Sébastien Praud

Biogemma, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (11)36.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: By comparing 195 varieties in eight trials, this study assesses nitrogen use efficiency improvement in high and low nitrogen conditions in European winter wheat over the last 25 years. In a context where European agriculture practices have to deal with environmental concerns and nitrogen (N) fertiliser cost, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) has to be improved. This study assessed genetic progress in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) NUE. Two hundred and twenty-five European elite varieties were tested in four environments under two levels of N. Global genetic progress was assessed on additive genetic values and on genotype × N interaction, covering 25 years of European breeding. To avoid sampling bias, quality, precocity and plant height were added as covariates in the analyses when needed. Genotype × environment interactions were highly significant for all the traits studied to such an extent that no additive genetic effect was detected on N uptake. Genotype × N interactions were significant for yield, grain protein content (GPC), N concentration in straw, N utilisation, and NUE. Grain yield improvement (+0.45 % year(-1)) was independent of the N treatment. GPC was stable, thus grain nitrogen yield was improved (+0.39 % year(-1)). Genetic progress on N harvest index (+0.12 % year(-1)) and on N concentration in straw (-0.52 % year(-1)) possibly revealed improvement in N remobilisation. There has been an improvement of NUE additive genetic value (+0.33 % year(-1)) linked to better N utilisation (+0.20 % year(-1)). Improved yield stability was detected as a significant improvement of NUE in low compared to high N conditions. The application of these results to breeding programs is discussed.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 09/2013; · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genomic resources of small grain cereals that include some of the most important crop species such as wheat, barley, and rye are attaining a level of completion that now is contributing to new structural and functional studies as well as refining molecular marker development and mapping strategies for increasing the efficiency of breeding processes. The integration of new efforts to obtain reference sequences in bread wheat and barley, in particular, is accelerating the acquisition and interpretation of genome-level analyses in both of these major crops.
    Functional & Integrative Genomics 11/2012; · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The modification of flowering date is considered an important way to escape the current or future climatic constraints that affect wheat crops. A better understanding of its genetic bases would enable a more efficient and rapid modification through breeding. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with earliness in wheat. A 227-wheat core collection chosen to be highly contrasted for earliness was characterized for heading date. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions and in the field for 3 years to break down earliness in the component traits: photoperiod sensitivity, vernalization requirement and narrow-sense earliness. Whole-genome association mapping was carried out using 760 molecular markers and taking into account the five ancestral group structure. We identified 62 markers individually associated to earliness components corresponding to 33 chromosomal regions. In addition, we identified 15 other significant markers and seven more regions by testing marker pair interactions. Co-localizations were observed with the Ppd-1, Vrn-1 and Rht-1 candidate genes. Using an independent set of lines to validate the model built for heading date, we were able to explain 34% of the variation using the structure and the significant markers. Results were compared with already published data using bi-parental populations giving an insight into the genetic architecture of flowering time in wheat.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 11/2011; 124(3):597-611. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: During the last decades, with the intensification of selection and breeding using crosses between varieties, a very complex genetic structure was shaped in the elite wheat germplasm. However, precise description of this structure with panels and collections is becoming more and more crucial with the development of resource management and new statistical tools for mapping genetic determinants (e.g. association studies). In this study, we investigated the genetic structure of 195 Western European elite wheat varieties using the recent development of high throughput screening methods for molecular markers. After observing that both microsatellites and Diversity Array Technology markers are efficient to estimate the structure of the panel, we used different complementary approaches (Genetic distances, principal component analysis) that showed that the varieties are separated by geographical origin (France, Germany and UK) and also by breeding history, confirming the impact of plant breeding on the wheat germplasm structure. Moreover, by analysing three phenotypic traits presenting significant average differences across groups (plant height, heading date and awnedness), and by using markers linked to major genes for these traits (Ppd-D1, Rht-B1, Rht-D1 and B1), we showed that for each trait, there is a specific optimal Q matrix to use as a covariate in association tests.