Derek F Amanatullah

California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States

Are you Derek F Amanatullah?

Claim your profile

Publications (23)23.45 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The optimal management of pathologic long bone lesions remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of defect depth on the torsional properties of the distal femur. A laterally placed distal metaphyseal cylindrical defect was milled in the cortex of the distal femur in 20 composite models. The proximal extent of the defects was constant. By decreasing the radius of the cylinder that intersected this predefined cord, 4 different radii defining 4 different depths of resection of the distal femur were created for testing: 17%, 33%, 50%, and 67% cortical defects, when normalized to the width of the femur at the level of resection. Each femur was mounted into a hydraulic axial/torsion materials testing machine and each specimen underwent torsional stiffness testing and torsional failure in external rotation. The specimens with less than a 33% cortical loss consistently demonstrated a superiorly oriented spiral fracture pattern, while the specimens with greater than a 50% cortical loss consistently demonstrated an inferiorly oriented transverse fracture pattern. The cortical defects were all statistically (P<.05) less stiff in torsion as the defect grew larger. There was a strong linear correlation between the mean torsional stiffness and cortical defect size (r(2)=0.977). This observation is supported by finite element analysis. The amount of femur remaining is crucial to stability. This biomechanical analysis predicts a critical loss of torsional integrity when a cortical defect approaches 50% of the width of the femur. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(3):158-162].
    Orthopedics 03/2014; 37(3):158-62. · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Identify at-risk populations for giant cell tumor of bone. 2. Recognize the biology that drives giant cell tumor of bone. 3. Describe modern surgical and adjuvant techniques to effectively treat giant cell tumor of bone. 4. Recognize the complications associated with radiation therapy, poor resection, and adjuvant treatments. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a benign, locally aggressive bone tumor. Giant cell tumor of bone primarily affects the young adult patient population. The natural history of GCT is progressive bone destruction leading to joint deformity and disability. Surgery is the primary mode of treatment, but GCT has a tendency to recur locally despite a range of adjuvant surgical options. Pulmonary metastasis has been described. However, systemic spread of GCT rarely becomes progressive, leading to death. This review presents the clinicopathologic features of GCT and a historical perspective that highlights the current rationale and contro-versies regarding the treatment of GCT. [Orthopedics. 2014;37(2):112-120.].
    Orthopedics 02/2014; 37(2):112-20. · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Several risk factors for dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been identified including operative-, patient-, and implant-related factors. The following case report describes the dislocation of a revision THA without disruption of the constrained liner or containment ring. The possible mechanisms leading to this type of failure include lever-out impingement and poor abductor function, or tension secondary to prior surgery. Dislocation without disruption of containment ring has not been described for the Pinnacle Acetabular Cup with the Enhanced Stability Constrained Liner (DePuy Orthopaedics, Warsaw, Indiana).
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 12/2013; 42(12):566-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Incorrect registration during computer assisted total knee arthroplasty (CA-TKA) leads to malposition of implants. Our aim was to evaluate the tolerable error in anatomic landmark registration. We incorrectly registered the femoral epicondyles, femoral and tibial centers, as well as the malleoli and documented the change in angulation or rotation. We found that the distal femoral epicondyles were the most difficult anatomic landmarks to register. The other bony landmarks were more forgiving. Identification of the distal femoral epicondyles has a high inter-observer and intra-observer variability. Our observation that there is less than 2mm of safe zone in the anterior or posterior direction during registration of the medial and lateral epicondyles may explain the inability of CA-TKA to improve upon the outcomes of conventional TKA.
    The Journal of arthroplasty 04/2013; · 1.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteonecrosis of the hip accounts for about 10% of all total hip arthroplasty cases and presents a significant challenge for those patients with and without femoral head collapse. Subtrochanteric femur fractures have been reported with numerous types of proximal femoral implants. Care must be taken to avoid penetrating the lateral cortex of the proximal femur inferior to the distal border of the lesser trochanter. Core decompression requires a 3 mm to 20 mm defect in the lateral femoral cortex. Subtrochanteric femur fractures are a well-known complication of core decompression as well. We present a case of a subtrochanteric fracture following the removal of a porous tantalum implant.
