Daniel E Vigo

Catholic University of Salta, Ciudad de Salta, Salta, Argentina

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Publications (28)56.57 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleep in adolescents has been shown to be an important factor when looking at physical, mental, and social well-being. Little evidence is found regarding sleep patterns in adolescents from households facing extreme poverty, where conditions such as crowding, poor housing, sanitation or education, and precarious employment set an adverse environment for sleep. In this study, we sought to assess in a nationwide sample comprised of 1,682 adolescents from Argentina, how the presence of extreme poverty—as defined by the presence of unsatisfied basic needs (UBN)—affects the relationship of sleep duration with school, work, and other daily activities. A global high prevalence of short sleeping time, a slight increase of sleep time in adolescents with UBN, and different patterns of wake activities that predict sleep deficit, depending on the presence of UBN, were found. The poor academic achievement, increased risk of accidents, and adverse health outcomes associated with sleep deprivation support the view that sleep is an additional unsatisfied basic need that worsens living conditions at this age. The results may help to design public health policies that contribute to ameliorate this adverse situation.
    Mind Brain and Education 12/2014; 8(4). · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV) of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.02), while no differences were found with "classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3). These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P < 0.004). Significant differences across melodies were also found for nonlinear HRV indexes. Subjects' preferences did not correlate with autonomic responses to melodies. The results suggest that "new age" music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener.
    Noise & health. 09/2014; 16(72):279-84.
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    ABSTRACT: The unprecedented urban growth in face of increasing poverty and so-cial inequity in developing countries is posing an immense challenge at all levels. The urbanization of poverty is reflected mainly by the proliferation and expansion of slums. Over one billion people (about 14 percent of the world population) are slum dwellers. According to UN-HABITAT predic-tions, the number of slum dwellers could double by the year 2030, due to the increase of social inequality and poverty in the context of an extraor-dinary urban growth. Slum dwellers do share the fact that they live in the most adverse of circumstances and poor sleep conditions presumably could amplify health related problems typical of the slum environment like psy-chological distress, poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle and cardiovascular disease. In a first part of our study we applied a brief version of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) to the sample population examined by the Barómetro de la Deuda Social Argentina, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina (N= 5766). The aim of this program is the identification, monitoring and evaluation of the dynamics and scope of the social debt understood as deficit in human development capabilities and social integration of the population. It also assesses the effect of policies and public-private actions affecting its state and evolution. Analysis of the distribution of sleep disorders as a func-tion of socioeconomic status, residential status and place of residence indi-cated that the very low socio-economic stratum had a higher percentage
    Bread and Brain, Education and Poverty Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Scripta Varia 125, Vatican City 2014, www.pas.va/content/dam/accademia/pdf/sv125/sv125-cardinali.pdf; 02/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The Mars500 project was conceived to gather knowledge about the psychological and physiological effects of living in an enclosed environment during 520 d as would be required for a real mission to Mars. Our objective was to investigate the circadian profile of heart rate variability (HRV) in the context of the Mars500 study. Before, during, and after confinement, 24-h EKG records were obtained from the six crewmembers who participated in the mission. Autonomic activity was evaluated through time and frequency domain indexes of HRV analysis. Circadian rhythmicity was assessed both by averaging hourly HRV along wake and sleep scheduled periods and by fitting a 24-h harmonic to the hourly means. During confinement, wake HRV showed (mean +/- SE) a progressive increase in mean RR interval (from 778 +/- 24 ms to 916 +/- 42 ms), and in the amplitude (values are wavelet power coefficients) of very low (from 13.3 +/- 0.3 to 14.1 +/- 0.2) and high (from 7.8 +/- 0.4 to 8.3 +/- 0.3) frequency components. During sleep, the relative amplitude of the high frequency component of HRV decreased (from 11.8 +/- 1.6 to 9.4 +/- 1.8 normalized units). Overall, sleep-wake differences of HRV showed a progressive decrease of the relative amplitude of the high frequency component. Also, circadian HRV rhythms were dampened during confinement. Data revealed diminished amplitude of the rest-activity pattern of the autonomic nervous system parasympathetic function. Reduced daylight exposure and mood changes could account for this observation.
    Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine 10/2013; 84(10):1023-8. · 0.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Palliative care practitioners suffer a considerable burden of stress. Although it is not possible to eliminate stress entirely, people can learn to manage it. Mind/Body intervention help individuals turn maladaptive responses to stress into more adaptive ones. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of mind body techniques in a group of Palliative Care professionals. Methods: We investigated anxiety, anger, baseline salivary cortisol levels immediately after awakening and autonomic nervous system activity in a group of health care professionals from a Palliative Care Unit (n = 22). In addition, we assessed the autonomic response to relax instructions. The participants were divided into two groups according to their regular practice of mind-body techniques.Results: No significant differences between groups were found for anxiety and anger. Baseline salivary cortisol levels were significantly greater in the untrained group (5.23 ± 5.16 μg/dl) when compared with the trained one (0.57 ± 0.19 μg/dl) (Mann-Whitney U Test = 0; p < 0.001). When comparing heart rate variability (HRV) values during relaxation with HRV values at rest within each group, trained subjects showed a significant increase in LF% (z = -2.073, p = 0.038), while untrained subjects showed a significant increase in HF% (z = -2.100, p = 0.036). Conclusions: Subjects who regularly practice mind-body techniques evidenced lower baseline morning cortisol levels and achieved a differential autonomic response to relax instructions.
    European Journal of Integrative Medicine 01/2013; · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of a housing transition on sleep quality and quality of life in slum dwellers, participating in a slum housing upgrading program. Observational before-and-after study with a convergent-parallel mixed method design. Five slums located in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. A total of 150 slum dwellers benefited by a housing program of the nonprofit organization TECHO (spanish word for "roof"). Participants moved from their very low-quality house to a basic prefabricated 18 m(2) modular house provided by TECHO. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and World Health Organization Quality of Life brief scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were administered before and after housing upgrading. Data about housing conditions, income, education, sleeping conditions, and cardiovascular risk were also collected. Semistructured interviews were used to expand and nuance quantitative data obtained from a poorly educated sample. Results showed that sleep quality significantly increased after the housing program (z = -6.57, P < 0.001). Overall quality of life (z = -6.85, P < 0.001), physical health domain (z = -4.35, P < 0.001), psychological well-being domain (z = -3.72, P < 0.001) and environmental domain (z = -7.10, P < 0.001) of WHOQOL-BREF were also improved. Interviews demonstrated the importance of serenity for improving quality of life. A minimal improvement in the quality of basic housing can significantly increase sleep quality and quality of life among slum dwellers. Understanding sleep and daily life conditions in informal urban settlements could help to define what kind of low-cost intervention may improve sleep quality, quality of life, and reduce existent sleep disparity. Simonelli G; Leanza Y; Boilard A; Hyland M; Augustinavicius JL; Cardinali DP; Vallières A; Pérez-Chada D; Vigo DE. Sleep and quality of life in urban poverty: the effect of a slum housing upgrading program. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1669-1676.
    Sleep 01/2013; 36(11):1669-76. · 5.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A multi-step causality pathway connecting short sleep duration to daytime somnolence and sleepiness leading to reduced attention and poor academic performance as the final result can be envisaged. However this hypothesis has never been explored. To explore consecutive correlations between sleep duration, daytime somnolence, attention levels, and academic performance in a sample of school-aged teenagers. We carried out a survey assessing sleep duration and daytime somnolence using the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS). Sleep duration variables included week-days' total sleep time, usual bedtimes, and absolute weekdayto-weekend sleep time difference. Attention was assessed by d2 test and by the coding subtest from the WISC-IV scale. Academic performance was obtained from literature and math grades. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the independent relationships between these variables, while controlling for confounding effects of other variables, in one single model. Standardized regression weights (SWR) for relationships between these variables are reported. Study sample included 1,194 teenagers (mean age: 15 years; range: 13-17 y). Sleep duration was inversely associated with daytime somnolence (SWR = -0.36, p < 0.01) while sleepiness was negatively associated with attention (SWR = -0.13, p < 0.01). Attention scores correlated positively with academic results (SWR = 0.18, p < 0.01). Daytime somnolence correlated negatively with academic achievements (SWR = -0.16, p < 0.01). The model offered an acceptable fit according to usual measures (RMSEA = 0.0548, CFI = 0.874, NFI = 0.838). A Sobel test confirmed that short sleep duration influenced attention through daytime somnolence (p < 0.02), which in turn influenced academic achievements through reduced attention (p < 0.002). Poor academic achievements correlated with reduced attention, which in turn was related to daytime somnolence. Somnolence correlated with short sleep duration. Perez-Lloret S; Videla AJ; Richaudeau A; Vigo D; Rossi M; Cardinali DP; Perez-Chada D. A multi-step pathway connecting short sleep duration to daytime somnolence, reduced attention, and poor academic performance: an exploratory cross-sectional study in teenagers. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(5):469-473.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2013; 9(5):469-473. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is characterized by chronic worry. Mindfulness-based stress reduction is thought to remediate excessive worry, because it counteracts a permanent defense state of enhanced vigilance to potential threats. The present study aimed to compare respiratory variability (RV) during worry and mindfulness. Following an 8-minute baseline, 37 healthy participants underwent 11-min worry and mindfulness inductions, in randomized order, using auditory scripts. Respiration was measured by chest and abdominal inductance belts. RV was quantified by (1) autocorrelation to assess linear breathing variability, (2) sample entropy to assess nonlinear breathing variability. Compared to baseline and mindfulness, worry showed decreased autocorrelation in all respiratory parameters and compared to mindfulness, worry showed decreased entropy in respiratory rate. These results suggest that, in contrast to mindfulness, worry is characterized by decreased respiratory stability and flexibility, and therefore worry and mindfulness seem to have countering effects on RV and respiratory regulation.
    International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology 12/2012; · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • Biomedizinische Technik/Biomedical Engineering 08/2012; · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In prolonged spaceflights the effect of long-term confinement on the autonomic regulation of the heart is difficult to separate from the effect of prolonged exposure to microgravity or other space-related stressors. Our objective was to investigate whether the sleep-wake variations in the autonomic control of the heart are specifically altered by long-term confinement during the 105-d pilot study of the Earth-based Mars500 project. Before (pre), during (T1: 30, T2: 70, andT3: 100 d), and after (post) confinement, 24-h EKG records were obtained from the six crewmembers that participated in the mission. Sleep and wake periods were determined by fitting a square wave to the data. Autonomic activity was evaluated through time and frequency domain indexes of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis during wake and sleep periods. During confinement, wake HRV showed decreased mean heart rate and increased amplitude at all frequency levels, particularly in the very low (pre: 13.3 +/- 0.2; T1: 13.9 +/- 0.3; T2: 13.9 +/- 0.2; T3: 13.9 +/- 0.2; post: 13.2 +/- 0.2) and high (pre: 7.6 +/- 0.4; T1: 8.3 +/- 0.5; T2: 8.2 +/- 0.4; T3: 8.1 +/- 0.4; post: 7.6 +/- 0.3) frequency components (values expressed as mean +/- SE of wavelet power coefficients). Sleep HRV remained constant, while sleep-wake high frequency HRV differences diminished. The observed autonomic changes during confinement reflect an increase in parasympathetic activity during wake periods. Several factors could account for this observation, including reduced daylight exposure related to the confinement situation.
    Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine 02/2012; 83(2):125-30. · 0.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an etiologically heterogeneous syndrome defined by cognitive impairment in advance of dementia. We previously reported in a retrospective analysis that daily 3 - 9 mg of a fast-release melatonin preparation given p. o. at bedtime for up to 3 years significantly improved cognitive and emotional performance and daily sleep/wake cycle in MCI patients. In a follow up of that study we now report data from another series of 96 MCI outpatients, 61 of who had received daily 3 - 24 mg of a fast-release melatonin preparation p. o. at bedtime for 15 to 60 months. Melatonin was given in addition to the standard medication prescribed by the attending psychiatrist. Patients treated with melatonin exhibited significantly better performance in Mini-Mental State Examination and the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale. After application of a neuropsychological battery comprising a Mattis´ test, Digit-symbol test, Trail A and B tasks and the Rey´s verbal test, better performance was found in melatonin-treated patients for every parameter tested. Abnormally high Beck Depression Inventory scores decreased in melatonin-treated patients, concomitantly with the improvement in the quality of sleep and wakefulness. The comparison of the medication profile in both groups of MCI patients indicated that 9.8% in the melatonin group received benzodiazepines vs. 62.8% in the non-melatonin group. The results further support that melatonin can be a useful add-on drug for treating MCI in a clinic environment.
    American journal of neurodegenerative disease. 01/2012; 1(3):280-91.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to determine whether patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected first-degree relatives have abnormal autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to social cognition tasks. Social cognition impairments are significant in schizophrenia. ANS activity has been shown to be abnormal in schizophrenia patients, and some of the abnormalities seem to be shared by patients' unaffected relatives. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured at rest and during social cognition tasks, in patients with schizophrenia, their nonpsychotic first-degree relatives, and matched healthy controls (n=19 in each group). Social cognition tasks induced a shortening of the RR interval in unaffected relatives, but not in patients. Social cognition tasks generated decreases in high-frequency (indicating cardiac vagal activity) and low-frequency (reflecting predominantly sympathetic activity) HRV in patients. In relatives, the decrease occurred in the high-frequency component only. Low-frequency HRV was higher in patients during a theory of mind task than a control task. These changes were not observed in the controls. Social cognitive tasks induce a pattern of peripheral autonomic activity different from that seen in generic arousal responses, and this pattern is abnormal in schizophrenia patients. Autonomic abnormalities in unaffected first-degree relatives seem restricted to the parasympathetic division of the ANS.
