Gyöngyi N Kiss

University of Pécs, Fuenfkirchen, Baranya county, Hungary

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Publications (2)9.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Due to its antiapoptotic action, derivatives of the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) provide potential therapeutic utility in diseases associated with programmed cell death. Apoptosis is one of the major pathophysiological processes elicited by radiation injury to the organism. Consequently, therapeutic explorations applying compounds that mimic the antiapoptotic action of LPA have begun. Here we present a brief account of our decade-long drug discovery effort aimed at developing LPA mimics with a special focus on specific agonists of the LPA(2) receptor subtype, which was found to be highly effective in protecting cells from apoptosis. We describe new evidence that 2-((3-(1,3-dioxo-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl)propyl)thio)benzoic acid (GRI977143), a prototypic nonlipid agonist specific to the LPA(2) receptor subtype, rescues apoptotically condemned cells in vitro and in vivo from injury caused by high-dose γ-irradiation. GRI977143 shows the features of a radiomitigator because it is effective in rescuing the lives of mice from deadly levels of radiation when administered 24h after radiation exposure. Our findings suggest that by specifically activating LPA(2) receptors GRI977143 activates the ERK1/2 prosurvival pathway, effectively reduces Bax translocation to the mitochondrion, attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases, reduces DNA fragmentation, and inhibits PARP-1 cleavage associated with γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis. GRI977143 also inhibits bystander apoptosis elicited by soluble proapoptotic mediators produced by irradiated cells. Thus, GRI977143 can serve as a prototype scaffold for lead optimization paving the way to more potent analogs amenable for therapeutic exploration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 01/2013; 1831(1):117-25. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FTY720 (Fingolimod), a synthetic analogue of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), activates four of the five EDG-family S1P receptors and is in a phase-III clinical study for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. (S)-FTY720-phosphate (FTY720-P) causes S1P(1) receptor internalization and targeting to the proteasomal degradative pathway, and thus functions as an antagonist of S1P(1) by depleting the functional S1P(1) receptor from the plasma membrane. Here we describe the pharmacological characterization of two unsaturated phosphonate enantiomers of FTY720, (R)- and (S)-FTY720-vinylphosphonate. (R)-FTY720-vinylphosphonate was a full agonist of S1P(1) (EC(50) 20+/-3 nM). In contrast, the (S) enantiomer failed to activate any of the five S1P GPCRs and was a full antagonist of S1P(1,3,4) (K(i) 384 nM, 39 nM, and 1190 nM, respectively) and a partial antagonist of S1P(2), and S1P(5). Both enantiomers dose-dependently inhibited lysophospholipase D (recombinant autotaxin) with K(i) values in the low micromolar range, although with different enzyme kinetic mechanisms. When injected into mice, both enantiomers caused transient peripheral lymphopenia. (R)- and (S)-FTY720-vinylphosphonates activated ERK1/2, AKT, and exerted an antiapoptotic effect in camptothecin-treated IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells, which primarily express S1P(2) transcripts and traces of S1P(5). (S)-FTY720-vinylphosphonate is the first pan-antagonist of S1P receptors and offers utility in probing S1P responses in vitro and in vivo. The biological effects of the (R)- and (S)-FTY720-vinylphosphonate analogues underscore the complexity of FTY720 cellular targets.
    Cellular Signalling 10/2010; 22(10):1543-53. · 4.47 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

25 Citations
9.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Pécs
      Fuenfkirchen, Baranya county, Hungary
    • The University of Tennessee Health Science Center
      • Department of Physiology
      Memphis, Tennessee, United States