagnostics, therapeutic algorithms, prophylaxis and supportive therapy.
    Annals of Hematology 05/2012; 91(8):1161-74. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Panitumumab monotherapy is approved for KRAS wild-type (WT) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) progressing after standard chemotherapy. This study evaluated first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with mCRC. In this phase II, single-arm study, panitumumab (6 mg/kg) and FOLFIRI [irinotecan (180 mg/m(2)) and leucovorin (400 mg/m(2)) followed by a 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m(2) bolus and a 2,400-3,000 mg/m(2) continuous infusion] were administered every 14 days until progression. Data were analysed descriptively overall and by tumour KRAS status. KRAS data were available for 145/154 (94%) patients: 59% KRAS WT and 41% mutant (MT); mean follow-up was 39.5 versus 35.8 weeks, respectively. Objective responses occurred in 49% of patients: 56% versus 38% in the KRAS WT versus MT groups [(18% difference (95% CI 1-35%); odds ratio 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-4.4)]; median duration of response was 13.0 versus 7.4 months. More patients in the WT group underwent R0 resection (8% vs. 5%); median progression-free survival also favoured this group (8.9 vs. 7.2 months). The most common adverse events (any grade) were integument toxicities (98%), diarrhoea (79%) and stomatitis/oral mucositis (51%). As expected, consistently favourable efficacy was observed in patients with KRAS WT versus MT tumours receiving first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment.
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 09/2011; 138(1):65-72. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Establishing a definite diagnosis of IFI in immunocompromised patients is particularly challenging and time consuming, but delayed initiation of antifungal treatment increases mortality. The limited overall outcome has led to the strategy of initiating either 'empirical' or 'preemptive' antifungal therapy before the final diagnosis. However, diagnostic procedures have been vastly improved in recent years. Particularly noteworthy is the introduction of newer imaging techniques and non-culture methods, including antigen-based assays, metabolite detection and molecular detection of fungal DNA from body fluid samples. Though varying widely in cancer patients, the risk of IFI is highest in those with allogeneic stem cell transplantation and those with acute leukemia. The AGIHO presents recommendations for the diagnosis of IFIs with risk-adapted screening concepts for febrile episodes in patients with haemato-oncological disorders.
    Annals of Oncology 09/2011; 23(4):823-33. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose of caspofungin for invasive aspergillosis (IA). The safety and pharmacokinetics of escalating dosages of caspofungin were investigated in IA. Eight patients each received caspofungin 70, 100, 150, or 200 mg once a day (QD). Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as the same non-hematological treatment-related adverse event of grade ≥ 4 in 2 of 8 patients or ≥ 3 in 4 of 8 patients in a cohort. A total of 46 patients (median age, 61 years; 21 female; 89% with hematological malignancies) received caspofungin (9, 8, 9, and 20 patients in the 70-, 100-, 150-, and 200-mg cohorts) for a median of 24.5 days. Plasma pharmacokinetics were linear across the investigated dosages and followed a two-compartment model, with weight as the covariate on clearance and sex as the covariate on central volume of distribution. Simulated peak plasma concentrations at steady state ranged from 14.2 to 40.6 mg/liter (28%), trough concentrations from 4.1 to 11.8 mg/liter (58%), and area under the concentration-time curve from 175 to 500 mg/liter/h (32%) (geometric mean, geometric coefficient of variation). Treatment was well tolerated without dose-limiting toxicity. The rate of complete or partial responses was 54.3%, and the overall mortality at 12-week follow-up was 28.3%. In first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis, daily doses of up to 200 mg caspofungin were well tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics was linear. Response rates were similar to those previously reported for voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 09/2011; 55(12):5798-803. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    A Glöckner, M Karthaus
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    ABSTRACT: Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the intensive care unit (ICU), with Candida spp. in the forefront among the important pathogens. As recent studies have shown, survival outcome is strongly influenced by adequate antifungal therapy at an early stage that is often delayed by the time lag associated with microbiological diagnosis. Risk factor-based prediction models have a high negative predictive value, but positive prediction of candidaemia in the individual patient remains elusive. New antigen- or DNA-based methods for early diagnosis still await clinical validation. Their routine use is hampered by methodological issues. Species distribution of invasive Candida isolates in the ICU appears to be influenced primarily by age, previous hospitalisation and colonising species. In the context of the importance of adequate first-line treatment, recent guidelines favour the use of echinocandins in critically ill patients with symptoms evoking high suspicion of invasive candidiasis. This is supported by robust clinical trial data, a few interactions and low toxicity. Fluconazole is characterised by reduced activity against some important Candida species, elevated rates of persistent infection seen in comparative trials. Amphotericin B deoxycholate should be considered obsolete in ICU patients because of its high toxicity. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a rare devastating infection in the general ICU population, but some centres have reported elevated incidences and underdiagnosis as determined in autopsy-controlled studies. Treatment with mould-active agents such as voriconazole must be initiated early in patients with suspected IA.