    Case reports in orthopedics. 01/2013; 2013:946745.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type-1 motif) zinc metalloproteinases are important during the synthesis and breakdown of cartilage extracellular matrix. ADAMTS-12 is upregulated during in-vitro chondrogenesis and embryonic limb development, however the regulation of ADAMTS-12 expression in cartilage remains unknown. The transcription factor c-Maf is a member of Maf family of basic ZIP (bZIP) transcription factors. Expression of c-Maf is highest in hypertrophic chondrocytes during embryonic develop- ment and postnatal growth. We hypothesized that c-Maf and ADAMTS-12 are co-expressed during chondrocyte differentiation and that c-Maf regulates ADAMTS-12 expression during chondrogenesis. Design: Promoter analysis and species alignments identified potential c-Maf binding sites in the ADAMTS-12 promoter. c-Maf and ADAMTS-12 co-expression was moni- tored during chondrogenesis of stem cell pellet cultures. Luciferase expression driven by ADAMTS-12 promoter segments was measured in the presence and absence of c-Maf, and syn- thetic oligonucleotides were used to confirm specific binding of c-Maf to ADAMTS-12 promoter sequences. Results: In-vitro chondrogenesis from human mesenchymal stem cells revealed co- expression of ADAMTS-12 and c-Maf during differentiation. Truncation and point mutations of the ADAMTS-12 promoter evaluated in reporter assays localized the response to the proximal 315 bp of the ADAMTS-12 promoter, which contained a predicted c-Maf recognition element (MARE) at position -61. Electorphoretic-mobility-shift-assay confirmed that c-Maf directly in- teracted with the MARE at position -61. Conclusions: These data suggest that c-Maf is involved in chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy, at least in part, through the regulation of ADAMTS-12 expression at a newly identified MARE in its proximal promoter.
    Cartilage 12/2012;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections are a well-documented risk of surgery and are becoming increasingly difficult to treat owing to continued acquired resistance. A new antibiotic for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus is telavancin. CASE DESCRIPTION: A patient at our institution was prescribed telavancin for multiple spinal abscesses before spinal surgery. Routine preoperative testing revealed an international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.05 with no clear cause. Careful review of the patient's medication history and prescriber information revealed that telavancin may interfere with prothrombin time (PT/INR) testing. In vitro testing by our laboratory confirmed an association between telavancin dose and an increase in PT/INR. An alternative reagent for PT/INR testing unaffected by telavancin dose revealed a PT/INR of 0.97. LITERATURE REVIEW: Telavancin interacts with artificial phospholipid surfaces used to monitor coagulation while having no actual effect on coagulation. PURPOSES AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: All physicians, especially orthopaedic surgeons, should be aware of the effects of telavancin and ensure proper measures are taken to acquire the true INR by switching the reagent used to test PT/INR or ensuring the PT/INR is drawn before telavancin dosing.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 11/2012; · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Traditional surgical approaches often involve making large skin incisions and extensively dissecting healthy tissue to access diseased anatomy. Obviously more desirable is to make smaller incisions and more focused dissections and achieve the same postsurgical outcomes. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is gaining popularity in many orthopedic fields, but MIS techniques are not without risk. Continued use of these techniques is a topic of debate. If alignment is satisfactory with MIS, and if the complication rates of MIS are similar to those of traditional approaches, it seems sensible to consider the less invasive approaches to enable earlier patient recovery and improve cosmesis. Skeptics claim that there is no advantage in using MIS over time-tested approaches and are concerned that MIS approaches are being implemented before being properly subjected to peer review.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 10/2012; 41(10):E140-4.
