Danny Schoors

University Hospital Brussels, Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium

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Publications (39)210.53 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: We studied coronary vasomotion in patients treated with the Mistent® absorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (APSES) and in patients implanted with the Endeavor® zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES).Background: First generation (1st-gen) drug-eluting stents (DES) induce persistent vasomotor dysfunction in the treated coronary artery. It is unknown whether and to what extent the implantation of an absorbable polymer DES impairs coronary vasomotion.Methods: This sub-study of the DESSOLVE II trial included 19 APSES Mistent® and 10 ZES Endeavor® patients. Incremental atrial pacing and quantitative coronary angiography were used to assess vasomotion proximal and distal to the stent and in a reference segment at 9 months after implantation. Percent changes in vessel diameter with pacing versus baseline were calculated and compared. Vasomotor response of the APSES group was also compared with changes observed in a historical group of 17 patients implanted with a 1st-gen sirolimus-eluting stent (SES).Results: Normal vasomotion (vasodilatation) was preserved and of comparable magnitude in the APSES and in the ZES group both proximally (p=0.34) and distally (p=0.38) to the stent. This finding was not observed in the 1st-gen SES group showing marked pacing-induced vasoconstriction at both stent edges (p<0.05 vs. APSES). The results were practically unchanged after excluding patients with absolute changes in vessel diameter <3% between baseline and maximal pacing.Conclusions: The implantation of an absorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent is associated with preserved coronary vasomotion, comparable to that observed after implantation of the Endeavor® ZES, and distinct from 1st-gen SES which induce coronary vasomotor dysfunction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 07/2014; · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: To compare the efficacy and safety of the MiStent absorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (APSES) with a zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES). Methods and results: The trial was a 2:1 randomisation at 26 sites of 184 patients implanted with an APSES (n=123) versus a ZES (n=61). Following stent implantation, all patients underwent quantitative coronary angiography at baseline and at nine months of follow-up, while a select subgroup also underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT). The primary efficacy hypothesis was superiority of in-stent late lumen loss (LLL) of APSES compared to ZES. At nine months, the primary endpoint was met, with a mean in-stent LLL of 0.27±0.46 mm in 103 APSES patients versus 0.58±0.41 mm in 52 ZES patients (p<0.001). The proportion of uncovered stent struts by OCT at nine months was very low in both groups. The mean neointimal thickness of covered struts (p=0.002) and percent net volume obstruction (p≤0.003) were significantly lower in the APSES than in the ZES group. Major adverse cardiac event and stent thrombosis rates were low and comparable between groups. Conclusions: The DESSOLVE II trial demonstrated superiority in the primary efficacy endpoint of nine-month mean LLL for APSES compared to ZES. Strut coverage by OCT was high with both stents and the clinical safety endpoints including stent thrombosis were equally low in both groups. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01294748.
    EuroIntervention: journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology 05/2014; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vasodilators are used with caution in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have developed a device for percutaneous arteriovenous shunt creation in the iliac region to increase cardiac output and oxygen delivery for patients with COPD. Although this device does not cause significant blood pressure changes in normotensive patients with COPD, we hypothesized that arteriovenous shunt creation might cause vasodilator effects in hypertensive patients because of a reduction in vascular resistance. Twenty-four patients with COPD and hypertension enrolled in an open label study of arteriovenous shunt creation for COPD. We performed cardiac catheterization at baseline and again 3 to 6 months after the procedure. As a safety measure we also recorded office blood pressure at baseline and again after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The procedure increased oxygen delivery (1.1-1.4 L.min(-1)) and cardiac output (6-8.2 L.min(-1)) (P < .001) and lowered both the systemic vascular resistance (P < .001) and the pulmonary vascular resistance (P < .01). After 12 months, however, the average systolic blood pressure was reduced from 145 to 132 mm Hg (P < .0001), and the average diastolic blood pressure was reduced from 86 to 67 mm Hg (P < .0001). Percutaneous iliac arteriovenous fistula creation for COPD causes a significant and persistent lowering of blood pressure in patients with co-existing hypertension.
    Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter 01/2014; · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • Lucie Soens, Danny Schoors, Guy Van Camp
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    ABSTRACT: Secondary cardiac lymphoma is commonly recognised as one of the most frequent metastatic malignancies involving the heart, after lung and breast carcinomas. Most primary and secondary cardiac lymphoma are non-Hodgkin lymphomas.The pericardium is the most frequently involved cardiac structure. However, the myocardium and the endocardium can also be affected. The patient presented in this case report had a secondary cardiac diffuse large B cell lymphoma. He presented initially with dyspnoea due to cardiac tamponade. He died one month after pericardial fenestration as a result of acute left and right heart failure due to diffuse lymphomatous infiltrations.This cardiac infiltration progressed so quickly that histological diagnosis could not be obtained before death. Autopsy revealed massive infiltration of the heart, the thyroid, abdominal lymph nodes, the left kidney, the pancreas and the right testis.
    Acta cardiologica 02/2012; 67(1):101-4. · 0.61 Impact Factor
  • Acta cardiologica 01/2010; · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Myocardial contrast perfusion echocardiography (MCE) allows simultaneous assessment of perfusion and function. However, low frame rate during MCE may reduce the viewer's ability to discern contractile dysfunction. This study sought to compare MCE and left ventricular opacification (LVO) settings with regard to wall motion abnormalities (WMA) at rest and during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). In 50 patients scheduled for coronary angiography and with poor baseline image quality, MCE and LVO were performed during DSE. Regional wall motion was assessed and inter-observer agreement was determined for each imaging modality. The endocardial border score index was similar for both modalities. The wall motion score index (WMSCI) at peak stress using MCE was well correlated with WMSCI obtained with LVO (r(2) = 0.9, P < 0.001). However, WMSCI at peak stress was underestimated by MCE (1.66 +/- 0.58 with DSE-LVO vs. 1.535 +/- 0.50 with DSE-MCE; P < 0.001). Inter-observer agreement on the presence of WMA was 0.65 for MCE and 0.67 for LVO at peak stress. Myocardial contrast perfusion echocardiography provides equal endocardial border delineation compared with LVO modality. Although the inter-observer agreement is slightly higher with LVO compared with MCE, it is not significantly different with MCE at peak stress. Despite the similar improvement in endocardial border delineation, LVO settings allow the detection of more WMA than MCE at peak stress, leading to a significantly higher accuracy for the detection of ischaemia in patients suspected of coronary artery disease when only wall motion is taken into account.
    European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging 09/2009; 10(8):956-60. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serotonergic drugs may lead to valvular heart disease in humans and more recently also in rats. Although clinical data suggest that dose dependency and reversibility after drug cessation might occur, proof of this is lacking. For that purpose, a total of 106 rats were prospectively enrolled: 22 control animals and 7 groups of 12 rats that received daily subcutaneous serotonin injections (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mg/kg respectively) for 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, half of the animals of each group were killed for histological analysis, whereas the remaining rats were further followed (without serotonin injections) for an additional 8 weeks. After 12 weeks of serotonin treatment, aortic and mitral regurgitation (AR, MR) were more frequently observed in the high dose groups (>30 mg/kg) compared to controls. Moreover, aortic and mitral valves were also thicker in the high dose groups compared to controls. After 8 weeks free of serotonin injections, AR and MR were no longer significantly higher than controls. Moreover, aortic and mitral valve thickness had normalized, returning to control levels. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for a dose-dependent valvular toxicity of serotonergic drugs, which appears to be reversible after drug withdrawal.
    Cardiovascular toxicology 07/2009; 9(3):134-41. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serotonergic drugs, such as pergolide, have been associated with the development of cardiac valvular myxoid thickening and regurgitation in humans and more recently in rats. These effects are potentially mediated by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2B) receptor (5-HT(2B)R). Therefore, we sought to determine whether cyproheptadine, a 5-HT(2B)R antagonist, might prevent toxic valvulopathy in an animal model of pergolide-induced valvular heart disease. For this purpose, 50 male Wistar rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of pergolide (0.5 mg/kg, n = 14), pergolide (0.5 mg/kg) combined with cyproheptadine (10 mg/kg, n = 12), cyproheptadine (10 mg/kg, n = 12), or no injections (control, n = 12) for 20 wk. Echocardiography was performed blindly at baseline and at 10 and 20 wk followed by pathology. At baseline, no differences between groups were found with echocardiography. At 20 wk, aortic regurgitation was present in all pergolide-treated animals, whereas it was less frequently observed in the other groups (P < 0.0001). For the other valves, this difference was less pronounced. On histopathology, not only aortic but also mitral valves were thicker, myxoid, and exhibited more 5-HT(2B)R-positive cells in pergolide-treated animals compared with the other groups. Moreover, regurgitant aortic and mitral valves were thicker than nonregurgitant aortic and mitral valves. In conclusion, we found that cyproheptadine prevented pergolide-induced valvulopathy in rats, which was associated with a reduced number of 5-HT(2B)R-positive valvular cells. This may have important clinical implications for the prevention of serotonergic drug-induced valvular heart disease.
    AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology 04/2009; 296(6):H1940-8. · 4.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aging is associated with morphologic and functional alterations of the rat's left ventricle. However, the time-course of valvular function and morphology in normal aging rats has not yet been studied. For this purpose, 30 male Wistar rats (318 +/- 5g, 10 weeks old) underwent serial echocardiograms for 58 weeks under sodium pentobarbital 50 mg/kg IP anesthetization followed by necropsy. Histopathology was also performed in two additional groups of 10 rats at 10 and 30 weeks of age. Regurgitations were considered as any retrograde flow on 2-D or M-mode color Doppler echocardiography. Tricuspid regurgitation was already found at 10 weeks of age and became more frequent with age. Pulmonary, mitral and aortic regurgitation was seldom observed at 10 weeks but became more frequent after 30 weeks. For the mitral and aortic valve, this was also associated with an increase in valvular thickness because of nodular or segmental myxoid leaflet changes. The severity of valvular regurgitations did not increase with age. In conclusion, aging leads to morphologic and functional valvular changes in normal rats. This is important when investigating models of valvular heart disease in small animals.
    Ultrasound in medicine & biology 01/2009; 35(4):558-65. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of structural and functional abnormalities of small vessels in diabetes cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Myocardial contrast echocardiography allows the quantification of myocardial blood flow at rest and during dipyridamole infusion. The aim of the study was to determine the myocardial blood flow reserve in normal rats compared with streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using contrast echocardiography. We prospectively studied 40 Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin in 20 rats. All rats underwent baseline and stress (dipyridamole: 20 mg/kg) high power intermittent imaging in short axis view under anaesthesia baseline and after six months. Myocardial blood flow was determined and compared at rest and after dipyridamole in both populations. The myocardial blood flow reserve was calculated and compared in the 2 groups. Parameters of left ventricular function were determined from the M-mode tracings and histological examination was performed in all rats at the end of the study. At six months, myocardial blood flow reserve was significantly lower in diabetic rats compared to controls (3.09 +/- 0.98 vs. 1.28 +/- 0.67 ml min-1 g-1; p < 0.05). There were also a significant decrease in left ventricular function and a decreased capillary surface area and diameter at histology in the diabetic group. In this animal study, diabetes induced a functional alteration of the coronary microcirculation, as demonstrated by contrast echocardiography, a decrease in capillary density and of the cardiac systolic function. These findings may offer new insights into the underlying mechanisms of diabetes cardiomyopathy.
    Cardiovascular Diabetology 09/2008; 7:26. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anesthetic agents have different effects on hemodynamic and cardiac functional parameters. The influence of these changes on valvular function has not been studied in small animals. For this purpose, 48 male Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups. An echocardiogram was performed under inhaled isoflurane 2% gas (group I) or under intraperitoneal pentobarbital 50 mg/kg (group II) or ketamine/xylazine (group III) 40/8 mg/kg. Aortic regurgitation was only found in group III (80%, p < 0.0001 vs. groups I and II). Pulmonary and mitral regurgitation (PR, MR) were observed in all groups but were more frequent in group III (PR 67%, MR 100%) compared with group I (PR 13%, p = 0.003; MR 44%, p = 0.001 vs. group III) and group II (PR 19%, p = 0.011; MR 25%, p < 0.0001 vs. group III). Moreover, valvular regurgitations in group III (except tricuspid regurgitation) were more severe compared with groups I and II. The findings in group III were the result of increased blood pressure and afterload, left ventricular (LV) dilation and decreased function. Also in group III, the regurgitations diminished over time as the blood pressure decreased and LV function recovered. Isoflurane and pentobarbital had less pronounced effects on valvular function (5 and 10 min after induction, respectively) compared with ketamine/xylazine and, therefore, might be the anesthetics of choice for valvular evaluation in male Wistar rats. In conclusion, anesthesia causes hemodynamic changes that may result in functional valvular regurgitations in normal rats.