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 06/2011; 123(5):715-27. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Association mapping of sequence polymorphisms underlying the phenotypic variability of quantitative agronomical traits is now a widely used method in plant genetics. However, due to the common presence of a complex genetic structure within the plant diversity panels, spurious associations are expected to be highly frequent. Several methods have thus been suggested to control for panel structure. They mainly rely on ad hoc criteria for selecting the number of ancestral groups; which is often not evident for the complex panels that are commonly used in maize. It was thus necessary to evaluate the effect of the selected structure models on the association mapping results. A real maize data set (342 maize inbred lines and 12,000 SNPs) was used for this study. The panel structure was estimated using both Bayesian and dimensional reduction methods, considering an increasing number of ancestral groups. Effect on association tests depends in particular on the number of ancestral groups and on the trait analyzed. The results also show that using a high number of ancestral groups leads to an over-corrected model in which all causal loci vanish. Finally the results of all models tested were combined in a meta-analysis approach. In this way, robust associations were highlighted for each analyzed trait.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 01/2011; 122(6):1149-60. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) disease on wheat which can lead to trichothecene mycotoxin (e.g. deoxynivalenol, DON) contamination of grain, harmful to mammalian health. DON is produced at low levels under standard culture conditions when compared to plant infection but specific polyamines (e.g. putrescine and agmatine) and amino acids (e.g. arginine and ornithine) are potent inducers of DON by F. graminearum in axenic culture. Currently, host factors that promote mycotoxin synthesis during FHB are unknown, but plant derived polyamines could contribute to DON induction in infected heads. However, the temporal and spatial accumulation of polyamines and amino acids in relation to that of DON has not been studied. Following inoculation of susceptible wheat heads by F. graminearum, DON accumulation was detected at two days after inoculation. The accumulation of putrescine was detected as early as one day following inoculation while arginine and cadaverine were also produced at three and four days post-inoculation. Transcripts of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two key biosynthetic enzymes for putrescine biosynthesis, were also strongly induced in heads at two days after inoculation. These results indicated that elicitation of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway is an early response to FHB. Transcripts for genes encoding enzymes acting upstream in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway as well as those of ODC and ADC, and putrescine levels were also induced in the rachis, a flower organ supporting DON production and an important route for pathogen colonisation during FHB. A survey of 24 wheat genotypes with varying responses to FHB showed putrescine induction is a general response to inoculation and no correlation was observed between the accumulation of putrescine and infection or DON accumulation. The activation of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway and putrescine in infected heads prior to detectable DON accumulation is consistent with a model where the pathogen exploits the generic host stress response of polyamine synthesis as a cue for production of trichothecene mycotoxins during FHB disease. However, it is likely that this mechanism is complicated by other factors contributing to resistance and susceptibility in diverse wheat genetic backgrounds.
    BMC Plant Biology 01/2010; 10:289. · 4.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent updates in comparative genomics among cereals have provided the opportunity to identify conserved orthologous set (COS) DNA sequences for cross-genome map-based cloning of candidate genes underpinning quantitative traits. New tools are described that are applicable to any cereal genome of interest, namely, alignment criterion for orthologous couples identification, as well as the Intron Spanning Marker software to automatically select intron-spanning primer pairs. In order to test the software, it was applied to the bread wheat genome, and 695 COS markers were assigned to 1,535 wheat loci (on average one marker/2.6 cM) based on 827 robust rice-wheat orthologs. Furthermore, 31 of the 695 COS markers were selected to fine map a pentosan viscosity quantitative trait loci (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7A. Among the 31 COS markers, 14 (45%) were polymorphic between the parental lines and 12 were mapped within the QTL confidence interval with one marker every 0.6 cM defining candidate genes among the rice orthologous region.
