Natalie J Morris

Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States

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Publications (4)19.48 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Because bipolar disorder can be difficult to diagnose, we compared characteristics of women with confirmed versus presumably misdiagnosed bipolar disorder. This cohort study was conducted from July 2005 to January 2010 in the outpatient clinic of the Emory Women's Mental Health Program, Atlanta, Georgia. Young adult women (mean age = 32 years) who were either pregnant or planning to conceive and who reported having previous clinical diagnoses of bipolar disorder completed 2 independent diagnostic assessments: the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID) and an evaluation by a perinatal mood-disorder expert who was masked to the SCID findings. We compared clinical characteristics of women with confirmed versus presumably misdiagnosed bipolar disorder by bivariate testing followed by multivariate logistic regression modeling. Of 199 participants, 141 (70.9%) had confirmed DSM-IV bipolar disorder on the basis of concordant assessments, 23 (11.6%) were considered misdiagnosed, and 35 (17.6%) who had discordant diagnostic assessments were excluded from further analysis. Multivariate modeling indicated that confirmed bipolar disorder was associated with a history of antidepressant-associated mania/hypomania (OR = 13.30; 95% CI, 3.32-53.20; P = .0003), psychotic symptoms (OR = 12.40; 95% CI, 2.14-71.10; P = .005), and sustained euthymia during mood-stabilizer treatment (OR = 4.53; 95% CI, 1.32-15.60; P = .02); presumably misdiagnosed bipolar disorder was associated with childhood physical abuse (OR = 8.73; 95% CI, 2.33-32.70; P = .001) and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OR = 7.26; 95% CI, 1.86-28.30; P = .004). Several clinical factors found to distinguish women with confirmed versus presumably misdiagnosed bipolar disorder may help to refine clinical diagnosis.
    The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 02/2012; 73(2):242-6. · 5.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the association between severity of maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy and the maternal use of medicinal agents and habit-forming substances. Participants in a prospective study of prenatal DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders at the Emory Women's Mental Health Program who completed weekly documentation of prenatal drug exposure and ≥ 3 administrations of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) or Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) were included. The primary outcome measures were the HDRS and HARS. Correlation coefficients were computed for cumulative drug exposure with HDRS area under the curve (AUC) and HARS AUC. Data collection was completed between January 2007 and June 2010. Among 195 participants, both HDRS AUC and HARS AUC were negatively correlated with prenatal vitamin exposure (r = -0.22 [P = .002] and r = -0.26 [P = .0003], respectively) and positively correlated with tobacco (r = 0.21 [P = .003] and r = 0.20 [P = .006], respectively) and hypnotic (r = 0.28 [P < .0001] and r = 0.19 [P = .008], respectively) exposure. Only HDRS AUC correlated with exposure to antiemetics (r = 0.14 [P = .05]), opioid analgesics (r = 0.14 [P = .05]), and all prescription drugs (r = 0.16 [P = .02]). Only HARS AUC correlated with benzodiazepine exposure (r = 0.17 [P = .02]). Both prenatal depression and anxiety are associated with decreased prenatal vitamin compliance and increased use of hypnotics and tobacco, but only depression is associated with exposure to a broader array of medications targeting physical symptoms that often accompany depression. These findings confirm and extend previous studies, underscoring the importance of addressing prenatal depression and anxiety.
    The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 11/2011; 73(2):247-51. · 5.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the current study was to delineate the optimal cutpoints for depression rating scales during pregnancy and the postpartum period and to assess the perinatal factors influencing these scores. Women participating in prospective investigations of maternal mental illness were enrolled prior to 28 weeks gestation and followed through 6 months postpartum. At each visit, subjects completed self-rated depression scales--Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and clinician-rated scales--Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD(17) and HRSD(21)). These scores were compared to the SCID Mood Module for the presence of fulfilling diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode (MDE) during 6 perinatal windows: preconception; first trimester; 2nd trimester; 3rd trimester; early postpartum; and later postpartum. Optimal cutpoints were determined by maximizing the sum of each scale's sensitivity and specificity. Stratified ROC analyses determined the impact of previous pregnancy and comparison of initial to follow-up visits. A total of 534 women encompassing 640 pregnancies and 4025 follow-up visits were included. ROC analysis demonstrated that all 4 scales were highly predictive of MDE. The AUCs ranged from 0.857 to 0.971 and were all highly significant (p < .0001). Optimal cutpoints were higher at initial visits and for multigravidas and demonstrated more variability for the self-rated scales. These data indicate that both clinician-rated and self-rated scales can be effective tools in identifying perinatal episodes of major depression. However, the results also suggest that prior childbirth experiences and the use of scales longitudinally across the perinatal period influence optimal cutpoints.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 02/2011; 45(2):213-9. · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Outcome investigations of prenatal maternal depression and psychotropic exposure rely extensively on maternal retrospective recall. This study compared postnatal recall to prospective documentation of illness and medication exposures. Prospective cohort and retrospective case-control studies. Emory Women's Mental Health Program (prospective study) and Emory University Department of Psychology (retrospective study). A total of 164 women who participated in both the prospective and retrospective studies. Women with a history of mental illness were followed during pregnancy for prospective prenatal assessments of depression and medication exposures. At 6 months postpartum, some of these women also participated in a retrospective study during which they were asked to recall prenatal depression and medication use. Agreement between prospective and retrospective documentation of exposures was analysed. Occurrence of maternal depression during pregnancy and maternal use of pharmacological agents during pregnancy. There was only moderate agreement (k = 0.42) in prospective versus retrospective reporting of prenatal depression. Positive predictive value for recalling depression was 90.4%; however, negative predictive value for denying depression was only 53.8%. Participants accurately recalled psychotropic use but significantly underreported use of nonpsychotropic medications. Studies using retrospective data collection may be susceptible to systematic recall bias with underreporting of maternal depression and use of nonpsychotropic agents during pregnancy.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 06/2008; 115(6):681-8. · 3.76 Impact Factor