    Ultrasound in medicine & biology 05/2008; 34(10):1564-72. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the biodistribution of purified CD133(+) cells after intracoronary injection in patients with stable chronic postinfarction heart failure. Patients with longstanding myocardial infarction (>12 months prior to inclusion) and with an accessible left coronary artery were eligible. CD133(+) cells were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and purified with a CliniMACS device. Cells were labeled with (111)Indium and injected through a balloon catheter in a coronary artery feeding the necrotic or viable infarct-related region of the left ventricle during a standard coronary catheterization procedure. The total body biodistribution of (111)Indium was studied with a dual-head gamma camera in combination with (99m)Technetium-sestaMIBI cardiac distribution analysis. The number of CD133(+) cells injected ranged between 5 and 10 x 10(6) cells (low dose, three patients) or between 18.5 and 50 x 10(6) cells (high dose, five patients). In the five patients receiving the higher cell doses, a clear residual radioactivity was observed at the level of the chronic injury at 2, 12, and up to 36 hours after injection. A detailed analysis in two patients showed 6.9% to 8.0% (after 2 hours) and 2.3% to 3.2% (after 12 hours) residual radioactivity at the heart. No adverse events were observed during the procedure and up to 3 months follow-up. We demonstrate that CD133(+) progenitor cells are capable of homing to the postinfarction remodeling myocardium after intracoronary injections in patients with chronic postinfarction heart failure.
    Experimental Hematology 12/2007; 35(12):1884-90. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Valvular heart disease, inducing valvular regurgitation, has been described in users of drugs such as anorectic agents and ergot derivates. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") also leads in vitro to the proliferation of cardiac valvular interstitial cells by activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 2B receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of valvulopathy in young adults taking MDMA. Twenty-nine subjects using or having used MDMA and 29 gender- and age-matched controls were blindly evaluated with echocardiography. Eight subjects (28%) who took MDMA had abnormal echocardiographic results using the United States Food and Drug Administration's criteria for appetite suppressant-induced valvular heart disease, compared with none in the control group (p = 0.0045). Six (21%) subjects had mitral regurgitation of 1/4 and 4 (14%) of > or =2/4, compared with none in the control group (p = 0.002). The mean mitral regurgitant area ratios (jet/atrium) were 12 +/- 9.8% and 5 +/- 1.3%, respectively (p = 0.007). Tricuspid regurgitation > or =2/4 was present in 13 MDMA users (45%) and absent in controls (p <0.001). The mean tricuspid regurgitant area ratios were 19 +/- 9.5% and 9 +/- 4.5%, respectively (p <0.001). Four MDMA users (14%) had mild aortic regurgitation (p = 0.11). Valvular "strands" were present in 6 MDMA users (21%) and in none of the controls (p = 0.02). In conclusion, MDMA may lead to mild to moderate valvular heart disease and valvular strands.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 11/2007; 100(9):1442-5. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Valvular heart disease (VHD), inducing valvular regurgitation, has been described in carcinoid heart disease and recently in Parkinson's patients treated with pergolide. The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo model of drug-induced valvulopathy with pergolide in rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were given daily injections of either pergolide (0.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) (n = 8), serotonin (20 mg/kg subcutaneously) (n = 8), or the vehicle only (n = 14) for 5 months. At 20 weeks, echocardiography demonstrated the presence of aortic regurgitation (AR) and/or mitral regurgitation (MR) in serotonin (86% AR, P = 0.0001; 57% MR, P = 0.006) and in pergolide animals (67% AR, P = 0.003; 67% MR, P = 0.003) compared with none in placebo. Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) and tricuspid regurgitation (TR) were found in the serotonin (71% PR, P = 0.19; 100% TR, P = 0.06 vs. placebo), pergolide (100% PR, P = 0.014; 83% TR, P = 0.35 vs. placebo), and placebo groups (36% PR; 57% TR). Tricuspid regurgitant area ratio (jet/atrium), however, was more severe in the serotonin [median 26.5 (range 17-42)%; P = 0.02] and pergolide animals [32 (17-39) %; P = 0.03] compared with placebo [12.5 (5-33)%]. We found a good correlation between valvular regurgitation and histologically assessed valvular thickness. Histological examination revealed the presence of diffusely thickened and myxoid aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves in serotonin and pergolide animals as seen in VHD. We demonstrated, for the first time, that long-term pergolide administration led to VHD in rats. This small animal model will permit further in vivo investigation of drug-induced valvulopathies.
    European Heart Journal 10/2007; 28(17):2156-62. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has been shown to be a very useful non-invasive technique for the detection of coronary artery disease. However, inadequate transthoracic images preclude the use of DSE in a significant proportion of patients. Transesophageal (TEE) or transthoracic contrast echocardiography (CE) can however overcome this limitation. The comparison between the two techniques has never been investigated during a stress test. Therefore, we designed a prospective study to compare DSE-CE and DSE-TEE for the detection of coronary artery disease in patients with poor echo image quality. We studied 42 patients scheduled for quantitative coronary angiography. Prospective DSE-CE and DSE-TEE with maximum one day interval were performed in a random order. Significant coronary artery disease was detected in 30 patients, nine with single vessel disease and 21 with multivessel disease. Sensitivity of DSE was higher with CE than with TEE (90% vs 87%, p=NS). There was no significant difference with respect to specificity in both groups (100% vs 92%, p=NS). The diagnostic accuracy was similar in both groups (93% vs 88%, NS). The kappa value for identical interpretation of a stress echocardiography study was nearly identical with both modalities 0.75 to 0.78. In poorly echogenic patients, DSE-CE is a valuable alternative for the detection of myocardial ischemia in comparison with DSE-TEE. Because DSE-CE is more comfortable than TEE, it should be used in patients with suboptimal transthoracic echocardiograms for the evaluation of coronary artery disease during DSE.
    International journal of cardiology 09/2007; 129(1):105-10. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stem cell homing to injured tissue is necessary for local tissue repair. But homing of stem cells in chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD) is poorly understood. This study investigated homing of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) expressing the CD133 antigen. After intracoronary injection. The cells were (111)In labeled for in vivo visualization. PBSC were mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and collected by apheresis on d-1. On d0, CD133+ cells were enriched up to a median purity of 89% (range: 79-97%) with an immunomagnetic separation device (CliniMACS, Miltenyi). A fraction of the cells was radiolabeled with [(111)In]oxine in 0.1 M TRIS at pH 7.4 for 45-60 min. Cell viability after labeling was assessed using trypan-blue. The cells were injected at a radioactive concentration of 0.9 MBq/10(6) cells into the target open coronary vessel through a balloon catheter. During balloon inflation [(99m)Tc]sestamibi was injected intravenously to identify the myocardium and the target vascular territory. Eight patients (mean age: 53 years; range: 50-72 years) with stable CIHD and reduced left ventricular function (NYHA class I-II) after acute myocardial infarction (>12 months) were studied. After a first cohort of 3 patients received an injectate of 5-10 x 10(6) cells, our final protocol was applied in 5 patients in whom an average of 34.4 x 10(6) (range: 18.6-49.4) CD133+ cells was injected. Whole body and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans were acquired at different time points after injection (energy windows set at 140, 171 and 245 keV). Residual activity in the heart was assessed by drawing a region of interest around the heart on the anterior whole body views. Mean labeling efficiency of [111In]oxine labeling was 51.2% and cell viability after labeling averaged 88%. In the 5 patients receiving the higher amount of labeled cells, a clear (111)In-signal was observed in the heart region up to 3 days after administration. Fused [(99m)Tc]sestamibi/(111)In SPECT images demonstrated that the regional distribution of the transplanted cells within the target zone, as delineated by the flow tracer, remained unchanged over time. A biodistribution study in 2 patients showed a residual activity in the heart, liver and spleen of 6.9-8%, 23.1-26.8%, 3.1-3.7%, respectively, after 1-2 h and 2.3-3.2% 23.8-28.3%, 3.5-3.8%, respectively, after 12 h (decay corrected and expressed as a percentage of total body initial activity). No adverse events were observed during the procedure and up to 3 months follow-up. Radiolabeling with [(111)In]oxine is a suitable method for follow-up of cell distribution during the first days after transplantation. A significant amount of CD133+ PBSC home to the heart after intracoronary injection in patients with CIHD. The results of this study are useful for the design of trials that evaluate the tissue repair potential of CD133+ PBSC in the setting of CIHD.
    The quarterly journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging: official publication of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) [and] the International Association of Radiopharmacology (IAR), [and] Section of the Society of... 03/2007; 51(1):61-6. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM) may cause left ventricular (LV) dysfunction directly resulting in increased susceptibility to heart failure. Using pinhole collimators and advances in data processing, gated SPECT was recently adapted to image the rat heart. The present study was aimed to assess this new imaging technique for quantifying LV function and remodeling from the Streptozotocin (STZ) rat model compared to controls. Twenty one rats were randomly assigned to control or diabetic group. Six months after the induction of diabetes by STZ, Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT was performed for determining rat LV volumes and function. Post-mortem histopathologic analysis was performed to evaluate the determinant of LV remodeling in this model. After six months, the normalized to body weight LV End-systolic volume was significantly different in diabetic rats compared to controls (0.46 +/- 0.02 vs 0.33 +/- 0.03 microL/g; p = 0.01). The normalized LV End-diastolic volume was also different in both groups (1.51 +/- 0.03 vs 0.88 +/- 0.05 microL/g; p = 0.001) and the normalized stroke volume was significantly higher in STZ-rats (1.05 +/- 0.02 vs 0.54 +/- 0.06 microL/g; p = 0.001). The muscular fibers were thinner at histology in the diabetic rats (0.44 +/- 0.07 vs 0.32 +/- 0.06 AU; p = 0.01). Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT can successfully be applied for the evaluation of cardiac function and remodeling in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this model, LV volumes were significantly changed compared to a control population, leading to a LV dysfunction. These findings were consistent with the histopathological abnormalities. Finally, these data further suggest the presence of diabetes cardiomyopathy.
    Cardiovascular Diabetology 02/2007; 6:30. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging 12/2006; · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging 12/2006; · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been previously suggested that simultaneous exposure of hearts to contrast and ultrasound can damage the myocardium and produce a transient decrease of the contractility in animals. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a useful tool to quantify the myocardial function with very high temporal resolution. The aim of the study was to test whether contrast echocardiography (CE) can cause alteration of the myocardial function by using tissue Doppler analysis. Twenty-eight healthy patients (mean age: 44 +/- 22) underwent baseline echocardiography before and after 5 min of continuous intravenous infusion of Sonovue from the apical views, using an intermediate mechanical index (MI = 1). High frame rate images were acquired in tissue Doppler mode. Data were averaged over 3 cardiac cycles and analysed off-line before and after CE. There were no significant changes, before and after CE, in the peak systolic velocity (basal septum (BS): 6.2 +/- 2.2 vs 6.4 +/- 2.6; basal lateral (BL): 6.2 +/- 3.1 vs 6.4 +/- 3.3 cm/s), in the peak diastolic E velocity (BS: 5.4+/-1.8 vs 5.3+/-1.7; BL: 7.3+/-2.4 vs 7.7 +/- 3.2 cm/s), in the peak diastolic A velocity (BS: 6.3 +/- 1.9 vs 6.9 +/- 2.4; BL: 6.1 +/- 3.5 vs 6.2 +/- 2.5 cm/s), in the peak systolic strain (BS: 16 +/- 7 vs 17 +/- 7; BL: 12.6 +/- 5 vs 12.9 +/- 5%) and in peak systolic strain rate (BS: 1.3+/-0.6 vs 1.4+/-0.6; BL: 1.2+/-0.5 vs 1.21+/-0.51 1/sec). Our data suggest that CE does not cause alterations in the myocardial function as assessed by tissue Doppler imaging. CE, even with high MI settings, usually used for left ventricular opacification, can be safely performed.
    European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging 09/2005; 6(4):238-42. · 3.67 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

505 Citations
210.53 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2014
    • University Hospital Brussels
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 1997–2009
    • Free University of Brussels
      • • Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy
      • • Department of Cardiology
      • • Nuclear Medicine (NUGE)
      Brussels, BRU, Belgium
  • 2007
    • Universitair Ziekenhuis Leuven
      • Department of Cardiology
      Louvain, Flanders, Belgium