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Publications (2)2.09 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Salmonellosis is largely a major foodborne disease. However, contact with animals particularly reptiles, has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for Salmonella infection among children. The major risk factors for salmonellosis in Michigan children have not been assessed. Therefore, we have evaluated the association between Salmonella infections and contact with animals among Michigan children aged ≤ 10 years by conducting a population-based case-control study. A total of 123 children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. A multivariable analysis matched on age group revealed that children with Salmonella infections had reported more commonly than controls contact with reptiles [adjusted matched odds ratio (MOR) = 7.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52-41.01] and cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14-5.88). Results of this study suggest an association between salmonellosis and contact with cats and reptiles in Michigan children. Additional efforts are needed to educate caretakers of young children about the risk of Salmonella transmission through animal contact.
    Zoonoses and Public Health 02/2010; 57(7-8):e170-6. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infections with Salmonella serotypes continue to be a significant global public health problem. In addition to contaminated foods, several other sources contribute to infections with Salmonella serotypes. We have assessed the role of socioeconomic factors, exposure to food, and environmental sources in the etiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. A case-control study among Michigan children aged </= 10 years was conducted. A total of 123 cases of children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. The cases and controls were matched on age-category (<1 year, 2-<6 years and 6-10 years). Data on socioeconomic status, food intake, and environmental exposures, were collected on the queried case and control subjects. After adjusting for race and household-income the final regression multivariable model revealed that Salmonella infections were significantly associated with attendance of a daycare center (adjusted matched odds ratio = 5.00, 95% CI: 1.51 - 16.58), contact with cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14 - 5.88), and contact with reptiles (MOR = 7.90, 95% CI: 1.52 - 41.01), during the 3 days prior to the onset of child's illness. Study results suggest that exposure to environmental sources may play an important role in sporadic infections with Salmonella serotypes in children. Additional efforts are needed to educate parents and caretakers about the risk of Salmonella transmission to children from these sources.
    BMC Research Notes 01/2010; 3:105.