    Cognitive and behavioral neurology: official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology 11/2011; 24(4):194-203. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study sought to determine whether autonomic activity is associated with dominance in verbal over spatial reasoning tasks. A group of 19 healthy adults who performed a verbal and spatial aptitude test was evaluated. Autonomic function was assessed by means of heart rate variability analysis, before and during the tasks. The results showed that a better relative performance in verbal over spatial reasoning tasks was associated with vagal prevalence in normal subjects.
    Autonomic neuroscience: basic & clinical 11/2011; 167(1-2):78-80. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term confinement and microgravity may entail alteration in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. A 105-d pilot study of a Mars mission simulation was conducted to test the cardiovascular response to slow-paced breathing and mental stress. Finger blood pressure and beat-to-beat heart rate were monitored in six male volunteers taking part in a 105-d Mars mission simulation. Data were collected before, during (Days 35-38, 70-72, and 100), and after confinement. Recordings were performed in the sitting position during 5-min spontaneous breathing, 3-min 12 cycle/min breathing, 3-min 6 cycle/min breathing, and 5-min mental task performance. We found significant U-shaped changes across the confinement period in systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In the first month of confinement, mental task performance significantly lowered SAP by 34.23 mmHg and MAP by 19.89 mmHg compared to spontaneous breathing, whereas these changes were reversed during other periods. Furthermore, no differences in arterial pressure and heart rate were found between spontaneous, 12 cycle/min, and 6 cycle/min breathing. Our findings are in line with and extend previous findings on the alteration of blood pressure regulation due to long-term confinement.
    Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine 07/2011; 82(7):711-6. · 0.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate sleep, alertness, salivary cortisol levels, and autonomic activity in the afternoon and morning shifts of a sample of short-distance bus drivers. A sample of 47 bus drivers was evaluated. Data regarding subjects and working characteristics, alertness (psychomotor vigilance task), sleep habits (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Actigraphy), endocrine stress response (salivary cortisol), and autonomic activity (heart-rate variability) were collected. Sleep restriction was highly prevalent. Drivers in the morning shift slept 1 hour less than those in the afternoon shift, showed lower reaction time performance, a flattening of cortisol morning-evening difference, and higher overweight prevalence. The differences found between morning and afternoon shifts point out to the need of the implementation of educational strategies to compensate the sleep loss associated with an early work schedule.
    Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 06/2011; 53(7):806-11. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the relationship between the autonomic nervous system basal state and performance in decision-making tasks. The link between performance in decision-making tasks and acute changes in autonomic parameters during their execution has been extensively investigated. However, there is lacking evidence regarding the relationship between decision making and basal autonomic state. Resting autonomic nervous system activity in 18 healthy individuals was assessed by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis before conducting 3 different decision-making tasks: an ambiguous one, the Iowa Gambling Task; a test that assesses risk-taking behavior, the Game of Dice Task; and a test that assesses reversal learning behavior, the Reversal Learning Task. The tasks were administered in a random manner. There was a direct correlation between the Iowa Gambling Task net score and the resting low frequency HRV (r = 0.73; P < 0.001), which is strongly influenced by sympathetic activity. No correlations were found between HRV and the Game of Dice Task net score or the Reversal Learning Task last error trial. The results are compatible with the idea that a higher basal activation of autonomic nervous system is beneficial for subsequent decision-making process.
    Cognitive and behavioral neurology: official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology 06/2011; 24(2):93-8. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute hypobaric hypoxia is associated with autonomic changes that bring a global reduction of linear heart rate variability (HRV). Although changes in nonlinear HRV can be associated with physiologic stress and are relevant predictors of fatal arrhythmias in ischemic heart disease, to what extent these components vary in sudden hypobaric hypoxia is not known. Twelve military pilots were supplemented with increasing concentrations of oxygen during decompression to 8230 m in a hypobaric chamber. Linear and nonlinear HRV was evaluated at 8230 m altitude before, during, and after oxygen flow deprivation. Linear HRV was assessed through traditional time-domain and frequency-domain analysis. Nonlinear HRV was quantified through the short-term fractal correlation exponent alpha (alphas) and the Sample Entropy index (SampEn). Hypoxia was related to a decrease in linear HRV indexes at all frequency levels. A non-significant decrease in alphas (basal, 1.39 +/- 0.07; hypoxia, 1.11 +/- 0.13; recovery, 1.41 +/- 0.05; P = .054) and a significant increase in SampEn (basal, 1.07 +/- 0.11; hypoxia, 1.45 +/- 0.12; recovery, 1.43 +/- 0.09; P = .018) were detected. The observed pattern of diminished linear HRV and increased nonlinear HRV is similar to that seen in subjects undergoing heavy exercise or in patients with ischemic heart disease at high risk for ventricular fibrillation.
