Carrie L Peterson

University of Texas at Austin, Texas City, TX, United States

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Publications (4)9.57 Total impact

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    Carrie L Peterson, Steven A Kautz, Richard R Neptune
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    ABSTRACT: Muscle mechanical work is likely affected by gait abnormalities in hemiparetic walking during the paretic pre-swing phase (i.e., double support phase preceding paretic toe-off). Previous experimental studies suggest that muscle work may be decreased in the paretic leg, but paretic work may have been underestimated since experimental approaches based on net joint moments do not account for co-contraction of antagonist muscles. Also, whether the non-paretic leg does more work compared to control subjects at matched speeds and how work generation may differ between hemiparetic subjects walking with different self-selected speeds remains unknown. Three-dimensional forward dynamics simulations of two representative hemiparetic subjects walking with different self-selected speeds (i.e., limited community=0.45 m/s and community walkers=0.9 m/s) and a speed and age-matched control subject were generated to quantify musculotendon (fiber and in-series tendon) work during paretic pre-swing. Total paretic and non-paretic fiber work were increased in both the limited community and community hemiparetic walkers compared to the control. Increased fiber work in the limited community walker was primarily related to decreased fiber and tendon work by the paretic plantar flexors requiring compensatory work by other muscles. Increased fiber work in the community walker was primarily related to increased work by the hip abductors and adductors. The hemiparetic walkers would expend more metabolic energy during pre-swing if the hemiparetic and control subjects were to perform work with the same mechanical efficiency. These results may partly explain the increased metabolic cost of hemiparetic walkers compared to nondisabled walkers at matched speeds.
    Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) 05/2011; 26(8):859-66. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    Carrie L Peterson, Steven A Kautz, Richard R Neptune
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to accelerate and decelerate is important for daily activities and likely more demanding than maintaining a steady-state walking speed. Walking speed is modulated by anterior-posterior (AP) ground reaction force (GRF) impulses. The purpose of this study was to investigate AP impulses across a wide range of speeds during accelerated and decelerated walking. Kinematic and GRF data were collected from 10 healthy subjects walking on an instrumented treadmill. Subjects completed trials at steady-state speeds and at four rates of acceleration and deceleration across a speed range of 0-1.8 m/s. Mixed regression models were generated to predict AP impulses, step length and frequency from speed, and joint moment impulses from AP impulses during non-steady-state walking. Braking and propulsive impulses were positively related to speed. The braking impulse had a greater relationship with speed than the propulsive impulse, suggesting that subjects modulate the braking impulse more than the propulsive impulse to change speed. Hip and knee extensor, and ankle plantarflexor moment impulses were positively related to the braking impulse, and knee flexor and ankle plantarflexor moment impulses were positively related to the propulsive impulse. Step length and frequency increased with speed and were near the subjects' preferred combination at steady-state speeds, at which metabolic cost is minimized in nondisabled walking. Thus, these variables may be modulated to minimize metabolic cost while accelerating and decelerating. The outcomes of this work provide the foundation to investigate motor coordination in pathological subjects in response to the increased task demands of non-steady-state walking.
    Gait & posture 02/2011; 33(4):562-7. · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Forward propulsion is a central task of walking that depends on the generation of appropriate anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (AP GRFs). The AP impulse (i.e., time integral of the AP GRF) generated by the paretic leg relative to the non-paretic leg is a quantitative measure of the paretic leg's contribution to forward propulsion and is variable across hemiparetic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of propulsion generation in hemiparetic walking by identifying the biomechanical predictors of AP impulses. Three-dimensional kinematics and GRFs were recorded from 51 hemiparetic and 21 age-matched control subjects walking at similar speeds on an instrumented treadmill. Hierarchical regression models were generated for each leg to predict the AP impulse from independent biomechanical variables. Leg extension was a significant predictor and positively related to the propulsive impulse in the paretic, non-paretic and control legs. Secondarily, the hip flexor moment impulse was negatively related to the propulsive impulse. Also, the relationship of paretic and non-paretic ankle moments with the propulsive impulse depended on the paretic step ratio, suggesting the plantar flexor contribution to the propulsive impulse depends on leg angle. These results suggest that increasing paretic leg extension will increase propulsion. Increasing paretic plantar flexor output and decreasing paretic hip flexor output could also increase paretic leg propulsion. While increased pre-swing hip flexor output has been suggested to compensate for decreased plantar flexor output, such output may further impair propulsion by the paretic leg if it occurs too soon in the gait cycle.
    Gait & posture 10/2010; 32(4):451-6. · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical studies of hemiparetic walking have shown pre-swing abnormalities in the paretic leg suggesting that paretic muscle contributions to important biomechanical walking subtasks are different than those of non-disabled individuals. Three-dimensional forward dynamics simulations of two representative hemiparetic subjects with different levels of walking function classified by self-selected walking speed (i.e., limited community=0.4-0.8 m/s and community walkers = or > 0.8m/s) and a speed-matched control were generated to quantify individual muscle contributions to forward propulsion, swing initiation and power generation during the pre-swing phase (i.e., double support phase proceeding toe-off). Simulation analyses identified decreased paretic soleus and gastrocnemius contributions to forward propulsion and power generation as the primary impairment in the limited community walker compared to the control subject. The non-paretic leg did not compensate for decreased forward propulsion by paretic muscles during pre-swing in the limited community walker. Paretic muscles had the net effect to absorb energy from the paretic leg during pre-swing in the community walker suggesting that deficits in swing initiation are a primary impairment. Specifically, the paretic gastrocnemius and hip flexors (i.e., iliacus, psoas and sartorius) contributed less to swing initiation and the paretic soleus and gluteus medius absorbed more power from the paretic leg in the community walker compared to the control subject. Rehabilitation strategies aimed at diminishing these deficits have much potential to improve walking function in these hemiparetic subjects and those with similar deficits.
    Journal of biomechanics 05/2010; 43(12):2348-55. · 2.66 Impact Factor