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Publications (9)9.29 Total impact

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    Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 04/2013; 44(1):159-162. · 0.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of the wild boar (Sus scrofa) as a reservoir for a large number of pathogens that can affect both domestic animals and humans has been widely studied in the last few years. However, the impact of some of these pathogens on the health of wild boar populations is still being determined. This article presents a clinical case of severe bilateral keratoconjunctivitis affecting a 2-mo-old piglet from a semi-free range population in Spain. Histopathologic and microbiologic analysis revealed lesions in the cornea, choroid, and optical nerve, and Chlamydia suis was detected in the eyes bilaterally. The visual handicap resulting from this type of lesion greatly affects the survival of this affected piglet.
    Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 03/2013; 44(1):159-62. · 0.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Porcine brucellosis is a disease caused by Brucella suis, which is characterized by reproductive disorders in pigs. The number of cases of swine brucellosis has risen in many European countries, likely because of the presence of a wild reservoir of B. suis in wild boar. This study aimed at evaluating factors that may influence the probability of infection with Brucella spp. in wild boar and at assessing the impact of a previous contact with Brucella spp. on reproductive parameters of wild boar. Two hundred and four wild boar living in Extremadura (south-western Spain) were studied. The presence of anti-Brucella antibodies was determined using an indirect ELISA, while the presence of living bacteria in genital organs was evaluated through microbiological cultures. Sex, age, density of wild boar in summer and presence of outdoor pigs were selected as possible risk factors for being seropositive for Brucella spp. in wild boar. In addition, reproductive parameters such as breeding status or potential fertility in females and testis weight in males were estimated and related to the presence of anti-Brucella antibodies. A total of 121 animals were seropositive, resulting in a prevalence of 59.3% (95% CI). In addition, seven isolates of B. suis biovar 2 were obtained. Wild boar density in summer, as well as age and sex, was proposed as factors to explain the probability of Brucella seroconversion, although wild boar density in summer was the key factor. Current measures of reproductive parameters were not influenced by a previous contact with Brucella spp. Isolation of B. suis confirms that wild boar could represent a risk to domestic pig health in the study area. Wild boar density seems to have a great influence in the probability of infections with B. suis and suggests that density management could be useful to control Brucella infection in wild boar.
    Transboundary and Emerging Diseases 01/2013; · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current study describes the recovery of Helcococcus ovis from an adult female Verata breed goat that was euthanized because of respiratory problems and emaciation. At necropsy, the affected animal showed a purulent bronchopneumonia with scattered pulmonary abscesses and fibrous pleural adhesions. A Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped bacterium was isolated from the lung tissue and confirmed as H. ovis by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing.
    Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation: official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc 01/2012; 24(1):235-7. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Swine erysipelas (SE) is a disease caused by the bacterium Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and is one of the best-known and most serious diseases affecting domestic pigs. However, few studies exist concerning the susceptibility of wild boars to this disease and the role of this species as a reservoir. This study investigates and describes an outbreak of SE that occurred on a semi-intensive wild boar breeding farm housing 40 boars in Extremadura (SW Spain) on 11-18 February 2010. Seven animals died, of which four were examined post-mortem. Of these, three (two females and one male) were approximately 3 months old, and one was 1 year old (male). Lesions were consistent with acute septicaemia, consisting of cutaneous erythema/cyanosis and petechial haemorrhages in kidneys, urinary bladder, lungs and meninges. The 1-year-old male also had proliferative polyarthritis. Histopathology confirmed the presence of disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis. Additionally, a bilateral acute panuveitis with concurrent necrotizing vasculitis and diffuse corneal oedema, neither of which have been described before in this disease, were found in the 3-month-old male boar. E. rhusiopathiae was isolated from all four animals in pure cultures from several tissues. Of these four animals, antibodies against E. rhusiopathiae, using an indirect ELISA test, were only detected in the 1-year-old male boar with polyarthritis. Posteriorly, of nine live adults tested for antibodies, four (including an adult male with polyarthritis) were positive.
    Transboundary and Emerging Diseases 06/2011; 58(5):445-50. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cats are frequent carriers of Microsporum canis and veterinary students are at high risk of exposure and acquisition of the organism a la infección. An outbreak of zoonotic ringworm carried by a litter of stray cats is described. Four veterinary students, four dogs, and six cats living in five separate locations were affected. All had direct or indirect contact with the infected kitten litter. We tried to identify the causal dermatophyte. Conventional and mycological culture methods were used. Microscopic features of scrapings and hairs treated with 20% KOH strongly suggested a M. canis etiology, and a diagnosis of ringworm was empirically supported by successful treatment of humans and animals. Nevertheless, cultures failed to show the expected morphology. Culture features of our strain are compared with those described by other authors for dysgonic M. canis strains. Epidemiological features are also discussed.
    Revista Iberoamericana de Micología 03/2010; 27(2):62-5. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important group of emerging pathogens, with ruminants recognised as their main natural reservoir. The aim of this longitudinal study was to provide information on the prevalence and existence of seasonal variation in the occurrence of non-O157 STEC in four sheep flocks over a 12-month period. A total of 504 faecal samples from 48 adult sheep in four flocks were collected and examined for STEC using both phenotypic and genotypic methods. STEC were isolated from 407 (80.8%) faecal samples representing all the animals sampled. The overall monthly prevalence of STEC varied between 71.1 and 94.4% and no seasonal variation in the occurrence of STEC could be observed over the study period. A total of 521 STEC isolates were characterised. The PCR procedure indicated that 275 (52.8%) isolates carried the stx 1 gene, 44 (8.4%) carried the stx 2 gene and 202 (38.8%) contained both of these genes. The eae and ehxA genes were detected in 4 (0.8%) and 368 (70.6%) isolates, respectively. The isolates belonged to 28 O serogroups, although 72.4% were restricted to only 10 serogroups (O5, O6, O76, O87, O91, O123, O128, O146, O166 and O176). None of the isolates belonged to the O157 STEC serogroup. STEC isolates of serogroups O33, O53, O105 and O162 have not previously been reported in sheep. This is the first study to report the maintenance of high frequencies of non-O157 STEC infection in sheep flocks over long time periods. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
    Small Ruminant Research 01/2010; 93(2-3):144-148. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium novyi was the suspected cause of death of two mature gestating Iberian-breed sows, on evidence of a gas-filled necrotic liver, rapid decomposition and tympany of the carcasses, and the absence of any other detectable cause of death. Anaerobic cultures yielded large numbers of Clostridium-like organisms, and C novyi type B was identified using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. In cases of unexpected mortality in gestating sows, veterinarians need to be aware of the most common causes of death, including C novyi infection. In order to achieve a correct diagnosis, it is essential to perform a postmortem examination and collect samples as soon as possible after death. In addition, use of PCR procedures may allow rapid identification of C novyi and the types implicated.
    Journal of Swine Health and Production 01/2009; 17(5):264-268. · 0.63 Impact Factor
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