    Wilderness and Environmental Medicine 03/2010; 21(1):4-10. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to assess the relationships among mood, peripheral autonomic output and circulating immunoinflammatory mediators in older individuals with decompensated heart failure (CHF), 20 consecutive patients (78±7 years, 35% women) admitted to the coronary care unit with a clinical diagnosis of acute/decompensated CHF of coronary origin were examined. Mood was evaluated by the 21-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D). Four patients met the criteria for major depression. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and the levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured within 24–72 h of admission. A significant positive relationship between score in HAM-D and serum IL-6 levels was detected with a similar trend as far as IL-2 levels. Circulating IL-2 levels were strongly associated with the HRV L/H quotient, an index of increased sympathetic and/or decreased parasympathetic thoracic activity. A negative correlation between vagal activity (as assessed by HRV) and IL-4 occurred. Neither TNF-α nor IL-10 were detectable in this group of elderly patients. The results add to the concept that mood and autonomic unbalance are associated with increased systemic inflammation in old patients with decompensated CHF, a potential mechanism for mood-related worsened prognosis of heart failure at an advanced age.
    The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry 12/2009; 10(4_3):913-918. · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heart rate variability (HRV) is a complex signal that results from the contribution of different sources of oscillation related to the autonomic nervous system activity. Although linear analysis of HRV has been applied to sleep studies, the nonlinear dynamics of HRV underlying frequency components during sleep is less known. We conducted a study to evaluate nonlinear HRV within independent frequency components in wake status, slow-wave sleep (SWS, stages III or IV of non-rapid eye movement sleep), and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM). The sample included 10 healthy adults. Polysomnography was performed to detect sleep stages. HRV was studied globally during each phase and then very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) components were separated by means of the wavelet transform algorithm. HRV nonlinear dynamics was estimated with sample entropy (SampEn). A higher SampEn was found when analyzing global variability (Wake: 1.53+/-0.28, SWS: 1.76+/-0.32, REM: 1.45+/-0.19, p=0.005) and VLF variability (Wake: 0.13+/-0.03, SWS: 0.19+/-0.03, REM: 0.14+/-0.03, p<0.001) at SWS. REM was similar to wake status regarding nonlinear HRV. We propose nonlinear HRV is a useful index of the autonomic activity that characterizes the different sleep-wake cycle stages.
    Autonomic neuroscience: basic & clinical 11/2009; 154(1-2):84-8. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia patients exhibit an abnormal autonomic response to mental stress. We sought to determine the cardiac autonomic response to mental arithmetic stress in their unaffected first-degree relatives. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was performed on recordings obtained before, during, and after a standard mental arithmetic task to induce mental stress. 22 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia (R) and 22 healthy individuals (C) were included in this study. Patients' relatives (R) had a normal response to the mental arithmetic stress test, showing an increased heart rate compared with controls. They also displayed the characteristic pattern of relative contributions of HRV components that consists of increased low-frequency (LF) HRV and decreased high-frequency (HF) HRV. Recovery of the resting pattern of HRV immediately after stress termination was observed in healthy subjects (LF 62+/-16% vs. 74+/-10% , HF 37+/-16% vs. 25+/-10%, F=9.616, p=0.004), but not in patients' relatives (LF 60+/-19% vs. 70+/-13%, HF 40+/-19% vs. 29+/-13%, F=8.4, p=0.056). First-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients exhibit an abnormal pattern of protracted response to mental arithmetic stress, though less intense than that observed in patients in a previous study. This suggests that a pattern of autonomic response to stress may therefore be familial and heritable.
    Schizophrenia Research 02/2009; 109(1-3):134-40. · 4.59 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

152 Citations
56.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Catholic University of Salta
      Ciudad de Salta, Salta, Argentina
  • 2011–2014
    • Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina
      • Departamento de Docencia e Investigación en Biomedicina
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
    • University of Leuven
      • Research unit for Health Psychology
      Louvain, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2006–2013
    • National Scientific and Technical Research Council
      • Departmento de Investigacion
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 2004–2012
    • University of Buenos Aires
      • • Research Methodology Section
      • • Physiology Section
      • • Department of Physiology
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina