Jeannie Aguilar

University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States

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Publications (7)8.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This review examines ethnicity reporting in three autism-related journals (Autism, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, and Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders) over a 6-year period. A comprehensive multistep search of articles is used to identify ethnicity as a demographic variable in these three journals. Articles that identified research participants' ethnicity were further analyzed to determine the impact of ethnicity as a demographic variable on findings of each study. The results indicate that ethnicity has not been adequately reported in these three autism related journals even though previous recommendations have been made to improve inadequacies of descriptive information of research participants in autism research (Kistner and Robbins in J Autism Dev Disord 16:77-82, 1986). Implications for the field of autism spectrum disorders are discussed in addition to further recommendations for future research.
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 02/2014; · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the influence of motivating operations on the generalization of newly taught mands across settings and communication partners for 3 children with autism. Two conditions were implemented prior to generalization probes. In the first condition, participants were given access to a preferred item until they rejected the item (i.e., abolishing operation). In the second condition, the item was not available to participants prior to generalization probes (i.e., establishing operation). The effects of these conditions on the generalization of newly taught mands were evaluated in a multielement design. Results indicated differentiated responding during generalization probes in which more manding with the target mand was observed following the presession no-access condition than in the presession access condition. These results support the consideration of motivating operations when assessing generalization of target mands to various untrained contexts.
    Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 01/2012; 45(3):565-77. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the maintenance of newly acquired mands under presession reinforcer access (reinforcer efficacy abolished) and no presession reinforcer access (reinforcer efficacy established) conditions with 3 children with autism spectrum disorder. Results suggested that the no presession access condition established the value of the reinforcer and evoked responding relative to the presession access condition. Results are discussed in the context of implications for assessing maintenance of previously acquired skills.
    Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 01/2012; 45(2):443-7. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by attention, tangible items, or escape. Results demonstrated different effects related to the occurrence of problem behavior, suggesting an interaction between function of problem behavior and assessment format. Implications for practitioners are discussed with respect to assessing preferences of individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit problem behavior.
    Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 01/2011; 44(4):835-46. · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Joint attention is the act of sharing an experience of an object or event with another person. Individuals with autism often have deficits in this area. This review synthesizes 27 articles, involving interventions for individuals with autism, that measured joint attention as an outcome variable. Studies were analyzed and summarized in terms of: (a) joint attention as a collateral versus direct outcome, (b) participant characteristics, (c) study design, (d) intervention techniques, (e) types of joint attention measured, and (f) results. Interventions either directly targeted joint attention or measured joint attention as a collateral outcome. Most interventions used a combination of behavioral and developmental strategies. The results of these studies suggest that using play as a context, and training with natural communication partners may benefit generalization. Future research should address the relation between type of intervention and child characteristics, ensure that joint attention behaviors meet natural contingencies that serve the purpose of sharing attention, and continue to examine collateral outcomes of joint attention.
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders - RES AUTISM SPECTR DISORD. 01/2011; 5(4):1283-1295.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to reduce stereotypy and challenging behavior during play skills instruction by adding an abolishing operation component (AOC) to the intervention strategy. An alternating treatments design compared one condition in which participants were allowed to engage in stereotypy freely before beginning the play skills intervention (AOC condition) to a second condition without this free access period (No AOC condition). Across 4 participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), levels of stereotypy and challenging behavior were lower and functional play was higher during play intervention sessions that followed the AOC. These data provided support for the inclusion of an AOC in interventions aimed at increasing the play skills of children with ASD who present with stereotypy.
    Behavior modification 07/2010; 34(4):267-89. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the influence of language of implementation on functional analysis outcomes for a child with a severe intellectual disability from a Spanish-speaking home. Challenging behavior was assessed during 5-min sessions under 4 conditions; attention, play-verbal, play-nonverbal, and demand and across 2 phases; implementation in English versus Spanish. The highest levels of challenging behavior occurred during the attention and demand conditions of the English phases. These results suggest that the language of implementation may influence the overall levels of challenging behavior within functional analysis conditions. KeywordsFunctional analysis–Language–Challenging behavior–Diversity
    Journal of Behavioral Education 20(4):224-232.