  • Derek F Amanatullah, Shintaro Yamane, A Hari Reddi
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hyaline articular cartilage will not heal spontaneously, and lesions in hyaline articular cartilage often result in degenerative joint disease. Considerable progress has been made with respect to the responsive stem cells, inductive signals and extracellular scaffolding required for the optimal regeneration of cartilage. However, many challenges remain, such as topographic differences in the functional zones of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that a distinct set of differentially expressed genes define the surface, middle and deep zones of hyaline articular cartilage. Microarray analysis of bovine articular cartilage from the superficial and middle zones revealed 52 genes differentially expressed ≥ 10-fold and 114 additional genes differentially expressed ≥ five-fold. However, no genes were identified with a ≥ five-fold difference in expression when comparing articular cartilage from the middle and deep zones. There are distinct, differential gene expression patterns in the superficial and middle zones of hyaline articular cartilage that highlight the functional differences between these zones. This investigation has implications for the tissue engineering and regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 07/2012; · 2.83 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Expression of chondrocyte-specific genes is regulated by mechanical force. However, despite the progress in identifying the signal transduction cascades that activate expression of mechanoresponsive genes, little is known about the transcription factors that activate transcription of mechanoresponsive genes. The DNA elements that confer mechanoresponsiveness within a cartilage gene promoter have yet to be identified. We have established an experimental system to identify the DNA elements and transcription factors that mediate the mechanoresponse of a promoter to nominal compressive stress in primary human chondrocytes and stem cells in a three-dimensional culture system. Our results demonstrate that the proximal 3 Kb of the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter is sufficient to mediate a mechanoresponse in human articular chondrocytes and stem cells, and that the magnitude of mechanoresponse correlates to the regulation of the endogenous gene at the RNA and protein level. This information is critical to understanding how mechanical force regulates the transcriptional activation of cartilage genes in three-dimensional culture.
    Tissue Engineering Part A 07/2012; 18(17-18):1882-9. · 4.64 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Oblique fractures of the medial malleolus can arise from the application of axial force at various anatomic positions of the ankle, including supination-external rotation, pronation-external rotation, or pronation abduction. Although a variety of techniques exist to provide fixation of horizontal medial malleolus fractures, the optimal technique and pattern for internal fixation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of four different fixation methods for fractures of the medial malleolus. Identical oblique osteotomies were created in synthetic distal tibiae using a jig. The specimens were divided into four fixation groups: contoured 2.0 mm mini-fragment T-plate, figure-of-eight tension band wire, construct two parallel 4.0 mm cancellous screws, and two divergent 4.0 mm cancellous screws. The specimens were tested using offset axial tension at 10 mm/min until 2 mm of joint line displacement. The average stiffness in tension and force at 2 mm of joint line displacement of the plate construct was significantly greater than any of the other constructs (p < 0.05), whereas the average stiffness in tension of the other three groups were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). Using a contoured 2.0 mm mini-fragment T-plate as the method of fixation resulted in an at least 25% stiffer construct during tension and required at least 24% more force for 2 mm of joint line displacement when compared with more traditional methods of fixation in an osteotomy model of an oblique medial malleolus fracture.
    The journal of trauma and acute care surgery. 04/2012; 72(4):948-53.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study qualified and evaluated the mechanical properties of three different screw orientations used for fixation of vertical shear fractures of the medial malleolus. Identical vertical osteotomies were created in synthetic distal tibiae using a jig. The specimens were assigned to one of the three fixation groups (n = 8 per group): (1) parallel: two 40 mm length, 4.0 mm diameter screws placed parallel to each other in the transverse plane; (2) convergent: two 40 mm length, 4.0 mm diameter screws placed 25 degree convergent to each other in the transverse plane; and (3) divergent: two 40 mm length, 4.0 mm diameter screws placed 15 degree divergent to each other in the transverse plane. The specimens were tested using offset axial loading at 1 mm/s until 2 mm of displacement. The average stiffness was 102 N/mm ± 51 N/mm for the parallel group, 109 N/mm ± 37 N/mm for the convergent group, and 185 N/mm ± 73 N/mm for the divergent group. The average stiffness of the divergent group was significantly greater than either the parallel (p < 0.05) or convergent (p < 0.05) groups. The divergent group was 81.4% more stiff than the parallel group and 69.7% more stiff than the convergent group. The average load at 2 mm of displacement was 324 N ± 87 N for the parallel group, 373 N ± 95 N for the convergent group, and 512 N ± 170 N for the divergent group. The average load at failure of the divergent group was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than the parallel groups. The divergent group was required 58.0% more force at 2 mm of displacement than the parallel group and 37.3% more force at 2 mm of displacement than the convergent group. The use of a divergent screw pattern resulted in a stiffer fixation construct that requires more force for 2 mm of displacement when used to stabilize an osteotomy model of vertical shear medial malleolus fractures.
