Om Tantia

Medical College Kolkata, Kolkata, Bengal, India

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Publications (27)29.53 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diaphragmatic hernia through the central tendon is a very rare entity. We report on a case that developed to acute intestinal obstruction, secondary to herniation of the small intestine through a small defect in the central tendon of the diaphragm. The patient never had any trauma to his chest or abdomen and had no history suggestive of congenital nature of the diaphragmatic hernia. However, he had coronary artery bypass grafting with saphenous vein used as a graft, done almost 17 years back; hence, we suspect it to be an iatrogenic hernia. A laparoscopic herniorrhaphy of the diaphragmatic defect was carried out after reducing the herniated organ. The postoperative course was uneventful. Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernias are a very rare entity. We are reporting on a central tendon hernial defect in the diaphragm after coronary artery bypass with saphenous vein as a graft material. There are reported cases with post coronary artery bypass graft diaphragmatic hernia in which the right gastroepiploic artery was taken as the graft material. Late diagnosis of iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernias is frequent. CT scan is helpful for diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of diaphragmatic hernia at the time of diagnosis, even with asymptomatic patients.
    The Indian journal of surgery. 06/2014; 76(3):234-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) was initially performed as the first stage of biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch for the treatment of super-obese or high-risk obese patients but is now most commonly performed as a standalone operation. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate outcomes after LSG according to resected stomach volume. Between May 2011 and April 2013, LSG was performed in 102 consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Two patients were excluded, and data from the remaining 100 patients were analyzed in this study. Patients were divided into three groups according to the following resected stomach volume: 700-1,200 mL (group A, n = 21), 1,200-1,700 mL (group B, n = 62), and >1,700 mL (group C, n = 17). Mean values were compared among the groups by analysis of variance. The mean percentage excess body weight loss (%EBWL) at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 37.68 ± 10.97, 50.97 ± 13.59, 62.35 ± 11.31, and 67.59 ± 9.02 %, respectively. There were no significant differences in mean %EBWL among the three groups. Resected stomach volume was greater in patients with higher preoperative body mass index and was positively associated with resected stomach weight. Mean %EBWL after LSG was not significantly different among three groups of patients divided according to resected stomach volume. Resected stomach volume was significantly greater in patients with higher preoperative body mass index.
    Obesity Surgery 05/2014; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Omental gangrene is an infrequent cause of acute abdomen with unclear etiology. Hypercoagualable states like protein C or protein S deficiency have never been implicated in the etiology of omental gangrene. We present this case report of a patient having protein C and protein S deficiency presenting with omental gangrene and extensive porto mesenteric thrombosis.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 06/2013; 75(1). · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Right-sided Bochdalek hernia in adults is a very rare clinical entity. A case of a 50-year-old female patient is reported, who presented with long history of intermittent breathlessness and right-sided thoracoabdominal pain. The hernia was managed laparoscopically. Contents were colon, omentum, and right kidney. It was successfully repaired using a polypropylene mesh.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 06/2013; 75(1). · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various colonic side-effects of herbal enema have been reported in literature ranging from mild abdominal discomfort to self-limiting haemorrhagic colitis. It rarely requires blood transfusion or subtotal colectomy. We report a 57-year-old male patient developing severe ileo-colitis with persistent massive rectal bleeding immediately after herbal enema administration for the treatment of chronic constipation and was resistant to conservative management. Patient was managed successfully with emergency total laparoscopic colectomy. Post-operative recovery of the patient was excellent.
    Journal of Minimal Access Surgery 07/2012; 8(3):104-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become very popular nowadays among bariatric surgeons because of its surgical simplicity and good postoperative results. We present our experience on LSG as a single stage primary bariatric procedure for morbid obesity and its 1-3-year follow-up results. Between March 2008 and March 2011, a total of 110 patients underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Two patients were excluded from the study and thus the prospectively maintained data of 108 patients were retrospectively reviewed and outcomes were recorded. The mean patient age was 39.3 ± 11.1 years, mean body mass index was 44.5 ± 6.8, mean excess body weight was 54.1 ± 16.3 kg, and the mean American Society of Anesthesiologists score was 3.1 ± 0.57. The mean operative time for the LSG procedure was 64.8 ± 10.6 min. The minimum follow-up duration was 6 months and maximum of 36 months. The mean postoperative percent excess body weight loss achieved was 67.5 ± 13.0 at 1 year, 71.1 ± 13.8 at 2 years, and 66.09 ± 14.3 at 3 years. At the end of 3 years, there was 83.3% resolution in diabetes, 85.7% resolution in hypertension, and 85.71% resolution in dyslipidemia. There were no reports of postoperative hemorrhage, gastric leak, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, delayed gastric tube stricture, and operative mortality. LSG is a safe and effective bariatric procedure with low perioperative complications. Before it is considered as a single stage primary procedure, a long-term prospective comparative study with other bariatric procedures is required.
