J M Seddon

Tufts University, Georgia, United States

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Publications (215)1657.9 Total impact

  • Johanna M Seddon, Robyn Reynolds, Yi Yu, Bernard Rosner
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the independent impact of new genetic variants on conversion to advanced stages of AMD, controlling for established risk factors, and to determine the contribution of genes in predictive models. In this prospective longitudinal study of 2765 individuals, 777 subjects progressed to neovascular disease (NV) or geographic atrophy (GA) in either eye over 12 years. Recently reported genetic loci were assessed for their independent effects on incident advanced AMD after controlling for 6 established loci in 5 genes, and demographic, behavioral, and macular characteristics. New variants which remained significantly related to progression were then added to a final multivariate model to assess their independent effects. The contribution of genes to risk models was assessed using reclassification tables by determining risk within cross-classified quintiles for alternative models. THREE NEW GENETIC VARIANTS WERE SIGNIFICANTLY RELATED TO PROGRESSION: rare variant R1210C in CFH (hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-5.3, P = 0.01), and common variants in genes COL8A1 (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5, P = 0.02) and RAD51B (HR 0.8, 95% CI 0.60-0.97, P = 0.03). The area under the curve statistic (AUC) was significantly higher for the 9 gene model (.884) vs the 0 gene model (.873), P = .01. AUC's for the 9 vs 6 gene models were not significantly different, but reclassification analyses indicated significant added information for more genes, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for progression within 5 years per one quintile increase in risk score of 2.7, P<0.001 for the 9 vs 6 loci model, and OR 3.5, P<0.001 for the 9 vs. 0 gene model. Similar results were seen for NV and GA. Rare variant CFH R1210C and common variants in COL8A1 and RAD51B plus six genes in previous models contribute additional predictive information for advanced AMD beyond macular and behavioral phenotypes.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(1):e87047. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Lucia Sobrin, Johanna M Seddon
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual loss in the developed world. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of disease. Among environmental factors, smoking, obesity and dietary factors including antioxidants and dietary fat intake most consistently affect initiation and progression of AMD. There are also several lines of evidence that link both cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers to AMD. The genetic etiology of AMD has been and continues to be an intense and fruitful area of investigation. Genome-wide association studies have revealed many common variants associated with AMD and sequencing is increasing our knowledge of how rare variants impact disease. Evidence for specific interactions between environmental, therapeutic and genetic factors is emerging and elucidating the mechanisms of this interplay remains a major challenge in the field. The knowledge of non-genetic, modifiable risk factors along with information about heritability and genetic risk variants for this disease acquired over the past 25 years have greatly improved patient management and our ability to predict which patients will develop or progress to advanced forms of AMD.
    Progress in Retinal and Eye Research 12/2013; · 9.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To define the role of rare variants in advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk, we sequenced the exons of 681 genes within all reported AMD loci and related pathways in 2,493 cases and controls. We first tested each gene for increased or decreased burden of rare variants in cases compared to controls. We found that 7.8% of AMD cases compared to 2.3% of controls are carriers of rare missense CFI variants (odds ratio (OR) = 3.6; P = 2 × 10(-8)). There was a predominance of dysfunctional variants in cases compared to controls. We then tested individual variants for association with disease. We observed significant association with rare missense alleles in genes other than CFI. Genotyping in 5,115 independent samples confirmed associations with AMD of an allele in C3 encoding p.Lys155Gln (replication P = 3.5 × 10(-5), OR = 2.8; joint P = 5.2 × 10(-9), OR = 3.8) and an allele in C9 encoding p.Pro167Ser (replication P = 2.4 × 10(-5), OR = 2.2; joint P = 6.5 × 10(-7), OR = 2.2). Finally, we show that the allele of C3 encoding Gln155 results in resistance to proteolytic inactivation by CFH and CFI. These results implicate loss of C3 protein regulation and excessive alternative complement activation in AMD pathogenesis, thus informing both the direction of effect and mechanistic underpinnings of this disorder.