    Mycoses 09/2011; 54(5):420-33. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Invasive Candida infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and hospitalised patients. This article provides the joint recommendations of the German-speaking Mycological Society (Deutschsprachige Mykologische Gesellschaft, DMyKG) and the Paul-Ehrlich-Society for Chemotherapy (PEG) for diagnosis and treatment of invasive and superficial Candida infections. The recommendations are based on published results of clinical trials, case-series and expert opinion using the evidence criteria set forth by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Key recommendations are summarised here: The cornerstone of diagnosis remains the detection of the organism by culture with identification of the isolate at the species level; in vitro susceptibility testing is mandatory for invasive isolates. Options for initial therapy of candidaemia and other invasive Candida infections in non-granulocytopenic patients include fluconazole or one of the three approved echinocandin compounds; liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole are secondary alternatives because of their less favourable pharmacological properties. In granulocytopenic patients, an echinocandin or liposomal amphotericin B is recommended as initial therapy based on the fungicidal mode of action. Indwelling central venous catheters serve as a main source of infection independent of the pathogenesis of candidaemia in the individual patients and should be removed whenever feasible. Pre-existing immunosuppressive treatment, particularly by glucocorticosteroids, ought to be discontinued, if feasible, or reduced. The duration of treatment for uncomplicated candidaemia is 14 days following the first negative blood culture and resolution of all associated symptoms and findings. Ophthalmoscopy is recommended prior to the discontinuation of antifungal chemotherapy to rule out endophthalmitis or chorioretinitis. Beyond these key recommendations, this article provides detailed recommendations for specific disease entities, for antifungal treatment in paediatric patients as well as a comprehensive discussion of epidemiology, clinical presentation and emerging diagnostic options of invasive and superficial Candida infections.
    Mycoses 07/2011; 54(4):279-310. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to identify unsolved issues in the management of invasive candidiasis, identify controversies and achieve consensus. The German Speaking Mycological Society (Deutschsprachige Mykologische Gesellschaft, DMykG e.V.) asked other German infectious diseases (ID) and mycological societies to submit unsolved issues concerning the diagnosis and treatment of fungal infections. Based on these contributions, a digital web-based questionnaire of 12 questions on Candida infections was designed to be completed by experts of the participating societies. Controversial results were identified by a mathematical model and were discussed at a consensus conference during the 43rd Annual Meeting of the DMykG e.V. in Cologne, Germany. Forty-two individuals completed the questionnaire. Analysis showed a strong consensus on treatment indications, choice of antifungals for clinical situations, handling of central venous catheters, duration of treatment and role of susceptibility testing. Opinions diverged on: initial treatment of haemodynamically stable neutropenic and haemodynamically unstable non-neutropenic patients, step down to oral treatment and the differential role of the echinocandins. These questions were presented for discussion at the expert consensus conference. In three of four questions, consensus was achieved. A two-step approach - web-based survey plus classical panel discussion - allows to capture expeditiously the opinions of a large and diverse group of individuals, to identify controversial issues and to resolve them in a personal, interactive setting. Thus, expert consensus was achieved on nine of 12 important questions on how to treat invasive candidiasis.
    Mycoses 05/2011; 54(5):e546-56. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    M Karthaus
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    ABSTRACT: Major progress for the management of invasive aspergillosis has come from the introduction of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Although mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains as high as 30-50%. Backbone of management are prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungals for reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Randomized trials have been undertaken for the prophylaxis as well as treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the last two decades. Posaconazole is recommended for prophylaxis against aspergillosis in patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or patients with graft versus host disease after allogeneic transplantation. Efficacy has been shown for first-line therapy of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B. Gastrointestinal resorption for the azoles posaconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole differ considerably. While oral voriconazole resportion is reduced when taken with food, posaconazole has to be taken with fatty food for optimal intestinal resorption. Beside all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state of prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs.
    European journal of medical research 04/2011; 16(4):145-52. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor treatment strategies, i.e. monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and panitumumab, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as erlotinib and gefitinib, have expanded the treatment options for different tumor types. Dermatologic toxic effects are the most common side-effects of EGFR inhibitor therapy. They can profoundly affect the patient's quality of life. Purpose: The aim of this study was to provide interdisciplinary expert recommendations on how to treat patients with skin reactions undergoing anti-EGFR treatment. Material and methods: An expert panel from Germany with expertise in medical oncology, dermatology or clinical pharmacology was convened to develop expert recommendations based on published peer-reviewed literature. The expert recommendations for the state-of-the-art treatment of skin reactions induced by EGFR inhibitor therapy include recommendations for diagnostics and grading as well as grade-specific and stage-adapted treatment approaches and preventive measures. It was concluded that EGFR-inhibitor-related dermatologic reactions should always be treated combining basic care of the skin and a specific therapy adapted to stage and grade of skin reaction. For grade 2 and above, specific treatment recommendations for early- and later-stage skin reactions induced by EGFR-inhibitor therapy were proposed. This paper presents a German national expert opinion for the treatment of skin reactions in patients receiving EGFR inhibitor therapy.
    Annals of Oncology 03/2011; 22(3):524-35. · 7.38 Impact Factor
  • Meinolf Karthaus, Marcus Hentrich
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    ABSTRACT: Infections are a major threat for patients with haematological malignancies after intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy. The severity and extent of neutropenia are considered a major risk factor for infections in these patients. Antibacterial treatment for patients with febrile neutropenia was standardised in the late 1990s with no further significant improvements within the last decade. Major progress in febrile neutropenia has come from the advent of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Lipid-based amphotericin B, third-generation azoles and the introduction of echinocandins allow a safer and effective treatment of invasive fungal infections. The mortality rate of invasive fungal infection is as high as 30-100% and a definitive diagnosis by culture may take too long. Thus, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungal therapy remain important for the reduction of mortality rates. In the last two decades, randomised trials on prophylaxis and empirical therapy of invasive fungal infections were undertaken. Both primary prophylaxis and empirical therapy of invasive fungal infection proved effective. However, important questions remain unanswered. This article points out the clinicians view on unmet needs for patients with suspected invasive fungal infections after a decade of well-designed randomised trials for prevention of invasive fungal infections. Should we wait and see what happens in febrile neutropenic patients on antifungal prophylaxis or under empirical treatment or should we rush and switch antifungal treatment?
    Mycoses 01/2011; 54 Suppl 1:1-6. · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Onkologie 01/2011; 34:302-303. · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • M Karthaus
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    ABSTRACT: Invasive fungus infections caused by aspergillus spp. occur most frequently in immunocompromised patients. A high infection-associated death rate of up to and over 50% is attributed even today to these fungi. The disease in humans is caused mainly by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger. Other species, for example, Aspergillus terreus or Aspergillus nidulans are quantitatively less prevalent. Evidence based treatment of invasive aspergillosis has become safer and more effective within the last ten years through the introduction of the new azoles and the echinocandines. Voriconazole has become the medication of choice for initial therapy. The efficacy of voriconazole is well documented, to include the treatment of disseminated infections of the central nervous system. Amphotericin B-desoxycholate is associated with definite side-effects in intravenous therapy. On the grounds of its substantial toxicity, the North American Infectious Disease Society's (IDSA) Guidelines of 2008 recommend amphotericin B-desoxycholate for regions with restricted resources only, which could be the case in underdeveloped countries. Liposomal amphotericin B in the daily standard dose of 3 mg/kg offers a rate of response similar to the one with voriconazole in the first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis. However, a direct comparison with voriconazole on the basis of randomized studies is not available. As a secondary therapeutic treatment, in case of failure or intolerance of the primary treatment, caspofungin, micafungin and posaconazole have recently been under study. Both the echinocandines and posaconazole have proven effective in daily clinical practise. In refractory cases of invasive aspergillosis a combination therapy has been employed clinically. The results of prospective comparative controlled studies on combination therapy versus monotherapy will not be available until after 2010.