    Functional & Integrative Genomics 08/2009; 9(4):473-84. · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute an abundant source of DNA polymorphisms, which have been successfully used to identify loci that are associated with a particular phenotype. Additionally, such markers could be efficiently used in combination with doubled haploid technology to improve the efficiency of breeding programmes. Information on such markers in plants is still scarce. For bread wheat, SNP data are restricted to a few genes. This can be explained by the hexaploidy of Triticum aestivum which makes SNP discovery difficult. We developed a novel method for SNP discovery in bread wheat. The strategy is based on the development of highly specific PCR-primers, which were used to sequence 27 lines. SNPs were discovered from sequence alignment data. Some SNPs were identified by mass spectrometry in a collection of 113 lines, which were both evaluated for agronomic traits and genotyped at 42 neutral microsatellite loci. Traits investigated include: protein content, the quantity of high-molecular-weight glutenins and that of the GluBx subunit. The 42 markers were used to infer population structure, which was included in linear models for association studies. The results of this preliminary study showed 89 SNPs in approximately 20kbp, i.e., one SNP every 223bp on average. Six SNPs were genotyped: three were located along the sequence of Glu-B1-1, while three non-synonymous SNPs were located along the sequence of the B homoeologous gene coding for SPA (Storage Protein Activator). The SNPs from Glu-B1-1 had a significant effect on the studied variables, whereas those of SPA had no effect. Such results might indicate that some haplotypes for Glu-B1-1 are linked to higher protein content, through an increased amount of high-molecular-weight glutenins, especially the GluBx subunit.
    Euphytica 11/2007; 158(3):331-336. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wheat prolamin-box binding factor (WPBF) was shown to be an activator of Triticum aestivum L. storage protein genes. Three homoeologous genes encoding this transcription factor were isolated from a bacterial artificial chromosome genomic library and sequenced. The genes all have two exons separated by an intron of approximately 1,000 bp where the second exon contains the entire coding sequence. Many differences were found between homoeologous sequences, but none of them is predicted to significantly alter the sequence of the putative encoded protein. The three homoeologous genes are specifically expressed in grain from 3 to 39 days after anthesis. The allelic variation of a genetically diverse collection of 27 bread wheat lines was assessed. One, five, and one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the wPbf genes for the A, B, and D genomes, respectively. Physical and genetic mapping utilizing some of the SNPs identified confirmed that wPbf genes are located close to the centromeres on the homoeologous group 5 chromosomes. The low level of allelic diversity found in wPbf genes may suggest that these genes play a key role and are thus constrained by selection.
    Functional and Integrative Genomics 11/2006; 6(4):310-21. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Information on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in hexaploid bread wheat is still scarce. The goal of this study was to detect SNPs in wheat and examine their frequency. Twenty-six bread wheat lines from different origins worldwide were used. Specific PCR-products were obtained from 21 genes and directly sequenced. SNPs were discovered from the alignment of these sequences. The overall sequence polymorphism observed in this sample appears to be low; 64 single-base polymorphisms were detected in approximately 21.5 kb (i.e., 1 SNP every 335 bp). The level of polymorphism is highly variable among the different genes studied. Fifty percent of the genes studied contained no sequence polymorphism, whereas most SNPs detected were located in only 2 genes. As expected, taking into account a synthetic line created with a wild Triticum tauschii parent increases the level of polymorphism (101 SNPs; 1 SNP every 212 bp). The detected SNPs are available at http://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/GnpSNP">http://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/GnpSNP. Data on linkage disequilibrium (LD) are still preliminary. They showed a significant level of LD in the 2 most polymorphic genes. To conclude, the genome size of hexaploid wheat and its low level of polymorphism complicate SNP discovery in this species.
    Genome 09/2006; 49(9):1131-9. · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A previous study in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) identified two candidate genes controlling a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) GluBx. These candidates were Glu-B1-1, the structural gene coding for Glu1Bx, and the B homoeologous gene coding for SPA (spa-B), a seed storage protein activator. The goal of this study was to identify the best candidate gene for this QTL. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are an abundant source of DNA polymorphisms that have been successfully used to identify loci associated with particular phenotypes. As no linkage disequilibrium was detected between Glu-B1-1 and spa-B, we performed an association study to identify the individual gene responsible for the QTL. Six SNPs, three located in Glu-B1-1 and three in spa-B, were genotyped by mass spectrometry in a collection of 113 bread wheat lines. These lines were also evaluated for protein content as well as the total quantity of HMW-GSs and of each HMW-GS in seed samples from two harvest years. Significant associations were detected only between Glu-B1-1 polymorphism and most of the traits evaluated. Spa-B was unambiguously discarded as a candidate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an association study that was successfully used to discriminate between two candidate genes.
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics 03/2006; 112(4):738-43. · 3.66 Impact Factor