    Nature Genetics 09/2013; · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • Lucia Sobrin, Johanna M Seddon
    American journal of ophthalmology 08/2013; 156(2):213-217.e2. · 3.83 Impact Factor
  • Robyn Reynolds, Bernard Rosner, Johanna M Seddon
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between dietary omega-3 fatty acids and other fat intake, genes related to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and progression to geographic atrophy (GA). DESIGN: Observational analysis of a prospective cohort. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2531 individuals from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, among which 525 eyes progressed to GA and 4165 eyes did not. METHODS: Eyes without advanced AMD at baseline were evaluated for progression to GA. Behavioral data, including smoking and body mass index measurements, were collected at baseline using questionnaires. Dietary data were collected from food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) at baseline. Omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] and eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]), omega-6 fatty acids, monounsaturated, saturated, polyunsaturated, and total fat were adjusted for sex and calories and divided into quintiles (Q). Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in 7 genes (CFH, ARMS2/HTRA1, CFB, C2, C3, CFI, and LIPC) were genotyped. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test for associations between incident GA and intake of dietary lipids and interaction effects between dietary fat intake and genetic variation on risk of GA. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations between dietary fat intake reported from FFQs, genetic variants, and incident GA. RESULTS: Increased intake of DHA was significantly associated with reduced risk of progression to GA in models with behavioral factors (model A) plus genetic variants (model B) (P trend = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Total omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated (DHA + EPA) fatty acid intake was significantly associated with reduced risk of progression in model B (P trend = 0.02). Monounsaturated fat was associated with increased risk in model A (P trend = 0.05). DHA intake was significantly associated with reduced risk of incident GA among those with the ARMS2/HTRA1 homozygous risk genotype (hazard ratio [HR] Q5 vs Q1, 0.4; P = 0.002; P for interaction between gene and fat intake = 0.05). DHA was not associated with reduced risk of GA among those with the homozygous ARMS2/HTRA1 nonrisk genotype (HR, 1.0; P = 0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Increased self-reported dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with reduced risk of GA and may modify genetic susceptibility for progression to GA. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE(S): The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.
    Ophthalmology 03/2013; · 5.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10-8. These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10-8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD.
    Nature Genetics 03/2013; · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • Johanna M Seddon, Robyn Reynolds, Yi Yu, Bernard Rosner
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Risk score models predicting the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) to its advanced forms may be useful for targeting high-risk individuals for lifestyle changes that reduce risk for AMD progression, helping with differential diagnosis of AMD and its subtypes, identifying high-risk subjects for participation in clinical trials, and selecting appropriate therapies. OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a predictive model for progression to advanced stages of AMD in 2 independent cohorts. DESIGN Participants in a validation cohort and an independent derivation population were classified into 5 stages of AMD based on ocular examination and fundus photographs at baseline. Progression was defined as either eye progressing from stage 1, 2, or 3 to either stage 4 or stage 5 at any follow-up visit to the end of the study. Cox proportional hazards models were used for progression analyses. Covariates included demographic and environmental factors, 6 variants in 5 genes, and baseline AMD grades in both eyes. The algorithm developed with the derivation sample was assessed for calibration and discrimination in the validation data set. SETTING Clinic populations and referrals. PARTICIPANTS The derivation population comprised 2914 subjects with 809 progressors. The independent validation cohort comprised 980 individuals with no, early, or intermediate AMD in at least one eye at baseline, of whom 294 progressed to advanced stages of geographic atrophy or neovascular disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Progression to advanced AMD. RESULTS For the model with all nongenetic and genetic factors, the respective C statistics for progression to advanced AMD in the derivation and validation samples were 0.858 and 0.750 at 5 years and 0.884 and 0.809 at 10 years, and models also discriminated risk for progression to geographic atrophy and neovascular disease separately. For unilateral or bilateral intermediate AMD, 5-year cumulative incidence rates of progression to advanced AMD were 10% with the low-risk score and 50% with the high-risk score; for unilateral advanced disease, the progression rates were 22% and 80% for the fellow eye. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The risk prediction model was validated in an independent study of progression from no, early, or intermediate stages to advanced subtypes of AMD and will be useful for research, clinical trials, and personalized medicine.
    Jama Ophthalmology 02/2013; · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 x 10-8. These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 x 10-8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD.
    Nat Genet. 01/2013;
  • John P A Ioannidis, Yi Yu, Johanna M Seddon
    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 11/2012; 23(6):912-3. · 5.51 Impact Factor
  • John P A Ioannidis, Yi Yu, Johanna M Seddon
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    ABSTRACT: Misclassification of phenotype status can seriously affect accuracy in association studies, including studies of genetic risk factors. A common problem is the classification of participants as nondiseased because of insufficient diagnostic workup or because participants have not been followed up long enough to develop disease. Some validated predictive models may have high discrimination in predicting disease. We suggest that information from such models can be used to predict the risk that a nondiseased participant will eventually develop disease and to recode the status of participants predicted to be at highest risk. We evaluate conditions under which recoding results in a maximal net improvement in the accuracy of phenotype classification. Net improvement is expected only when the positive likelihood ratio of the predictive model is larger than the inverse of the odds of disease among apparently nondiseased controls. We conducted simulations to probe the impact of reclassification on the power to detect new risk factors under several scenarios of classification accuracy of the previously developed models. We also apply this framework to a validated model of progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration that uses genetic and nongenetic variables (area under the curve = 0.915). In the training cohort (n = 2,937) and a separate validation cohort (n = 1,227), 195-272 and 78-91 nonprogressor participants, respectively, were reclassified as progressors. Correction of phenotype misclassification based on highly informative predictive models may be helpful in identifying additional genetic and other risk factors, when there are validated risk factors that provide strong discriminating ability.
    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 09/2012; 23(6):902-9. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2012; 30(24):3028-3029. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors performed a systematic review of the association of complement component 2(C2)/complement factor B (CFB) gene polymorphisms with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In total, data from 19 studies published between 2006 and 2011 were pooled for 4 polymorphisms: rs9332739 and rs547154 in the C2 gene and rs4151667 and rs641153 in the CFB gene. Data extraction and assessments for risk of bias were independently performed by 2 reviewers. Allele frequencies and allele and genotypic effects were pooled. Heterogeneity and publication bias were explored. Pooled minor allele frequencies for all 4 SNPs were between 4.7% and 9.6% for all polymorphisms, except for an Indian population in which the C allele at rs9332739 was the major allele. For the C2 polymorphisms, the minor C allele at rs9332739 and the minor T allele at rs547154 carried estimated relative risks (odds ratios) of 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 0.65) and 0.47 (95% CI: 0.39, 0.57), respectively. For the CFB polymorphisms, the minor A alleles at rs4151667 and rs614153 carried estimated risks of 0.54 (95% CI: 0.45, 0.64) and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.51), respectively. These allele effects contributed to an absolute lowering of the risk of all AMD in Caucasian populations by 2.0%-6.0%. This meta-analysis provides a robust estimate of the protective association of C2/CFB with AMD.
    American journal of epidemiology 08/2012; 176(5):361-72. · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether the 2 subtypes of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and geographic atrophy (GA) segregate separately in families and to identify which genetic variants are associated with these 2 subtypes. Sibling correlation study and genome-wide association study (GWAS). For the sibling correlation study, 209 sibling pairs with advanced AMD were included. For the GWAS, 2594 participants with advanced AMD subtypes and 4134 controls were included. Replication cohorts included 5383 advanced AMD participants and 15 240 controls. Participants had the AMD grade assigned based on fundus photography, examination, or both. To determine heritability of advanced AMD subtypes, a sibling correlation study was performed. For the GWAS, genome-wide genotyping was conducted and 6 036 699 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed. Then, the SNPs were analyzed with a generalized linear model controlling for genotyping platform and genetic ancestry. The most significant associations were evaluated in independent cohorts. Concordance of advanced AMD subtypes in sibling pairs and associations between SNPs with GA and CNV advanced AMD subtypes. The difference between the observed and expected proportion of siblings concordant for the same subtype of advanced AMD was different to a statistically significant degree (P = 4.2 × 10(-5)), meaning that in siblings of probands with CNV or GA, the same advanced subtype is more likely to develop. In the analysis comparing participants with CNV to those with GA, a statistically significant association was observed at the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus (rs10490924; odds ratio [OR], 1.47; P = 4.3 × 10(-9)), which was confirmed in the replication samples (OR, 1.38; P = 7.4 × 10(-14) for combined discovery and replication analysis). Whether CNV versus GA develops in a patient with AMD is determined in part by genetic variation. In this large GWAS meta-analysis and replication analysis, the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus confers increased risk for both advanced AMD subtypes, but imparts greater risk for CNV than for GA. This locus explains a small proportion of the excess sibling correlation for advanced AMD subtype. Other loci were detected with suggestive associations that differ for advanced AMD subtypes and deserve follow-up in additional studies.
