Franco Borgogno

Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Piedmont, Italy

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Publications (9)0.86 Total impact

  • Chapter: Tabù
    Franco Borgogno, Gabriele Cassullo
    07/2013; , ISBN: 9788811740933
  • Gabriele Cassullo, Franco Borgogno
    Edited by Borla, 11/2011; Borla., ISBN: 8826318360
  • Franco Borgogno, Gabriele Cassullo
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    ABSTRACT: http://www.ipa.org.uk/en/What_is_Psychoanalysis/University/en/Psychoanalytic_Theory/Psychoanalysis_at_University/Psychoanalysis_at_University.aspx?hkey=2f50ae51-80a3-4834-8f4a-b2a375ae55f1
    International Forum of Psychoanalysis 11/2010; 19(3):194-200.
  • Franco Borgogno, Gabriele Cassullo
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    ABSTRACT: This article arises from the need to "present" (that is, to read again in a "present and actual" light) the paper, "Why Analysts Need Their Patients' Transferences" by Charles Rycroft (which first appeared in 1993 and is re-published in this Special Issue), and is therefore strictly connected to the ideas the latter contains. The authors, on the one hand, outline the stages of the journey that took Rycroft to elaborate the concept of "ablation of the parental images", and on the other, retrace his personal "analytic genealogy" and discover a "missing forefather", Sándor Ferenczi, who has represented for a long time a direct "missing link" in the history of psychoanalysis.
    The American Journal of Psychoanalysis 06/2010; 70(2):128-38.
  • Source
    Franco Borgogno, Massimo Vigna-Taglianti
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    ABSTRACT: Within a clinical-theoretical framework focused on transference-countertransference dynamics, the authors reflect on role-reversal and on the reasons it has been neglected for a long time in literature. This primitive inter- and intra-psychic process, often at the forefront in our practice, will be discussed in its principal aspects (patient's unconscious identification with parents' psychic culture and concomitant dissociation of the infant part of the self), signaling how the enactment can be an inevitable element which, putting into play the past dissociated object relationships, becomes a source of mutative understanding.
    The American Journal of Psychoanalysis 01/2009; 68(4):313-24.
  • Franco Borgogno
    The International Journal of Psychoanalysis 05/2008; 89(2):445-8. · 0.86 Impact Factor
  • Franco Borgogno
    The American Journal of Psychoanalysis. 01/2008; 68(1):69-94.
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to present the close link between Ferenczi's and Winnicott's theoretical, clinical and therapeutic thought, indicating how this link has become something of a "missing link" in the history of psychoanalytic ideas, an implication which we retain, in part, to this day. In the first part entitled "Who's speaking to whom?", I aim to explore the contents of the most essential parts of their messages, stressing the similarities and differences between them, and citing the most important authors whom they address (Freud for Ferenczi, Klein for Winnicott). In the second part, I aim to tackle the general direction underlying both their work and their lives, concentrating specifically on "the maternal", and examining the repercussions of this aspect on psychoanalytic technique and practice. In the third part, as a kind of "Parting", I will present further brief conclusions on the relevance and significance of their thoughts in modern day psychoanalysis, defining Ferenczi and Winnicott as "founders of future discursiveness".
    The American Journal of Psychoanalysis 10/2007; 67(3):221-34.
  • Franco Borgogno
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, I am going to limit myself to tracing a map of the principal points in Ferenczi's thinking concerning trauma. Ferenczi's contribution to trauma theory is fundamental, even though up to today--in spite of the recent "Ferenczian Renaissance"--it still remains for many psychoanalysts simply not acknowledged and not considered and, when it is acknowledged and considered, it is frequently misunderstood or reported only in part. Perhaps this is because passages of his theory are extrapolated without knowing his entire clinical theoretical way or because he is quoted through others without the authors having personally read his work. These last ones are typical habits, as we know, to project one's own ideas, especially our prejudices.
    The American Journal of Psychoanalysis 07/2007; 67(2):141-9.