J E Pérez-Ortín

Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, Vila Real, Portugal

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Publications (42)194.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide analysis of the wine yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC4072 identified 36 genes highly expressed under conditions of low or absent nitrogen in comparison with a nitrogen-replete condition. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis for four of these transcripts with this strain and its validation with another wine yeast strain underlines the usefulness of these signature genes for predicting nitrogen deficiency and therefore the diagnosis of wine stuck/sluggish fermentations.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 09/2007; 73(16):5363-9. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene expression profiles of a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC4072 were monitored during alcoholic fermentations with three different nitrogen supplies: (i) control fermentation (with enough nitrogen to complete sugar fermentation), (ii) nitrogen-limiting fermentation, and (iii) the addition of nitrogen to the nitrogen-limiting fermentation (refed fermentation). Approximately 70% of the yeast transcriptome was altered in at least one of the fermentation stages studied, revealing the continuous adjustment of yeast cells to stressful conditions. Nitrogen concentration had a decisive effect on gene expression during fermentation. The largest changes in transcription profiles were observed when the early time points of the N-limiting and control fermentations were compared. Despite the high levels of glucose present in the media, the early responses of yeast cells to low nitrogen were characterized by the induction of genes involved in oxidative glucose metabolism, including a significant number of mitochondrial associated genes resembling the yeast cell response to glucose starvation. As the N-limiting fermentation progressed, a general downregulation of genes associated with catabolism was observed. Surprisingly, genes encoding ribosomal proteins and involved in ribosome biogenesis showed a slight increase during N starvation; besides, genes that comprise the RiBi regulon behaved distinctively under the different experimental conditions. Here, for the first time, the global response of nitrogen-depleted cells to nitrogen addition under enological conditions is described. An important gene expression reprogramming occurred after nitrogen addition; this reprogramming affected genes involved in glycolysis, thiamine metabolism, and energy pathways, which enabled the yeast strain to overcome the previous nitrogen starvation stress and restart alcoholic fermentation.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 06/2007; 73(9):3049-60. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Comprehensive Yeast Genome Database (CYGD) compiles a comprehensive data resource for information on the cellular functions of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, chosen as the best understood model organism for eukaryotes. The database serves as a common resource generated by a European consortium, going beyond the provision of sequence information and functional annotations on individual genes and proteins. In addition, it provides information on the physical and functional interactions among proteins as well as other genetic elements. These cellular networks include metabolic and regulatory pathways, signal transduction and transport processes as well as co-regulated gene clusters. As more yeast genomes are published, their annotation becomes greatly facilitated using S.cerevisiae as a reference. CYGD provides a way of exploring related genomes with the aid of the S.cerevisiae genome as a backbone and SIMAP, the Similarity Matrix of Proteins. The comprehensive resource is available under http://mips.gsf.de/genre/proj/yeast/.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2005; 33(Database issue):D364-8. · 8.81 Impact Factor
  • Yeast 01/2003; 20:S96-S96. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a yeast two-hybrid assay we detected an interaction between the N-terminal region of histone H4 (amino acids 1--59) and a fragment of the bromodomain factor 1 protein (Bdf1p) (amino acids 304--571) that includes one of the two bromodomains of this protein. No interaction was observed using fragments of histone H4 sequence smaller than the first 59 amino acids. Recombinant Bdf1p (rBdf1p) demonstrates binding affinity for histones H4 and H3 but not H2A and H2B in vitro. Moreover, rBdf1p is able to bind histones H3 and H4 having different degrees of acetylation. Finally, we have not detected histone acetyltransferase activity associated with Bdf1p.
    FEBS Letters 06/2001; 496(1):31-5. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • S Puig, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: Promoters from glycolytic genes are widely used for gene overexpression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Wine strains are not an exception, and genes of enological interest have been expressed in this way. However, the transcriptional pattern of glycolytic genes has never been studied during wine fermentation. In this work we describe the levels and expression patterns of glycolytic genes for a wine yeast strain during the alcoholic fermentation of three different musts. Results show similar transcriptional patterns for all genes studied: maximal levels of mRNA at the exponential growth stage, and a gradual decrease during the stationary phase, in accordance with the fermentation rates. The glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes reach the highest transcriptional levels during wine fermentation, similarly as previously described for laboratory strains and conditions.