    Ophthalmology 06/2012; 119(9):1874-85. · 5.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nonsyndromic high myopia, defined by a refractive error greater than -6 diopters (D), is associated with an increased risk of macular choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a vision-threatening complication. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic factors associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are related to myopic CNV. We conducted a case-control study, including 71 cases with myopic CNV and 196 myopic controls without CNV, from Creteil and Toulouse, France, and Boston, MA. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 15 genes reported to be related to AMD were selected for association testing in this study. In univariate analysis, the rs10033900 SNP located in CFI was associated with myopic CNV (P = 0.0011), and a SNP in APOE was also related (P = 0.041). After adjustment for age, sex, and degree of myopia, SNPs in three genes were significantly associated, including CFI (odds ratio [OR] 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-3.37, P = 0.0023), COL8A1 (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.18-2.98, P = 0.0076), and CFH (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.02-2.66, P = 0.04). After correction for multiple testing, only CFI remained significantly related to high myopic CNV (P = 0.045). We report the first genetic associations with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a high myopic Caucasian population. One SNP (rs10033900) in the CFI gene, which encodes a protein involved in the inflammatory pathway, was significantly associated with myopic CNV in multivariate analysis after correction for multiple testing. This SNP is a plausible biological marker associated with CNV outgrowth among high myopic patients. Results generate hypotheses about potential loci related to CNV in high myopia, and larger studies are needed to expand on these findings.
    Investigative ophthalmology & visual science 06/2012; 53(8):5004-9. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness worldwide. With ageing populations in many countries, more than 20% might have the disorder. Advanced age-related macular degeneration, including neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet) and geographic atrophy (late dry), is associated with substantial, progressive visual impairment. Major risk factors include cigarette smoking, nutritional factors, cardiovascular diseases, and genetic markers, including genes regulating complement, lipid, angiogenic, and extracellular matrix pathways. Some studies have suggested a declining prevalence of age-related macular degeneration, perhaps due to reduced exposure to modifiable risk factors. Accurate diagnosis combines clinical examination and investigations, including retinal photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Dietary anti-oxidant supplementation slows progression of the disease. Treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration incorporates intraocular injections of anti-VEGF agents, occasionally combined with other modalities. Evidence suggests that two commonly used anti-VEGF therapies, ranibizumab and bevacizumab, have similar efficacy, but possible differences in systemic safety are difficult to assess. Future treatments include inhibition of other angiogenic factors, and regenerative and topical therapies.
    The Lancet 05/2012; 379(9827):1728-38. · 39.06 Impact Factor
  • Johanna M Seddon, Robyn Reynolds, Bernard Rosner
    Ophthalmology 05/2012; 119(5):1091. · 5.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the risk of second cancer (SC) in long-term survivors of retinoblastoma (Rb) according to classification of germline mutation, based on family history of Rb and laterality. We assembled a cohort of 1,852 1-year survivors of Rb (bilateral, n = 1,036; unilateral, n = 816). SCs were ascertained by medical records and self-reports and confirmed by pathology reports. Classification of RB1 germline mutation, inherited or de novo, was inferred by laterality of Rb and positive family history of Rb. Standardized incidence ratios and cumulative incidence for all SCs combined and for soft tissue sarcomas, bone cancers, and melanoma were calculated. The influence of host- and therapy-related risk factors for SC was assessed by Poisson regression for bilateral survivors. We observed a relative risk (RR) of 1.37 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.86) for SCs in bilateral survivors associated with a family history of Rb, adjusted for treatment, age, and length of follow-up. The risk for melanoma was significantly elevated for survivors with a family history of Rb (RR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.23 to 7.16), but risks for bone or soft tissue sarcomas were not elevated. The cumulative incidence of SCs 50 years after diagnosis of bilateral Rb, with adjustment for competing risk of death, was significantly higher for survivors with a family history (47%; 95% CI, 35% to 59%) than survivors without a family history (38%; 95% CI, 32% to 44%; P = .004). Rb survivors with bilateral disease and an inherited germline mutation are at slightly higher risk of an SC compared with those with a de novo germline mutation, in particular melanoma, perhaps because of shared genetic alterations.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2012; 30(9):950-7. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the US, second non-ocular malignancies are the primary cause of death in retinoblastoma survivors with the germline RB1 mutation. Soft tissue sarcomas are one of the most likely malignancies to pose a risk to these patients, with leiomyosarcoma (LMS) being the most common subtype. As our cohort is followed for a longer period, we discover new second malignancy risks for these patients. We estimated the risk for uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) in a cohort of 1854 patients with retinoblastoma who were diagnosed at two US institutions from 1914 through 1996. The standardized incidence ratio and excess absolute risk were calculated by comparison with population data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry or from National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The cumulative risk at 50 years of age was also calculated. Seven of 525 female hereditary retinoblastoma patients developed ULMS. Five of these patients were used in the risk analysis, resulting in an excess risk of 3.87 per 10,000 women. Among hereditary patients who developed ULMS the excess risk increases dramatically with age: to 20/10,000 for female hereditary retinoblastoma patients aged between 30 and 39 years, and to 27/10,000 for patients aged 40+ years. There is a substantial excess risk of ULMS in female hereditary retinoblastoma patients. As more patients survive into their thirties, this number is likely to increase. These findings raise the question of early childbearing, screening and prophylactic measures in hereditary retinoblastoma patients: all issues that would benefit from confirmation from other retinoblastoma cohorts, to allow for better guided counsel of these patients.
    Gynecologic Oncology 02/2012; 124(2):254-9. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Understanding the effect of genes on progression to different stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may suggest stage-specific therapeutic targets and more precise prediction of the development of this disease. Progression events and time to each stage of AMD were derived from the longitudinal data of 2560 subjects without advanced AMD. SNPs in 12 AMD risk loci were genotyped. A multistate Markov model for progression from normal to intermediate drusen, then to large drusen, and eventually to neovascular disease (NV) or geographic atrophy (GA) was applied to estimate stage-specific hazard ratios for each SNP. The effects of these genetic factors were also estimated by a multivariate multistate Markov model adjusted for baseline age, sex, smoking, body mass index (BMI), education, antioxidant treatment, and the status of AMD in the fellow eye. Controlling for demographic and behavioral factors and other SNPs, the TT genotype of rs10468017 in LIPC was associated with decreased risk of progression from large drusen to NV (HR = 0.57, P = 0.04) and tended to reduce the risk of progression from normal to intermediate drusen (HR = 0.72, P = 0.07). The SNP rs1883025 (T allele) in ABCA1 was associated with decreased risk of progression from normal to intermediate drusen (HR per allele = 0.82 per allele, P = 9.7 × 10(-3)) and from intermediate drusen to large drusen (HR per allele = 0.77, P = 5.2 × 10(-3)). The genes CFH, C3, CFB, and ARMS2/HTRA1 were associated with progression from intermediate drusen to large drusen and from large drusen to GA or NV. Genes in different pathways influence progression to different stages of AMD.
    Investigative ophthalmology & visual science 01/2012; 53(3):1548-56. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two common variants in the gene encoding complement factor H (CFH), the Y402H substitution (rs1061170, c.1204C>T)(1-4) and the intronic rs1410996 SNP(5,6), explain 17% of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) liability. However, proof for the involvement of CFH, as opposed to a neighboring transcript, and knowledge of the potential mechanism of susceptibility alleles are lacking. Assuming that rare functional variants might provide mechanistic insights, we used genotype data and high-throughput sequencing to discover a rare, high-risk CFH haplotype with a c.3628C>T mutation that resulted in an R1210C substitution. This allele has been implicated previously in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and it abrogates C-terminal ligand binding(7,8). Genotyping R1210C in 2,423 AMD cases and 1,122 controls demonstrated high penetrance (present in 40 cases versus 1 control, P = 7.0 × 10(-6)) and an association with a 6-year-earlier onset of disease (P = 2.3 × 10(-6)). This result suggests that loss-of-function alleles at CFH are likely to drive AMD risk. This finding represents one of the first instances in which a common complex disease variant has led to the discovery of a rare penetrant mutation.
    Nature Genetics 12/2011; 43(12):1232-6. · 35.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

10k Citations
739 Downloads
1,657.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • Tufts University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Tufts Center for Conservation Medicine
      Georgia, United States
  • 2007–2013
    • Tufts Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • The EMMES Corporation
      Maryland, United States
  • 1989–2013
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Abt Associates
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Paris-Est
      Centre, France
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1995–2012
    • National Institutes of Health
      • • Branch of Radiation Epidemiology
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry
      Maryland, United States
  • 1984–2012
    • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
      • • Department of Ophthalmology
      • • Epidemiology Unit
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011
    • Boston University
      • Slone Epidemiology Center
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
      • Program in Medical and Population Genetics
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • Mount Sinai School of Medicine
      • Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences
      Manhattan, NY, United States
  • 1994–2011
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • • Division of Genetics
      • • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2005–2010
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • Center for Human Genetic Research
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2008
    • National Eye Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 2007–2008
    • Oregon Health and Science University
      Portland, Oregon, United States
  • 2000–2007
    • Harvard University
      • • Department of Epidemiology
      • • Department of Nutrition
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2002
    • University of Utah
      • Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
      Salt Lake City, UT, United States
  • 1999–2000
    • University of Massachusetts Amherst
      • Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology
      Amherst Center, MA, United States
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • Department of Medicine
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 1993
    • Northwestern University
      • Department of Ophthalmology
      Evanston, IL, United States
  • 1992
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States