    The journal of trauma and acute care surgery. 03/2012; 72(3):751-4.
  • Derek F Amanatullah, Amir A Jamali
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A low-contact stress, high-congruity, mobile-bearing patellofemoral joint arthroplasty decreases the contact force in the patellofemoral joint, theoretically reducing patellar polyethylene wear and increasing implant longevity. This article describes the case of a 47-year-old obese woman who presented with pain and loss of extension after a low-contact stress, high-congruity, mobile-bearing patellofemoral joint arthroplasty. Radiographs revealed dislocation (ie, spinout) of the patellar polyethylene. Patellar polyethylene spinout is a rare complication of metal-backed, mobile-bearing patellar resurfacing. Theoretically, patellar polyethylene spinout in low-contact stress, high-congruity, mobile-bearing patellofemoral arthroplasty is related to implant design and the placement of the metal base plate. Ultimately, the articulation of low-contact stress, high-congruity, mobile-bearing patellofemoral arthroplasty may be too congruent to resist the forces of the patellofemoral joint, particularly in patients who are obese, and the patellar rotation allowed by this articulation may not be sufficient for all patients. Should patellar spinout occur, replacement of the polyethylene is not sufficient to correct the problem; hence, revision of the patellar and trochlear components is required because it remains unclear whether failure is secondary to patellar or trochlear design deficiencies.
    Orthopedics 01/2012; 35(2):e272-6. · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Derek F Amanatullah, Eric J Strauss, Paul E Di Cesare
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a multifactorial disease that can result in significant clinical morbidity and affects patients of any age, including young and active patients. Late sequelae of femoral head osteonecrosis include femoral head collapse and subsequent degeneration of the hip joint. A high index of suspicion and improved radiographic evaluation allow orthopedic surgeons to identify this disease at an earlier stage. Current management options for hip osteonecrosis have results that vary according to patient population and disease stage. Modifications of older techniques, as well as emerging technologies, have led to the development of management strategies that may be able to alter the course of femoral head osteonecrosis.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 10/2011; 40(10):E216-25.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteoid osteoma is the most common bone-producing tumor that typically presents with "throbbing night pain" and that improves dramatically with use of low-dose salicylates. Few cases of pelvic osteoid osteoma have been reported, and most have involved patients younger than age 30. Surgical excision classically has been the treatment of choice, but, recently, less invasive modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, have begun to supplant surgical management of osteoid osteoma, resulting in a decrease in the need for definitive surgical diagnosis and treatment. We present a rare case of osteoid osteoma in the pelvis of a woman older than age 30.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 09/2011; 40(9):476-8.
  • Source
    Derek F Amanatullah, Eric J Strauss, Paul E Di Cesare
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a multifactorial disease that can result in significant clinical morbidity and affects patients of any age, including young and active patients. Late sequelae of femoral head osteonecrosis include femoral head collapse and subsequent degeneration of the hip joint. A high index of suspicion and improved radiographic evaluation allow orthopedic surgeons to identify this disease at an earlier stage. Current management options for hip osteonecrosis have results that vary according to patient population and disease stage. Modifications of older techniques, as well as emerging technologies, have led to the development of management strategies that may be able to alter the course of femoral head osteonecrosis.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 09/2011; 40(9):E186-92.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Appropriate implant alignment is a major goal of total joint arthroplasty. Obtaining appropriate alignment typically involves making intraoperative decisions in response to visual and tactile feedback. Integrated computer-based systems provide the option of continuous real-time feedback and offer the potential to decrease intraoperative errors while enhancing the surgical learning experience. Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery helps the surgeon perform both intraoperative and postoperative technical audits of implant alignment. Improving implant alignment can be correlated with improved long-term clinical outcomes. However, despite emerging data, many surgeons remain wary of computer-assisted orthopedic surgery.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 08/2011; 40(8):419-26.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The results of a prospective multicenter trial comparing 357 hips randomized to total hip arthroplasty with either ceramic-ceramic or ceramic-polyethylene couplings are presented. No statistically significant difference in clinical outcomes scores between the ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-polyethylene groups was observed at any time interval. The mean linear rate was statistically lower (P < .001) in the ceramic-ceramic group (30.5 μm/year) when compared with the ceramic-polyethylene group (218.2 μm/year). The rates of ceramic implant fracture (2.6%) and audible component-related noise (3.1%) were statistically higher in the ceramic-ceramic group when compared with the ceramic-polyethylene group (P < .05). Lastly, there was no statistically significant difference in the dislocation or revision rate between the groups at the time of last clinical follow-up.
    The Journal of arthroplasty 06/2011; 26(6 Suppl):72-7. · 1.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study is a retrospective evaluation of the intermediate-term results of 26 consecutive revision total hip arthroplasties performed with a modular titanium, uncemented femoral component. The average patient age at the time of revision total hip arthroplasty was 72 years, and there were an equal number of males and females. The mean follow-up was 5.7 years (ranging from 4 to 11 years). No re-revision was necessary during this follow-up time. The mean Harris hip score improved significantly (preoperative and postoperative score was 50.7 and 89.6, respectively; P < .001). Postoperatively, Short Form 36 functional scores averaged 67.7 across 9 functional parameters. Our observed low revision rate and favorable patient-reported outcome scores support the continuous use of modular titanium, uncemented femoral components in revision total hip arthroplasty.
    The Journal of arthroplasty 04/2011; 26(8):1451-4. · 1.79 Impact Factor
  • Shima C Sokol, Derek F Amanatullah, Shane Curtiss, Robert M Szabo
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We compare the biomechanical properties of a volar hybrid construct to an all-locking construct in an osteoporotic and normal comminuted distal radius fracture model. Groups of 28 normal, 28 osteoporotic, and 28 over-drilled osteoporotic left distal radius synthetic bones were used. The normal group consisted of synthetic bone with a standard foam core. The osteoporotic group consisted of synthetic bone with decreased foam core density. The over-drilled osteoporotic group consisted of synthetic bone with decreased foam core density and holes drilled with a 2.3 mm drill, instead of the standard 2.0 mm drill, to simulate the lack of purchase in osteoporotic bone. Within each group, 14 synthetic bones were plated with a volar locking plate using an all-locking screw construct, and 14 synthetic bones were plated with a volar locking plate using a hybrid screw construct (ie, both locking and nonlocking screws). A 1-cm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created with the apex 2 cm from the volar surface of the lunate facet. Each specimen was mounted to a materials testing machine, using a custom-built, standardized axial compression jig. Axial compression was delivered at 1 N/s over 3 cycles from 20 N to 100 N to establish stiffness. Each sample was stressed to failure at 1 mm/s until 5 mm of permanent deformation occurred. Our results show no difference in construct stiffness and load at failure between the all-locking and hybrid constructs in the normal, osteoporotic, or over-drilled osteoporotic synthetic bone models. All specimens failed by plate bending at the osteotomy site with loss of height. Although volar locking plates are commonly used for the treatment of distal radius fractures, the ideal screw configuration has not been determined. Hybrid fixation has comparable biomechanical properties to all locking constructs in the fixation of metaphyseal fractures about the knee and shoulder and might also have a role in the fixation of distal radius fractures.
    The Journal of hand surgery 04/2011; 36(4):591-7. · 1.33 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

25 Citations
23.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • California State University, Sacramento
      Sacramento, California, United States
  • 2012
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • University of California, Davis
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Davis, CA, United States