    Obesity Surgery 03/2012; 22(3):507-14. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with preperitoneal placement of mesh minimizes the complications related to the intraperitoneal position of mesh and fixating devices. It allows safe use of conventional and less expensive polypropylene mesh. The prospectively collected data of 68 patients who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal mesh hernioplasty, for different types of ventral hernias between January 2005 and December 2009 was retrospectively reviewed. The study included 68 patients, 16 males and 52 females with a mean age 51.1 ± 11.1 years (range 23-74 years). Most of the hernias (67.6%) were in the midline position. The mean size of the defect was 30.8 ± 24.4 cm2 (range, 4-144 cm2) and the mean mesh size was 237.8 ± 66.8 cm2 (range, 144-484 cm2). The mean operating time was 96.7 ± 16.7 min (range 70-150 min). All repairs were done with polypropylene mesh. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 1.5 ± 0.6 days (range, 1-4 days). Nineteen patients (27.9%) suffered from postoperative complications. Four patients (5.8%) were detected to have seroma formation. There were two recurrences (2.9%). The mean follow up was 22.7 ± 13.4 months (range, 6-48 months). The laparoscopic preperitoneal ventral hernia repair with polypropylene mesh is cheaper and has acceptable postoperative outcomes. Peritoneal coverage of the mesh not only acts as a barrier between mesh and bowel and thereby prevents adhesions, it also provides an additional security of fixation. This is a safe and feasible option of ventral hernia repair in expert hands. However, for proper validation of these conclusions a long term prospective clinical trial is required.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 12/2011; 73(6):403-8. · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is evolving rapidly worldwide to become a standard procedure. The purpose of this study was to compare the benefits, effectiveness, and postoperative outcome of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of ventral hernia. Prospectively collected data of 279 patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair between January 2005 and December 2009, of whom 68 underwent TAPP and 211 underwent IPOM repair, were retrospectively reviewed. For each patient demographic, preoperative and postoperative data were studied. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test, Fisher exact test, and chi-square test. The study included a total of 279 patients, of whom 68 underwent TAPP procedure and 211 underwent IPOM procedure. Both the groups were comparable in age, sex, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, mean fascial defect size, and mean size of mesh. Although the operating time was longer in TAPP group than IPOM group of patients, the overall cost of surgery in IPOM group ($752.3±355.7) was much higher than TAPP group ($903.6±28.0) of patients. Seroma formation was more common in IPOM group than TAPP group (8.5% versus 5.8%). There were 2 (2.9%) recurrences in TAPP group and 7 (3.3%) in IPOM group of patients. Mean postoperative hospital stay (1.5±0.6 versus 1.4±0.7 days, P=.35) and mean follow-up (22.7±13.4 versus 22.5±11.9 months, P=.90) were similar in both groups of patients. Besides the cost-effectiveness of TAPP procedure, it reduces the risk of complication related to intra-abdominal position of mesh and fixating devices. Before we label the TAPP repair of ventral hernia as the first choice, a comparative multicentric prospective trial with IPOM repair is warranted.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 05/2011; 21(6):477-83. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sliding hernias are an uncommon type of inguinal hernia. Very little is published in the literature regarding the outcome of laparoscopic repair of sliding hernia. The present series evaluates the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic repair of these hernias. Retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained data of patients with sliding inguinal hernia undergoing laparoscopic repair from January 2003 to July 2010 was done. The patient demographics, clinical presentations, operative details, and complications were studied. Related literature was reviewed. A total of 1136 patients underwent laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia, of which 54 patients had sliding inguinal hernia (4.7%). Forty-one patients (76%) had left-sided hernia and 13 patients (24%) had right-sided hernias. Mean age of presentation was 63.5 years. Thirty-five patients (64.8%) presented as complicated hernias (27 irreducible, 7 obstructed, and 1 strangulated). Thirty-nine patients had sigmoid colon, 9 patients had cecum, 3 patients had ascending colon, and 3 patients had urinary bladder as the sliding component. Eight patients underwent Lichtenstein repair, 27 patients transabdominal preperitoneal repair, and 19 patients total extraperitoneal repair. Mean operating time of laparoscopic repair was 53 minutes (40-105 minutes). Five procedures (10.8%) were converted to open repair. Overall morbidity was 44.4%. Median hospital stay was 1.5 days (1-14 days). There were no recurrences in up to 7 years follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of sliding inguinal hernia is feasible and safe with good outcome. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach is the preferable method.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 04/2011; 21(3):227-31. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the standard procedure for symptomatic gall stone disease. Situs inversus is a condition where the visceral anatomy is reversed. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient of situs inversus is a technically difficult procedure. Six patients of situs inversus underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy from January 2003 to December 2009. In the first patient of situs inversus, we operated by placing the ports in mirror image fashion as that of standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However in next five patients we modified the technique by interchanging the epigastric and left mid clavicular line ports to overcome the problem of handedness. The procedure was successfully completed in all six patients. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. The mean operating time was 65 mins (45-85 mins). Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe in patients of situs inversus. However, extreme care and skill is required to identify the reversed anatomy and to overcome the problem of handedness. Interchanging the epigastric and left mid clavicular line ports makes the procedure easier.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 10/2010; 72(5):391-4. · 0.09 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the Indian Medical Association 10/2010; 108(10):667-8, 671.
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    ABSTRACT: The differential diagnosis of chronic groin pain in athletes is a long list and its evaluation is a challenging task. Sports hernia, one of the common cause of these groin pains, had been managed both with open & endoscopic repairs in the past. We report a case of sports hernia in young footballer who presented with bilateral groin pain for 5 years. Endoscopic hernioplasty was done (by totally extra-peritoneal technique) which identified bilateral occult femoral hernia and were repaired simultaneously. Post op outcome was good with excellent results.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 08/2010; 72(4):343-6. · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic splenectomy has become a standard treatment of various haematological disorders, but its feasibility in the setting of β thalassemia has not been established. Fifty patients of β thalassemia underwent laparoscopic splenectomy between January 2006 and December 2008. "Anterior approach" method was practiced in all cases, with early ligation of splenic artery and delayed ligation of splenic vein. Specimen was extracted piecemeal via the umbilical port in initial 12 cases, while in 37 cases the specimen was extracted through a 7-8-cm pfannenstiel incision. Twelve patients of β thalassemia having grade IV splenomegaly with hepatomegaly were electively operated by conventional open method. The procedure was completed in 49 patients. One (2%) patient required conversion to open surgery. Mean operating time in the first 12 cases was 151 minutes (110-210 minutes), while in 37 cases of splenectomy completed laparoscopically it was 124 minutes (80-190 minutes) [P < 0.05]. Mean intra-operative blood loss was 73.8 ml (30-520 ml). No major intra-operative complications occurred. No patient required per-operative blood transfusion. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.7 days (2-11 days). Mean preoperative blood transfusion requirement was 11.98 units per patient per year, while mean postoperative blood transfusion requirement was 4.04 units [P< 0.05]. Laparoscopic splenectomy is feasible and safe even in patients of β thalassemia with massive splenomegaly. Removal of specimen via a pfannenstiel incision significantly saves time, carries low morbidity and is a cosmetically acceptable alternative.
    Journal of Minimal Access Surgery 07/2010; 6(3):70-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular disturbances of the omentum, described variously as acute epiploitis, primary omental torsion, idiopathic segmental infarction, etc., is an infrequent cause of acute abdomen, often mimicking acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, or pancreatitis. In this retrospective article, we share our experiences about the incidence, diagnostic dilemma, and management of patients with omental torsion or infarction and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic role of laparoscopy. From January 2003 to December 2008, 9 patients (7 men and 2 women; median age, 26 years; range, 5-71) with omental gangrene, including omental torsion and infarction, were operated on at our institute. Of these, 8 patients had a preoperative provisional diagnosis of acute appendicitis and 1 patient of acute calculus cholecystitis. During this period, a total of 1502 patients were diagnosed and operated on laparoscopically for acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis. Of them, 2 patients were intraoperatively diagnosed to have omental torsion and 7 patients had segmental omental infarction. Incidences of omental gangrene presenting as acute cholecystitis and acute appendicitis were 0.11 and 1.1%, respectively. The suspected preoperative pathology was grossly normal, and histopathology of the same was noncontributory to the cause of acute abdomen. All 9 cases were managed laparoscopically, with the gangrenous omentum excised along with appendectomy in 8 patients and cholecystectomy in 1 patient. In conclusion, inspection of the omentum should be a routine part of exploration in suspected acute appendicitis.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 02/2010; 20(3):225-9. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spigelian hernias are rare abdominal wall hernias occurring through a defect in the spigelian fascia lateral to the semilunar lines and pose great difficulty in diagnosis due to their location and varied presentations. The treatment of spigelian hernia has evolved from open surgical repair to laparoscopic hernioplasty. In this article, we share our experience of 6 patients with spigelian hernia managed by laparoscopic mesh repair and review the related literature on the topic. A retrospective data collection of patients of spigelian hernia operated on between January 2005 and December 2008 was done. The data were evaluated regarding patient presentation, age group, methods of surgical repair, and the outcome of the procedures. The patients had follow-up at 1 week, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the surgery and were evaluated for any recurrence or mesh-related complications. In total, 6 patients of spigelian hernia were operated on in 4 years, from January 2005 to December 2008, with most of them presenting with either a lump or pain. All patients were operated by the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) method with satisfactory results. No recurrences were found in 2 years of follow-up. Laparoscopic TAPP is an acceptable method of spigelian hernia repair with good results and low recurrence rates. However, long-term follow-up studies are required to assess the late recurrence rate.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 02/2010; 20(2):129-33. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A tablet induced perforation of a caecal diverticulum into a hernial sac is a rare happening. The report discusses the presentation and outcome of a patient with such an unusual disease. A 55-year-old man presented with features of irreducible right sided indirect inguinal hernia. A hard swelling near upper pole of right testis was noted. Scrotal ultrasound revealed a normal testis. At operation caecum and proximal ascending colon were found in the hernial sac with the caecum adherent to the testis. As caecal malignancy could not be ruled out and enbloc Rt Haemicolectomy with Rt orchidectomy was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Pathological examination of the specimen revealed a perforated caecal diverticulum with presence of multiple tablets in its lumen invaginating the upper pole of right testis without any evidence of malignancy. Tablet induced perforation of a caecal diverticulum into a hernial sac is a rare clinical entity. If malignancy cannot be negated at operation, a right haemicolectomy is a safe and feasible option.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 10/2009; 71(5):276-8. · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Repair of groin and ventral hernias are among the technically difficult endoscopic procedures where the role of laparoscopic surgery is fast emerging. We have designed a laparoscopic simulator trainer box for hernia surgery, which closely mimics the complex endoscopic procedure, and good results can be achieved by training on these trainer boxes. The endotrainer box was self-designed to repair bilateral groin hernia, and an incisional hernia, such that it can be used for multiple repairs. Forty candidates were trained with the trainer box for 2 days over two hernia training programs, and an objective assessment of the result was done by global and task-specific scoring for transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of groin and incisional hernia, respectively. There was a significant improvement in the global (10.15 on day 1 and 12.85 on day 2) and task-specific score for TAPP (3.55 on day 1 and 5.83 on day 2) and IPOM repair (4.4 on day 1 and 6.4 on day 2). Cheaper endotrainer boxes can be self-designed for complex endoscopic surgeries such as hernia repair. The training with these trainer boxes under the supervision of experienced surgeons shows good results and can be used for surgical residents and practicing surgeons who are exposed to basic laparoscopic skills.
    Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques 09/2009; 19(4):535-40. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), a common laparoscopic procedure, is a relatively safe invasive procedure, but complications can occur at every step, starting from creation of the pneumoperitoneum. Several studies have investigated procedure-related complications, but the primary access- or trocar-related complications generally are underreported, and their true incidence may be higher than studies show. Major vascular or visceral injury resulting from blind access to the abdominal cavity, although rare, has been reported. Of the two methods for creating pneumoperitoneum, the open access technique is reported to have the lower incidence of these injuries. The authors report their experience with the closed method and show that if performed with proper technique, it can be as rapid and safe as other techniques. However, injuries still happen, and the search for the predisposing factors must be continued. Between January 1992 and December 2007, a retrospective study examined 15,260 cases of LC performed for symptomatic gallstone disease in the authors' institution by a single team of surgeons. The primary access-related injuries in these cases were retrospectively analyzed. In 15,260 cases of LC, 63 cases of primary access-related complications were identified, for an overall incidence of 0.41%. Major injuries in 11 cases included major vascular and visceral injuries, and minor injuries in 52 cases included omental and subcutaneous emphysema. For the closed method, the findings showed an overall incidence of 0.14% for primary access-related vascular injuries and 0.07% for visceral injuries. Primary access-related complications during LC are common and can prove to be fatal if not identified early. The incidence of these injuries with closed methods is no greater than with open methods. No evidence suggests abandonment of the closed-entry method in laparoscopy.
    Surgical Endoscopy 04/2009; 23(11):2407-15. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrences continue to be seen after repair of inguinal hernias. The repair of these recurrent hernias is a more complex and demanding procedure, with a high re-recurrence rate. Definite advantage has been demonstrated with endoscopic repair of these hernias. The results for this prospective study from January 2003 to December 2006 were evaluated after laparoscopic repair of 65 recurrent hernias in 61 patients. The patients were followed up for 1 year. Longer follow-up evaluation was performed for the patients who underwent surgery in the initial 3 years. In this study, 37 recurrent hernias were managed using the transabdominal preperitoneal technique (TAPP) technique and 28 using the totally extraperitoneal (TEP) technique. There was no conversion and no cases of postoperative wound infection. Of the 12 metachronous hernias repaired simultaneously, 3 were occult. Seroma developed in five patients. At a follow-up assessment after 1 year, one patient had groin pain, and there was one re-recurrence. A longer follow-up period with a mean of 35.11 months failed to show any new re-recurrence. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernia is safe and effective. The morbidity and recurrence rates for the procedure are as low as for laparoscopic repair of primary hernias. Laparoscopic repair should be the gold standard for these hernias.
    Surgical Endoscopy 08/2008; 23(4):734-8. · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • O Tantia, M Jain, S Khanna, B Sen
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    ABSTRACT: Biliary injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) are complications better avoided than treated. These injuries cause long-lasting morbidity and can be fatal. The authors present their experience with biliary injury in LC during a period exceeding 13 years. Between January 1992 and December 2005, 13,305 LCs were performed at the authors' institution. The biliary injuries in these cases were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. A total of 52 biliary injuries were identified in 13,305 LCs, for an overall incidence of 0.39%. Of these, 32 (0.24%) were diagnosed intraoperatively and 20 (0.15%) were diagnosed postoperatively. The perioperative bile duct injuries (BDIs) included 6 complete transections (5 treated by hepaticojejunostomy and 1 by primary T-tube repair (TTR), all performed by conversion to open procedure), 11 lateral BDIs (2 treated by laparoscopic choledochojejunostomy [CJ], 1 by open CJ, 5 by laparoscopic TTR, 1 by open TTR, and 2 by primary suture repair, both performed laparoscopically), 11 duct of Luschka injuries, and 4 sectoral duct injuries. The BDIs detected postoperatively included 6 patients with bilioma (treated with ultrasonography-guided aspiration), 4 patients with biliary peritonitis (requiring relaparoscopy and peritoneal lavage and drainage followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography [ERC] and biliary stenting), and 10 patients with persistent biliary leak-controlled biliary fistula (requiring ERC and stenting). There was no mortality related to BDI in the series. Patients with Strasberg type A/C/D injuries (46 cases) were followed 3 months to 3 years with no major complaints. Two patients with complete transection were lost to follow-up evaluation, whereas the other four patients, followed 18 months to 3 years, were asymptomatic. According to the findings, LC is a safe procedure with an incidence of biliary injury comparable with that for open cholecystectomy. Single-center studies such as this are important to ensure that standards of surgery are maintained in the community.
    Surgical Endoscopy 05/2008; 22(4):1077-86. · 3.43 Impact Factor