Sung Mi Hwang

Hallym University Medical Center, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (32)25.07 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate our institutional experience with veno-venous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF). From January 2007 to August 2013, 31 patients with severe ARF that was due to various causes and refractory to mechanical ventilation with conventional therapy were supported with VV ECMO. A partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO₂)/inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO₂) <100 mm Hg at an FiO₂ of 1.0 or a pH <7.25 due to CO₂ retention were set as criteria for VV ECMO. Overall, 68% of patients survived among those who had received VV ECMO with a mean PaO₂/FiO₂ of 56.8 mm Hg. Furthermore, in trauma patients, early use of ECMO had the best outcome with a 94% survival rate. VV ECMO is an excellent, life-saving treatment option in patients suffering from acute and life-threatening respiratory failure due to various causes, especially trauma, and early use of VV ECMO therapy improved outcomes in these patients.
    Yonsei medical journal. 01/2015; 56(1):212-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Tracheobronchial injury is uncommon in children, but may result in life-threatening conditions. We present a case of transection of the right intermediate bronchus, right middle lobe bronchus and right lower lobe bronchus in a 28-month-old child with blunt chest injury. The gold standard for diagnosis is tracheobronchoscopy, however, the bronchoscopy may not always be available for little children. For diagnosis in similar cases, a high index of suspicion should be needed based on symptoms, chest X-ray and computed tomography findings. In addition, anesthesiologists should be aware of this dangerous condition and must be fully prepared for rapid and appropriate management during operation.
    Saudi journal of anaesthesia. 07/2014; 8(3):421-3.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare the results of ultrasonographically guided axillary nerve block (ANB) combined with suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with those of SSNB alone on postoperative pain and satisfaction within the first 48 hours after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.
    Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery. 05/2014; 30(8).
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    ABSTRACT: T-type calcium channels (T-channels) play an important role in controlling excitability of nociceptors. We have previously shown that a synthetic series of 5β-reduced steroids induce a voltage-dependent blockade of T-currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells in vitro and induce potent analgesia to thermal stimuli in rats in vivo (Mol Pharmacol 66:1223-1235, 2004). Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous 5β-reduced neuroactive steroid molecule, epipregnanolone [(3β,5β)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one], on peripheral nociception. We used acutely dissociated DRG cells in vitro from adult rats as well as in vivo pain studies in mice and rats to investigate the effects of epipregnanolone on DRG T-channels. We found that epipregnanolone reversibly blocked DRG T-currents with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2 μM and stabilized the channel in the inactive state. However, sodium, potassium, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated ionic currents were not sensitive to the blocking effects of epipregnanolone even at 10 μM. In ensuing in vivo studies, we found that intraplantar (i.pl.) injections of epipregnanolone directly into peripheral receptive fields reduced responses to nociceptive heat stimuli in rats in a dose-dependent fashion. Furthermore, i.pl. epipregnanolone injections effectively reduced responses to peripheral nociceptive thermal and mechanical stimuli in wild-type mice but had no effect on the responses of CaV3.2 knockout mice. We conclude that the inhibition of peripheral CaV3.2 T-channels contributes to the potent analgesic effect of the endogenous steroid epipregnanolone.
    Psychopharmacology 05/2014; · 4.06 Impact Factor
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    Sung Mi Hwang
    Korean journal of anesthesiology. 05/2014; 66(5):337-8.
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective study aimed to evaluate the satisfaction of patients who participated in the decision-making process for selecting an anesthesia method for surgery; the patients' preferred role (active, collaborative or passive) in the decision-making; and the patients' preferred choice of anesthetic method. The study included 257 patients scheduled for simple elective surgeries involving the upper or lower extremities. During the preanesthetic visit, patients were informed regarding two methods of anesthesia for their surgeries, and participated in selecting one option. Of the 257 patients, 69.6% preferred a collaborative role, 18.3% and 12.1% preferred an active and a passive role, respectively. Among patients requiring surgery on an upper extremity and on a lower extremity, 64.3% and 51.3% expressed a preference for general anesthesia over regional anesthesia, respectively. After surgery, the majority of our patients were satisfied (93.4%) and felt respected (97.7%). Furthermore, the patients expressed a change in preference for assuming an active role (49.4%) and a collaborative role (43.6%) in the decision-making process for their future anesthesia needs. This study may help to promote patient centered care in a department of anesthesiology.
    Journal of Korean medical science 02/2014; 29(2):287-91. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(4):e91467. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation of suprascpaular nerve (SSN) in patients with chronic shoulder pain due to adhesive capsulitis and/or rotator cuff tear. The study included 11 patients suffering from chronic shoulder pain for at least 6 months who were diagnosed with adhesive capsulitis (n=4), rotator cuff tear (n=5), or adhesive capsulitis+rotator cuff tear (n=2) using shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or extremity ultrasonography. After a favorable response to a diagnostic suprascapular nerve block twice a week (pain improvement >50%), PRF neuromodulation was performed. Shoulder pain and quality of life were assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) before the diagnostic block and every month after PRF neuromodulation over a 9-month period. The mean VAS score of 11 patients before PRF was 6.4±1.49, and the scores at 6-month and 9 month follow-up were 1.0±0.73 and 1.5±1.23, respectively. A significant pain reduction (p<0.001) was observed. The mean OSS score of 11 patients before PRF was 22.7±8.1, and the scores at 6-month and 9 month follow-up were 41.5±6.65 and 41.0±6.67, respectively. A significant OSS improvement (p<0.001) was observed. PRF neuromodulation of the suprascapular nerve is an effective treatment for chronic shoulder pain, and the effect was sustained over a relatively long period in patients with medically intractable shoulder pain.
    Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society 12/2013; 54(6):507-10. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    Jae Jun Lee, Gi Ho Gim, Ji Su Jang, Sung Mi Hwang
    Korean journal of anesthesiology 12/2013; 65(6 Suppl):S47-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) leading to cardiopulmonary dysfunction is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with central nervous system lesions. This case report describes a 28-yr woman with life-threatening fulminant NPE, which was refractory to conventional respiratory treatment, following the rupture of an aneurysm. She was treated successfully with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), although ECMO therapy is generally contraindicated in neurological injuries such as brain trauma and diseases that are likely to require surgical intervention. The success of this treatment suggests that ECMO therapy should not be withheld from patients with life-threatening fulminant NPE after subarachnoid hemorrhage.
    Journal of Korean medical science 06/2013; 28(6):962-4. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An airway-exchange catheter (AEC) can increase the safety of exchanges of endotracheal tubes (ETTs); however, the procedure is associated with potential risks. We describe a case of esophageal misplacement of a single-lumen ETT after switching from a double-lumen tube, despite the use of an AEC as a guidewire. To avoid this, physicians should consider the insertion depth and maintenance depth of the AEC and should verify its position before changing ETTs and should perform, if possible, with simultaneous visualization of the glottis with direct or video laryngoscopy during the exchange. Additionally, the new ETT position should be confirmed by auscultation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, and portable chest X-ray.
    Saudi journal of anaesthesia. 04/2013; 7(2):194-6.
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopy-guided direct suprascapular nerve block performed after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. METHODS: In the present prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical study, 30 patients were divided into two groups: 15 patients (group I) were treated with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block using 10 mL 0.5 % ropivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine, and 15 patients (group II) were treated with placebo using 10 mL 0.9 % saline after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patient pain levels were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h post-operatively. Additionally, the number of boluses and total amount of fentanyl dispensed by patient-controlled analgesia administration during the 24-h post-operative period were evaluated. RESULTS: VAS scores did not differ significantly between groups I and II during the 24-h post-operative period, but mean fentanyl bolus consumption was significantly less in group I compared with group II (p = 0.015). CONCLUSION: Arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block at the end of a rotator cuff repair was safe and less time-consuming than expected. Although this procedure did not significantly reduce the post-operative pain, the post-operative need for fentanyl boluses as analgesia was reduced significantly, and it would be beneficial if this procedure involved a sensory branch of axillary nerve block or was performed at the beginning of the arthroscopic procedure. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial, Level I.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 03/2013; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Dexmedetomidine, a selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist, has analgesic and sedative effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of small, single-dose intravenous dexmedetomidine administration after hyperbaric bupivacaine spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Sixty adult patients classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 or 2 and scheduled for lower extremity surgery under spinal anesthesia were studied. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups and administered hyperbaric intrathecal bupivacaine 12 mg. 5 min after spinal anesthesia, patients in groups 1, 2, and 3 received normal saline 10 ml, dexmedetomidine 0.25 μg/kg, and dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg, respectively, over 10-min intravenous administration. The onset time, maximum block level, two-dermatome sensory regression time, duration of motor and sensory anesthesia, and side effects were assessed. RESULTS: The two-dermatome sensory regression time was significantly increased in groups 2 and 3. The duration of motor and sensory anesthesia was significantly increased in group 3. Onset time, maximum block level, level of sedation, and incidence of hypotension and treatment-needed bradycardia were no different among the groups. CONCLUSION: Single-dose intravenous dexmedetomidine 0.25-0.5 μg/kg, administered 5 min after intrathecal injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine, improved the duration of spinal anesthesia without significant side effects. This method may be useful for increasing the duration of spinal anesthesia, even after intrathecal injection of local anesthetics.
    Journal of Anesthesia 01/2013; · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective study evaluated the effects of continuous sedation using midazolam, with or without remifentanil, on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients undergoing myringoplasty. Sixty patients undergoing myringoplasty were sedated with midazolam in the presence of remifentanil (group MR), or after saline injection instead of remifentanil (group M). Three patients (10%) in group M complained of nausea; two vomited. Four patients (13%) in group MR complained of nausea and vomited within 24 h after surgery. Rescue drugs were given to the six patients who vomited. No significant difference was detected between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of nausea, incidence of vomiting, or need for rescue drugs. Midazolam-based continuous sedation can reduce PONV after myringoplasty. Compared with midazolam alone, midazolam with remifentanil produced no difference in the incidence or severity of nausea, incidence of vomiting, or need for rescue drugs.
    Yonsei medical journal 09/2012; 53(5):1010-3. · 0.77 Impact Factor
  • Article: In reply.
    Anesthesiology 09/2012; 117(3):676. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a difficult case of tracheostomy in a 34-year-old obese woman with a short neck. The tracheostomy tube placement repeatedly failed because of anatomical changes due to obesity and a short neck, tracheal mucosal swelling due to prolonged intubation, and unexpected false passage; however, it was successfully performed using an endotracheal tube exchanger as a guidewire.
    Korean journal of anesthesiology 06/2011; 60(6):434-6.
  • Anesthesiology 05/2011; 115(4):858. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This report presents the case of a 63-year-old man who had a myocardial infarction leading to coronary artery bypass graft 2 years earlier who subsequently underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. After an uneventful operation, the patient developed an acute postoperative myocardial infarction in the recovery room and died 19 days postoperatively. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the rare possibility of acute, fatal postoperative myocardial infarction and consider this complication when they perform the preoperative risk evaluation, anesthesia, and postoperative care for cardiac patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.
    Korean journal of anesthesiology 12/2010; 59 Suppl:S110-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Histologically, Schmorl's nodes are defined as the loss of nuclear material through the cartilage plate, growth plate, and end plate into the vertebral body. Most Schmorl's nodes are asymptomatic, although there are some reports of symptomatic Schmorl's nodes, which should be treated similarly to vertebral compression fractures, with conservative treatment as the first choice. We report the case that we reduced the pain by blocking the ramus communicans nerve in a patient with Schmorl's node.
    The Korean journal of pain 12/2010; 23(4):262-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Spinal myoclonus is an unusual, self-limiting, adverse event that may occur during spinal anesthesia. The exact cause and underlying biochemical mechanism of spinal myoclonus remain unclear. A few cases of spinal myoclonus have been reported after administration of intrathecal bupivacaine. We report a case in which spinal myoclonus recurred after two episodes of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine at a 1-year interval in a 35-year-old woman. The myoclonus was acute and transient. The patient recovered completely, with no neurologic sequelae.
    Korean journal of anesthesiology 12/2010; 59 Suppl:S62-4.

Publication Stats

13 Citations
25.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Hallym University Medical Center
      • Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2010–2014
    • Hallym University
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea