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Publications (4)13.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Heart failure (HF) management is complicated by difficulties in clinical assessment. Biomarkers may help guide HF management, but the correspondence between clinical evaluation and biomarker serum levels has hardly been studied. We investigated the correlation between biomarkers and clinical signs and symptoms, the influence of patient characteristics and comorbidities on New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification and the effect of using biomarkers on clinical evaluation. This post-hoc analysis comprised 622 patients (77 ± 8 years, 76 % NYHA class ≥3, 80 % LVEF ≤45 %) participating in TIME-CHF, randomising patients to either NT-proBNP-guided or symptom-guided therapy. Biomarker measurements and clinical evaluation were performed at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. NT-proBNP, GDF-15, hs-TnT and to a lesser extent hs-CRP and cystatin-C were weakly correlated to NYHA, oedema, jugular vein distension and orthopnoea (ρ-range: 0.12-0.33; p < 0.01). NT-proBNP correlated more strongly to NYHA class in the NT-proBNP-guided group compared with the symptom-guided group. NYHA class was significantly influenced by age, body mass index, anaemia, and the presence of two or more comorbidities. In HF, biomarkers correlate only weakly with clinical signs and symptoms. NYHA classification is influenced by several comorbidities and patient characteristics. Clinical judgement seems to be influenced by a clinician's awareness of NT-proBNP concentrations.
    Netherlands heart journal: monthly journal of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Heart Foundation 12/2013; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and AIMS: Inflammation is part of the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure (CHF). However, little is known about the impact of the presence of systemic inflammatory disease (SID), defined as inflammatory syndrome with constitutional symptoms and involvement of at least two organs as co-morbidity on the clinical course and prognosis of patients with CHF.Methods and RESULTS: This is an analysis of all 622 patients included in TIME-CHF. After an 18 months follow-up, outcomes of patients with and without SID were compared. Primary endpoint was all-cause hospitalization free survival. Secondary endpoints were overall survival and CHF hospitalization free survival. At baseline, 38 patients had history of SID (6.1%). These patients had higher NT-proBNP and worse renal function than patients without SID. SID was a risk factor for adverse outcome (primary endpoint: hazard ratio (HR)=1.73 [95%-CI: 1.18-2.55, p=0.005]; survival: HR=2.60 [1.49-4.55, p=0.001]; CHF hospitalization free survival: HR=2.3 [1.45-3.65, p<0.001]). In multivariate models, SID remained the strongest independent risk factor for survival and for CHF hospitalization free survival. In elderly patients with CHF, SID is independently accompanied with adverse outcome. Given the increasing prevalence of SID in the elderly population, these findings are clinically important for both risk stratification and patient management.
    QJM: monthly journal of the Association of Physicians 10/2013; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and LV hypertrophy independent of myocardial ischaemia and hypertension, could contribute to the increased life-time risk of congestive heart failure seen in patients with diabetes. We assessed prospectively the prevalence, effectiveness of screening methods [brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein in combination with clinical parameters], and outcome of pre-clinical diabetic cardiomyopathy. We studied 100 adults (mean age 57.4 +/- 10.2 years, 44% females) with diabetes and no previous evidence of structural heart disease. By echocardiography, diabetic cardiomyopathy was present in 48% of patients. Screening with combinations of clinical parameters (gender, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index), but not BNP, resulted in high negative predictive values for diabetic cardiomyopathy. During a mean follow-up of 48.5 +/- 9.0 months, in the groups with and without diabetic cardiomyopathy, 12.5 vs. 3.9% (P < 0.2) patients died or experienced cardiovascular events and 37.5 vs. 9.6% (P < 0.002) had a deterioration in NYHA functional class. Overall event-free survival was 54 vs. 87% (P = 0.001) in the groups with and without diabetic cardiomyopathy, respectively. Brain natriuretic peptide was an independent predictor of events [odds ratio 3.5 (1.1-10.9), P = 0.02]. Pre-clinical diabetic cardiomyopathy is common. Screening with combinations of simple clinical parameters, but not BNP, can be useful to identify those patients needing further evaluation. Patients with pre-clinical diabetic cardiomyopathy are at increased risk for functional deterioration and possibly cardiovascular events during follow-up. Brain natriuretic peptide was shown to be an independent predictor of future events.
    European Journal of Heart Failure 09/2010; 12(9):951-7. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Contemporary heart failure (HF) patients are elderly and have a high rate of early rehospitalization or death, resulting in a high burden for both the patients and the health care system. Prior studies were focused on younger and less well-characterized patients. We aimed to identify predictors of early hospital readmission and death in elderly patients with HF. Patients with chronic HF taking part in the TIME-CHF study (n = 614, age 77 +/- 8 years, 41% female, left ventricular ejection fraction 35% +/- 13%) were evaluated with respect to predictors of hospital readmission or death 30 and 90 days after inclusion. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic, and social variables were obtained at baseline and included in a multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of early events. The rate of hospital readmission or death was high at 30 (11%) and 90 days (26%). The reason for hospitalization was HF in 33%, other cardiovascular in 32%, and noncardiovascular in 45% of the cases, respectively. Predictors of readmission or death at 30 days were angina, lower systolic blood pressure, anemia, more extensive edema, higher creatinine levels, and dry cough; and at 90 days were coronary artery disease, prior pacemaker implantation, high jugular venous pressure, pulmonary rales, prior abdominal surgery, older age, and depressive symptoms. Early hospital readmission or death was frequent among elderly HF patients. A very large proportion of readmissions were due to noncardiovascular causes. In addition to clinical signs of HF, comorbidities are important predictors of early events in elderly HF patients.
    American heart journal 08/2010; 160(2):308-14. · 4.65 Impact Factor