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology 07/2000; 23(2):300-3. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    S Puig, A Querol, E Barrio, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: Natural strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are prototrophic homothallic yeasts that sporulate poorly, are often heterozygous, and may be aneuploid. This genomic constitution may confer selective advantages in some environments. Different mechanisms of recombination, such as meiosis or mitotic rearrangement of chromosomes, have been proposed for wine strains. We studied the stability of the URA3 locus of a URA3/ura3 wine yeast in consecutive grape must fermentations. ura3/ura3 homozygotes were detected at a rate of 1 x 10(-5) to 3 x 10(-5) per generation, and mitotic rearrangements for chromosomes VIII and XII appeared after 30 mitotic divisions. We used the karyotype as a meiotic marker and determined that sporulation was not involved in this process. Thus, we propose a hypothesis for the genome changes in wine yeasts during vinification. This putative mechanism involves mitotic recombination between homologous sequences and does not necessarily imply meiosis.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 06/2000; 66(5):2057-61. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    J van Helden, M del Olmo, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: The study of a few genes has permitted the identification of three elements that constitute a yeast polyadenyl-ation signal: the efficiency element (EE), the positioning element and the actual site for cleavage and poly-adenyl-ation. In this paper we perform an analysis of oligonucleotide composition on the sequences located downstream of the stop codon of all yeast genes. Several oligonucleotide families appear over-represented with a high significance (referred to herein as 'words'). The family with the highest over-representation includes the oligonucleotides shown experimentally to play a role as EEs. The word with the highest score is TATATA, followed, among others, by a series of single-nucleotide variants (TATGTA, TACATA, TAAATA.) and one-letter shifts (ATATAT). A position analysis reveals that those words have a high preference to be in 3' flanks of yeast genes and there they have a very uneven distribution, with a marked peak around 35 bp after the stop codon. Of the predicted ORFs, 85% show one or more of those sequences. Similar results were obtained using a data set of EST sequences. Other clusters of over-represented words are also detected, namely T- and A-rich signals. Using these results and previously known data we propose a general model for the 3' trailers of yeast mRNAs.
    Nucleic Acids Research 03/2000; 28(4):1000-10. · 8.81 Impact Factor
  • S Puig, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: During wine fermentation yeasts quickly reach a stationary phase, where cells are metabolically active by consuming sugars present in grape must. It is, consequently, of great interest at this stage to identify suitable gene promoters that may be used to induce the expression of genes with enological applications. With this aim, we have studied a group of genes showing an induction peak at the diauxic shift, and possessing stress response elements (STRE) at their promoters. We have determined their induction levels under individualized stress conditions, such as carbon source starvation or high salt concentrations. In all the cases studied, the activation and/or basal transcription are dependent on the transcriptional factors Msn2p and Msn4p. We have analysed the expression patterns and mRNA levels during wine fermentation, and have found that they are all activated at the stationary phase. Finally, we have identified SPI1, a new highly expressed yeast gene which is specifically induced at the stationary phase of both microvinification and laboratory growth conditions.
    Yeast 02/2000; 16(2):139-48. · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • S Puig, J E Pérez-Ortín, E Matallana
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    ABSTRACT: The exceptionally close packing of many yeast genes and other chromosomal elements raises the question of how those elements are functionally insulated. All published work shows that natural insulators are very effective, but transcriptional interference (TI) occurs if they are mutated or if their natural context is altered. Mechanisms to avoid TI are poorly understood, but are thought to involve an interplay of cis sequences and trans factors in a chromatin context. We have studied the case of two convergent closely packed ORFs (56 bp of separation) in chromosome IX of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. mRNAs from POT1 and YIL161w overlap by up to 115 nt. Convergent transcription causes a small but noticeable negative effect on the level of POT1 mRNA and nucleosome displacement in the intergenic region. This suggests for the first time that some TI could occur in convergently transcribed yeast genes, even in a natural chromosomal context.
    Current Microbiology 01/2000; 39(6):369-0373. · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • S Puig, E Matallana, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: To gain a better understanding of the function of the yeast histone H1, its role in nucleosome positioning was studied. With this objective in mind, we analyzed a chromatin region of the yeast Chromosome (Chr) IX, in which there are two closely packed open reading frames (ORFs), POT1 and YIL161w. This locus shows a regular ladder of 13 stochastically positioned nucleosomes, which is unaffected by the absence of the HHO1 gene. This suggests that histone H1 has no effect on nucleosome positioning in yeast.
    Current Microbiology 10/1999; 39(3):168-72. · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • C Ivorra, J E Pérez-Ortín, M del Olmo
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    ABSTRACT: During alcoholic fermentations yeast cells are subjected to several stress conditions and, therefore, yeasts have developed molecular mechanisms in order to resist this adverse situation. The mechanisms involved in stress response have been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains. However a better understanding of these mechanisms in wine yeasts could open the possibility to improve the fermentation process. In this work an analysis of the stress response in three wine yeasts has been carried out by studying the expression of several representative genes under several stress conditions which occur during fermentation. We propose a simplified method to study how these stress conditions affect the viability of yeast cells. Using this approach an inverse correlation between stress-resistance and stuck fermentations has been found. We also have preliminary data about the use of the HSP12 gene as a molecular marker for stress-resistance in wine yeasts.
    Biotechnology and Bioengineering 10/1999; 64(6):698-708. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    S Rodríguez-Navarro, F Estruch, J E Pérez-Ortín
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    ABSTRACT: Twelve different ORFs have been deleted from the right arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome II; namely YBR193c, YBR194w, YBR197c, YBR198c, YBR201w, YBR203w, YBR207w, YBR209w, YBR210w, YBR211c, YBR217w and YBR228w. Tetrad analysis of heterozygous deletant strains revealed that YBR193c, YBR198c and YBR211c are essential genes for vegetative growth. No effects were detected in any of the haploid deletion mutants for the rest of the ORFs with respect to growth, gross morphology or mating.
    Yeast 08/1999; 15(10B):913-9. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    A Aranda, J E Pérez-Ortín, C Moore, M del Olmo
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    ABSTRACT: This report provides an analysis of a region of chromosome XII in which the FBP1 and YLR376c genes transcribe in the same direction. Our investigation indicates that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FBP1 gene contains strong signals for polyadenylation and transcription termination in both orientations in vivo . A (TA)14 element plays a major role in directing polyadenylation in both orientations. While this region has four nonoverlapping copies of a TATATA hexanucleotide, which is a very potent polyadenylation efficiency element in yeast, it alone is not sufficient for full activation in the reverse orientation of a cluster of downstream poly(A) sites, and an additional upstream sequence is required. The putative RNA hairpin formed from the (TA)14 element is not involved in 3'-end formation. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire (TA)14 stretch affects transcription termination in the reverse orientation, in contrast to our previous results with the forward orientation, indicating that the transcription termination element operating in the reverse orientation has very different sequence requirements. Promoter elements for the YLR376c gene overlap with the signal for FBP1 3'-end formation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that overlapping of both types of regulatory signals has been found in two adjacent yeast genes.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/1998; 26(20):4588-96. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have analyzed the histone acetyltransferase enzymes obtained from a series of yeast hat1, hat2, and gcn5 single mutants and hat1,hat2 and hat1,gcn5 double mutants. Extracts prepared from both hat1 and hat2 mutant strains specifically lack the following two histone acetyltransferase activities: the well known cytoplasmic type B enzyme and a free histone H4-specific histone acetyltransferase located in the nucleus. The catalytic subunits of both cytoplasmic and nuclear enzymes have identical molecular masses (42 kDa), the same as that of HAT1. However, the cytoplasmic complex has a molecular mass (150 kDa) greater than that of the nuclear complex (110 kDa). The possible functions of HAT1 and HAT2 in the yeast nucleus are discussed. In addition, we have detected a yeast histone acetyltransferase not previously described, designated HAT-A4. This enzyme is located in the nucleus and is able to acetylate free and nucleosome-bound histones H3 and H4. Finally, we show that the hat1, gcn5 double mutant is viable and does not exhibit a new phenotype, thus suggesting the existence of several histone acetyltransferases with overlapping functions.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/1998; 273(20):12599-605. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    A Aranda, J E Pérez-Ortín, C Moore, M L del Olmo
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    ABSTRACT: Efficient transcription termination downstream of poly(A) sites has been shown to correlate with the strength of an upstream polyadenylation signal and the presence of a polymerase pause site. To further investigate the mechanism linking termination with 3'-end processing, we analyzed the cis-acting elements that contribute to these events in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FBP1 gene. FBP1 has a complex polyadenylation signal, and at least three efficiency elements must be present for efficient processing. However, not all combinations of these elements are equally effective. This gene also shows a novel organization of sequence elements. A strong positioning element is located upstream, rather than downstream, of the efficiency elements, and functions to select the cleavage site in vitro and in vivo. Transcription run-on analysis indicated that termination occurs within 61 nt past the poly(A) site. Deletion of two UAUAUA-type efficiency elements greatly reduces polyadenylation in vivo and in vitro, but transcription termination is still efficient, implying that FBP1 termination signals may be distinct from those for polyadenylation. Alternatively, assembly of a partial, but nonfunctional, polyadenylation complex on the nascent transcript may be sufficient to cause termination.
    RNA 03/1998; 4(3):303-18. · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin.
    Nature 05/1997; 387:75-78. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin.
    Nature 05/1997; 387:75-78. · 38.60 Impact Factor
  • A Aranda, J E Pérez-Ortín, C J Benham, M L Del Olmo
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    ABSTRACT: We address here the question of the in vivo structure of a natural alternating d(TA)n sequence found at the 3' region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FBP1 gene. This sequence consists of 13 TA pairs interrupted by a TT dinucleotide in the middle of the tract. Previous experiments with cruciform-specific nucleases S1 and Endonuclease VII demonstrated the presence in vitro of a cruciform in this region. We also showed this region to be part of a nuclease hypersensitive site flanked by nucleosomes in yeast chromatin. Here we demonstrate, by means of S1 in vivo footprinting, that in yeast plasmids also adopts in vivo a non B-DNA structure where is not a cruciform. A theoretical analysis of this region that it contains a site susceptible to superhelical stress duplex destabilization. The locations and conditions under which alternative structures form in the wild-type sequence and in deletion mutants agree with these theoretical predictions, suggesting that some kind of denaturation is the alternative structure adopted by the sequence in vivo. This suggests that negative superhelical stress sufficient for local denaturation exists in nucleosomal DNA. We also demonstrate by micrococcal nuclease digestions that the deletion of the alternating d(TA)n sequence modifies the chromatin hypersensitive site but does not affect nucleosome positioning.
    Yeast 04/1997; 13(4):313-26. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA sequence of a 4.1 kb region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV was determined. This region contains a single open reading frame which codes for a member of the hexose transporter family. This new gene has been named HXT15 according to yeast gene data bases.
    Yeast 10/1996; 12(10B Suppl):1005-11. · 1.96 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

901 Citations
194.86 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007
    • Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro
      Vila Real, Vila Real, Portugal
    • University of Minho
      • Life and Health Sciences Research Institute
      Bracara Augusta, Braga, Portugal
  • 2000
    • Spanish National Research Council
      • Department of Biotechnology & Aquaculture
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Université Libre de Bruxelles
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 1985–2000
    • University of Valencia
      • • Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular
      • • Departamento de Genética
      Valencia, Valencia, Spain
  • 1996
    • Instituto Universitario de Tecnología de Valencia
      Valencia, Estado Carabobo, Venezuela