    Mycoses 05/2010; 53 Suppl 1:36-43. · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • M. Karthaus
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    ABSTRACT: ZusammenfassungInvasive Pilzinfektionen durch Aspergillus spp. treten überwiegend bei gestörter Immunabwehr auf. Sie sind auch heute noch mit einer hohen infektionsassoziierten Sterblichkeit von bis zu über 50% behaftet. Erkrankungen werden beim Menschen hauptsächlich durch Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus und A. niger verursacht. Andere Spezies, z. B. A. terreus oder A. nidulans, spielen quantitativ eine untergeordnete Rolle. Die Primärtherapie der invasiven Aspergillose ist in den letzten zehn Jahren durch die Einführung neuer Azole und der Echinocandine effektiver und sicherer geworden. Für die Erstlinientherapie ist Voriconazol Mittel der Wahl. Die Effektivität von Voriconazol ist gut belegt, einschließlich disseminierter Infektionen bis zum Befall des ZNS. Amphotericin B-Desoxycholat weist deutliche Nebenwirkungen bei i.v. Therapie auf. Die nordamerikanische Infectious Disease Society (IDSA) Guideline von 2008 empfiehlt Amphotericin B-Desoxycholat aufgrund substantieller Toxizitäten nur noch für Regionen mit eingeschränkten Ressourcen, die in nicht entwickelten Ländern vorliegen können. Liposomales Amphotericin B in der Standarddosierung (3 mg/kg) weist ähnliche Ansprechraten wie Voriconazol in der Erstlinientherapie der invasiven Aspergillose auf. Allerdings fehlt ein direkter Vergleich mit Voriconazol aus randomisierten Studien. In der Zweitlinientherapie nach Versagen oder Intoleranz der Primärtherapie wurden in den letzten Jahren Caspofungin, Micafungin und Posaconazol untersucht. Kombinationstherapien werden bei refraktären Fällen einer invasiven Aspergillose im klinischen Alltag eingesetzt. Ergebnisse aus vergleichenden prospektiven kontrollierten Studien einer Kombinationstherapie gegenüber einer Monotherapie werden erst nach 2010 zu erwarten sein.SummaryInvasive fungus infections caused by aspergillus spp. occur most frequently in immunocompromised patients. A high infection-associated death rate of up to and over 50% is attributed even today to these fungi. The disease in humans is caused mainly by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger. Other species, for example, Aspergillus terreus or Aspergillus nidulans are quantitatively less prevalent. Evidence based treatment of invasive aspergillosis has become safer and more effective within the last ten years through the introduction of the new azoles and the echinocandines. Voriconazole has become the medication of choice for initial therapy. The efficacy of voriconazole is well documented, to include the treatment of disseminated infections of the central nervous system. Amphotericin B-desoxycholate is associated with definite side-effects in intravenous therapy. On the grounds of its substantial toxicity, the North American Infectious Disease Society’s (IDSA) Guidelines of 2008 recommend amphotericin B-desoxycholate for regions with restricted resources only, which could be the case in underdeveloped countries. Liposomal amphotericin B in the daily standard dose of 3 mg/kg offers a rate of response similar to the one with voriconazole in the first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis. However, a direct comparison with voriconazole on the basis of randomized studies is not available. As a secondary therapeutic treatment, in case of failure or intolerance of the primary treatment, caspofungin, micafungin and posaconazole have recently been under study. Both the echinocandines and posaconazole have proven effective in daily clinical practise. In refractory cases of invasive aspergillosis a combination therapy has been employed clinically. The results of prospective comparative controlled studies on combination therapy versus monotherapy will not be available until after 2010.
    Mycoses 02/2010; 53(s1):36 - 43. · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Infectious Diseases - INT J INFECT DIS. 01/2010; 14.
  • Blood 01/2010; 116(21):953-953. · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • Annals of Oncology 09/2009; 20(11):1900-1. · 7.38 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
341.99 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen
      Wels, Upper Austria, Austria
  • 2010–2012
    • Städtischen Klinikum München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2011
    • University Hospital Frankfurt
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
    • Städtisches Klinikum Solingen Gmbh
      Solingen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Klinikum Oldenburg
      Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2009
    • Universitätsklinikum Erlangen
      Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2001–2009
    • University of Cologne
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Division of Haematology, Immunology, Infectiology, Intensive Care and Oncology
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2001–2006
    • Evangelic Hospital Bielefeld
      Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1996–2005
    • Hannover Medical School
      • Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine
      Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2004
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      • III. Department of Medicine
      Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
  • 2003
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1999–2003
    • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
      • Zentrum der Inneren Medizin
      Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany
  • 2000–2001
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      • Abteilung für Allgemeine Innere Medizin
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Universität Heidelberg
      • Medical University Clinic and Polyclinic
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
      Gieben, Hesse, Germany
    • University Hospital Essen
      Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany