Rodolpho M Albano

Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Publications (71)190.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: ExoU is an important virulence factor in acute P seudomonas aeruginosa infections. Here, we unveiled the mechanisms of ExoU‐driven NF‐κB activation by using human airway cells and mice infected with P . aeruginosa strains. Several approaches showed that PAFR was crucially implicated in the activation of the canonical NF‐κB pathway. Confocal microscopy of lungs from infected mice revealed that PAFR‐dependent NF‐κB activation occurred mainly in respiratory epithelial cells, and reduced p65 nuclear translocation was detected in mice PAFR−/− or treated with the PAFR antagonist WEB 2086. Several evidences showed that ExoU‐induced NF‐κB activation regulated PAFR expression. First, ExoU increased p65 occupation of PAFR promoter, as assessed by ChIP. Second, luciferase assays in cultures transfected with different plasmid constructs revealed that ExoU promoted p65 binding to the three κB sites in PAFR promoter. Third, treatment of cell cultures with the NF‐κB inhibitor Bay 11–7082, or transfection with IκBα negative‐dominant, significantly decreased PAFR mRNA. Finally, reduction in PAFR expression was observed in mice treated with Bay 11–7082 or WEB 2086 prior to infection. Together, our data demonstrate that ExoU activates NF‐κB by PAFR signalling, which in turns enhances PAFR expression, highlighting an important mechanism of amplification of response to this P . aeruginosa toxin.
    Cellular Microbiology 08/2014; 16(8). · 4.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Not applicable.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 01/2014; · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multidrug resistance is a critical factor in tuberculosis control. To gain better understanding of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Brazil, a retrospective study was performed to compare genotypic diversity and drug resistance associated mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a national reference center.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(8):e104100. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 07/2013; · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cockroaches are insects that can accommodate diets of different composition, including lignocellulosic materials. Digestion of these compounds is achieved by the insect's own enzymes and also by enzymes produced by gut symbionts. The presence of different and modular bacterial phyla on the cockroach gut tract suggests that this insect could be an interesting model to study the organization of gut bacterial communities associated with the digestion of different lignocellulosic diets. Thus, changes in the diversity of gut associated bacterial communities of insects exposed to such diets could give useful insights on how to improve hemicellulose and cellulose breakdown systems. In this work, through sequence analysis of 16S rRNA clone libraries, we compared the phylogenetic diversity and composition of gut associated bacteria in the cockroach Periplaneta americana collected in the wild-types or kept on two different diets: sugarcane bagasse and crystalline cellulose. These high fiber diets favor the predominance of some bacterial phyla, such as Firmicutes, when compared to wild-types cockroaches. Our data show a high bacterial diversity in P. americana gut, with communities composed mostly by the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Synergistetes. Our data show that the composition and diversity of gut bacterial communities could be modulated by diet composition. The increased presence of Firmicutes in sugarcane bagasse and crystalline cellulose-fed animals suggests that these bacteria are strongly involved in lignocellulose digestion in cockroach guts. Cockroaches are omnivorous animals that can incorporate in their diets food of different composition, including lignocellulosic materials. Digestion of these compounds is achieved by the insect's own enzymes and also by enzymes produced by gut symbiont. However, the influence of diet with different fiber contents on gut bacterial communities and how this affects the digestion of cockroaches is still unclear. The presence of some bacterial phyla on gut tract suggests that cockroaches could be an interesting model to study the organization of gut bacterial communities during digestion of different lignocellulosic diets. Knowledge about the changes in diversity of gut associated bacterial communities of insects exposed to such diets could give interesting insights on how to improve hemicellulose and cellulose breakdown systems. We compared the phylogenetic diversity and composition of gut associated bacteria in the cockroach P. americana caught on the wild or kept on two different diets: sugarcane bagasse and crystalline cellulose. For this purpose we constructed bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries which showed that a diet rich in cellulose and sugarcane bagasse favors the predominance of some bacterial phyla, more remarkably Firmicutes, when compared to wild cockroaches. Rarefaction analysis, LIBSHUFF and UniFrac PCA comparisons showed that gene libraries of wild insects were the most diverse, followed by sugarcane bagasse fed and then cellulose fed animals. It is also noteworthy that cellulose and sugarcane bagasse gene libraries resemble each other. Our data show a high bacterial diversity in P. americana gut, with communities composed mostly by the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Synergistetes. The composition and diversity of gut bacterial communities could be modulated by font of diet composition. The increased presence of Firmicutes in sugarcane bagasse and crystalline cellulose-fed animals suggests that these bacteria are strongly involved in lignocellulose digestion in cockroach guts.
    SpringerPlus 01/2013; 2:609.
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    ABSTRACT: The Archaea domain is ubiquitously distributed and extremely diverse, however, environmental factors that shape archaeal community structure are not well known. Aquatic environments, including the water column and sediments harbor many new uncultured archaeal species from which metabolic and ecological roles remain elusive. Some environments are especially neglected in terms of archaeal diversity, as is the case of pristine tropical areas. Here we investigate the archaeal composition in marine and freshwater systems from Ilha Grande, a South Atlantic tropical environment. All sampled habitats showed high archaeal diversity. No OTUs were shared between freshwater, marine and mangrove sediment samples, yet these environments are interconnected and geographically close, indicating environment-specific community structuring. Group II Euryarchaeota was the main clade in marine samples, while the new putative phylum Thaumarchaeota and LDS/RCV Euryarchaeota dominated freshwaters. Group III Euryarchaeota, a rare clade, was also retrieved in reasonable abundance in marine samples. The archaeal community from mangrove sediments was composed mainly by members of mesophilic Crenarchaeota and by a distinct clade forming a sister-group to Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. Our results show strong environment-specific community structuring in tropical aquatic Archaea, as previously seen for Bacteria.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(9):e76321. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Plant derived compounds have been shown to be important sources of several anti-cancer agents. As cell cycle deregulation and tumor growth are intimately linked, the discovery of new substances targeting events in this biochemical pathway would be of great value. The anti-leukemic effect of an ethanolic extract of Pterodon pubescens seeds (EEPp) has been previously demonstrated and now we show that a terpenic subfraction (SF5) of EEPp containing farnesol, geranylgeraniol and vouacapan derivatives induces apoptosis in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. This work addresses SF5's antiproliferative mechanisms in these cells since they are still unclear. METHODS: DNA synthesis in K562 cells was assessed by [3H]-methyl-thymidine incorporation and cell cycle status by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclins D1 and E2, of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 and of the proto-oncogene c-myc was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation was evaluated by western blotting. RESULTS: In K562 cells, SF5 treatment induced a higher inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell growth than the original EEPp hexanic fraction from which SF5 originated, and also arrested the cell cycle in G1. Exposure of these cells to SF5 led to a decrease in cyclin E2 and c-myc expression while p21 mRNA levels were increased. Furthermore, SF5 inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK 1/2 and NF-kappaB. CONCLUSIONS: This work suggests that the anti-leukemic action of SF5 is linked to the inhibition of ERKs, NF-kappaB and c-myc signaling pathways resulting in reduced cyclin E2 mRNA expression and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 11/2012; 12(1):231. · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • Vagner Bernardo, Luis Felipe Ribeiro Pinto, Rodolpho Mattos Albano
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    ABSTRACT: Reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is the gold standard for quantifying gene expression. However, because of PCR detection limits, theorized to be three template copies, the quantitation of genes exhibiting great expression variability is challenging. Using genes with high to low expression in rat tissues we experimentally demonstrated this limit and found it to be applicable only for describing reactions in which stochastic events and the Monte Carlo effect are present. We also determined the lower limits of RNA input that should be used to prevent artifactual template quantitation and we propose a methodology to assess RT-qPCR detection limits in any qPCR platform.
    Analytical Biochemistry 09/2012; · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Termites inhabit tropical and subtropical areas where they contribute to structure and composition of soils by efficiently degrading biomass with aid of resident gut microbiota. In this study, culture-independent molecular analysis was performed based on bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries to describe the gut microbial communities within Cornitermes cumulans, a South American litter-feeding termite. Our data reveal extensive bacterial diversity, mainly composed of organisms from the phyla Spirochaetes, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Fibrobacteres. In contrast, a low diversity of archaeal 16S rRNA sequences was found, comprising mainly members of the Crenarchaeota phylum. The diversity of archaeal methanogens was further analyzed by sequencing clones from a library for the mcrA gene, which encodes the enzyme methyl coenzyme reductase, responsible for catalyzing the last step in methane production, methane being an important greenhouse gas. The mcrA sequences were diverse and divided phylogenetically into three clades related to uncultured environmental archaea and methanogens found in different termite species. C. cumulans is a litter-feeding, mound-building termite considered a keystone species in natural ecosystems and also a pest in agriculture. Here, we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities within this termite, revealing for the first time its intriguing microbiota.
    Microbial Ecology 09/2012; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association of metazoan, protist, and microbial communities with Scleractinian corals forms the basis of the coral holobiont. Coral bleaching events have been occurring around the world, introducing changes in the delicate balance of the holobiont symbiotic interactions. In this study, Archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotic phototrophic plastids of bleached colonies of the Brazilian coral Siderastrea stellata were analyzed for the first time, using 16S rRNA gene libraries. Prokaryotic communities were slightly more diverse in healthy than in bleached corals. However, the eukaryotic phototrophic plastids community was more diverse in bleached corals. Archaea phylogenetic analyses revealed a high percentage of Crenarchaeota sequences, mainly related to Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. Dramatic changes in bacterial community composition were observed in this bleaching episode. The dominant bacterial group was Alphaproteobacteria followed by Gammaproteobacteria in bleached and Betaproteobacteria in healthy samples. Plastid operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from both coral samples were mainly related to red algae chloroplasts (Florideophycea), but we also observed some OTUs related to green algae chloroplasts (Chlorophyta). There seems to be a strong relationship between the Bacillariophyta phylum and our bleached coral samples as clones related to members of the diatom genera Amphora and Nitzschia were detected. The present study reveals information from a poorly investigated coral species and improves the knowledge of coral microbial community shifts that could occur during bleaching episodes.
    Microbial Ecology 08/2012; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    02/2012; , ISBN: 978-953-307-962-2
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    ABSTRACT: The invasive land snail Achatina fulica is one of the most damaging agricultural pests worldwide representing a potentially serious threat to natural ecosystems and human health. This species is known to carry parasites and harbors a dense and metabolically active microbial community; however, little is known about its diversity and composition. Here, we assessed for the first time the complexity of bacterial communities occurring in the digestive tracts of field-collected snails (FC) by using culture-independent molecular analysis. Crop and intestinal bacteria in FC were then compared to those from groups of snails that were reared in the laboratory (RL) on a sugarcane-based diet. Most of the sequences recovered were novel and related to those reported for herbivorous gut. Changes in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were observed when the snails were fed a high-sugar diet, suggesting that the snail gut microbiota can influence the energy balance equation. Furthermore, this study represents a first step in gaining a better understanding of land snail gut microbiota and shows that this is a complex holobiont system containing diverse, abundant and active microbial communities.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(3):e33440. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that genes involved in the reproductive biology of insect disease vectors are potential targets for future alternative methods of control. Little is known about the molecular biology of reproduction in phlebotomine sand flies and there is no information available concerning genes that are expressed in male reproductive organs of Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of American visceral leishmaniasis and a species complex. We generated 2678 high quality ESTs ("Expressed Sequence Tags") of L. longipalpis male reproductive organs that were grouped in 1391 non-redundant sequences (1136 singlets and 255 clusters). BLAST analysis revealed that only 57% of these sequences share similarity with a L. longipalpis female EST database. Although no more than 36% of the non-redundant sequences showed similarity to protein sequences deposited in databases, more than half of them presented the best-match hits with mosquito genes. Gene ontology analysis identified subsets of genes involved in biological processes such as protein biosynthesis and DNA replication, which are probably associated with spermatogenesis. A number of non-redundant sequences were also identified as putative male reproductive gland proteins (mRGPs), also known as male accessory gland protein genes (Acps). The transcriptome analysis of L. longipalpis male reproductive organs is one step further in the study of the molecular basis of the reproductive biology of this important species complex. It has allowed the identification of genes potentially involved in spermatogenesis as well as putative mRGPs sequences, which have been studied in many insect species because of their effects on female post-mating behavior and physiology and their potential role in sexual selection and speciation. These data open a number of new avenues for further research in the molecular and evolutionary reproductive biology of sand flies.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(4):e34495. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite a great number of published studies addressing estuarine, freshwater and marine bacterial diversity, few have examined urban coastal lagoons in tropical habitats. There is an increasing interest in monitoring opportunistic pathogens as well as indigenous microbial community members in these water bodies by current molecular and microbiological approaches. In this work, bacterial isolates were obtained through selective plate dilution methods to evaluate antibiotic resistances. In addition, 16S rRNA gene libraries were prepared from environmental waters and mixed cultures grown in BHI medium inoculated with Jacarepaguá lagoon waters. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses showed distinct community profiles between environmental communities from each studied site and their cultured counterparts. A total of 497 bacterial sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 245 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) grouped at 97% similarity. CCA diagrams showcased how several environmental variables affect the distribution of 18 bacterial orders throughout the three distinct habitats. UniFrac metrics and Venn diagrams revealed that bacterial communities retrieved through each experimental approach were significantly different and that only one OTU, closely related to Vibrio cholerae, was shared between them. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from most sampled environments, fifty percent of which showed antibiotic resistance.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(11):e51175. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the large number of reports describing sponge-microbe associations, limited knowledge is available about associated fungi and their relationships with the hosts. In this work, specific fungal strains were obtained directly from in vitro sponge cell cultures (primmorphs) and single sponge cells (cytospins) and compared with those obtained from whole tissue preparations. A total of 27 fungal strains were isolated from the marine sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila and Haliclona melana. Fifteen strains, nine from H. heliophila and six from H. melana, were obtained from whole tissue and were considered as possible mesohyl associated or transient fungi. Twelve strains were isolated from in vitro sponge cell cultures (primmorphs) and were, therefore, considered as cell associated. From these, five different strains were obtained from H. heliophila isolated cells, while five were identified from cytospins and two from primmorphs of H. melana. The fungal strains obtained from cell cultures from both sponge species were different, and none of them were detected in the whole tissue preparations of the same species. Nine H. heliophila and seven H. melana strains shows low similarity with the sequences available in public databases and belong to potentially new species. This is the first report of fungi isolated directly from sponge cells, which allowed the observation and selection of specific strains that probably would not be obtained by usual culture dependent techniques.
    Brazilian Journal of Microbiology 10/2011; 42(4):1560-8. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the possibility of cross-infection among cystic fibrosis patients in two Brazilian reference centers. Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates (n = 122) were recovered over a 5-year period from 39 patients. Isolates were genetically heterogeneous, but one genotype was present in 56% of the patients, suggesting that cross-infection may have occurred.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 08/2011; 49(10):3649-51. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is highly fatal due to late diagnosis and inefficient treatment. Early disease detection could improve diagnosis and patient survival. Esophageal squamous epithelial cells express SPRR3, a member of the small proline-rich protein family, which is downregulated in ESCC. Therefore, SPRR3 expression may be used as a biomarker to follow the transition from healthy mucosa to ESCC. Both SPRR3 mRNA splice variants, v1 and v2, were evaluated by real time PCR in tumor and histologically normal adjacent tissue biopsies from 84 ESCC patients and 18 healthy controls. SPRR3-v1 was most highly expressed in the esophageal mucosa of healthy subjects, with an increasingly lower expression in the adjacent mucosa of ESCC patients and in tumors, respectively. SPRR3-v2 expression was low in normal mucosa and in tumors but it was higher in the adjacent mucosa of ESCC patients. In addition, we found a significant correlation between a lower SPRR3-v1 and SPRR3-v2 expression and age and alcohol consumption, respectively. SPRR3 protein expression presented a good correlation with SPRR3 mRNA expression. Cut-off points to discriminate between healthy mucosa, tumor and adjacent mucosa were determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. This analysis showed that SPRR3-v1 expression discriminates the esophageal mucosa of healthy subjects from the adjacent mucosa and the tumor of ESCC patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our data shows that the quantitative analysis of SPRR3 mRNA is a robust and reliable method to monitor the malignant transformation of the healthy esophageal mucosa into ESCC.
    Experimental and Molecular Pathology 07/2011; 91(2):584-9. · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis was carried out to study for the first time the diversity of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) and nitrogenase reductase subunit H (nifH) genes from Urca inlet at Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Most bacterial amoA and nifH sequences exhibited identities of less than 95% to those in the GenBank database revealing that novel ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrogen-fixing microorganisms may exist in this tropical marine environment. The observation of a large number of clones related to uncultured bacteria also indicates the necessity to describe these microorganisms and to develop new cultivation methodologies.
    Molecular Biology Reports 06/2011; 39(4):3401-7. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Planktonic bacteria are recognized as important drivers of biogeochemical processes in all aquatic ecosystems, however, the taxa that make up these communities are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate bacterial communities in aquatic ecosystems at Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, a preserved insular environment of the Atlantic rain forest and how they correlate with a salinity gradient going from terrestrial aquatic habitats to the coastal Atlantic Ocean. We analyzed chemical and microbiological parameters of water samples and constructed 16S rRNA gene libraries of free living bacteria obtained at three marine (two coastal and one offshore) and three freshwater (water spring, river, and mangrove) environments. A total of 836 sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 269 freshwater and 219 marine operational taxonomic units (OTUs) grouped at 97% stringency. Richness and diversity indexes indicated that freshwater environments were the most diverse, especially the water spring. The main bacterial group in freshwater environments was Betaproteobacteria (43.5%), whereas Cyanobacteria (30.5%), Alphaproteobacteria (25.5%), and Gammaproteobacteria (26.3%) dominated the marine ones. Venn diagram showed no overlap between marine and freshwater OTUs at 97% stringency. LIBSHUFF statistics and PCA analysis revealed marked differences between the freshwater and marine libraries suggesting the importance of salinity as a driver of community composition in this habitat. The phylogenetic analysis of marine and freshwater libraries showed that the differences in community composition are consistent. Our data supports the notion that a divergent evolutionary scenario is driving community composition in the studied habitats. This work also improves the comprehension of microbial community dynamics in tropical waters and how they are structured in relation to physicochemical parameters. Furthermore, this paper reveals for the first time the pristine bacterioplankton communities in a tropical island at the South Atlantic Ocean.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(3):e17789. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacteria producing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) are rapidly emerging as a cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. KPCs enzyme are plasmid-borne and can accumulate and transfer resistance determinants to other classes of antibiotics.We report two cases of KPC-2 carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Cystic Fibrosis patients.
    Journal of cystic fibrosis: official journal of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society 01/2011; 10(2):140-2. · 3.19 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

644 Citations
190.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Rio de Janeiro State University
      • • Departamento de Bioquímica (DBq)
      • • Faculdade de Ciências Médicas (FCM)
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2012
    • National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro)
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • Brazilian National Cancer Institute
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 1983–2012
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
      • • Institute of Medical Biochemistry
      • • Departamento de Biologia Marinha (BIOMAR)
      • • Departamento de Engenharia Bioquímica
      • • Departamento de Bioquímica
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2011
    • Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil