Bolanle A Adeniyi

University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria

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Publications (38)47.91 Total impact

  • International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research 07/2014; 5(7):2642-2650. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    Bamidele T Odumosu, Bolanle A Adeniyi, Ram Chandra
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    ABSTRACT: Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbours integrons and other mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons, which easily disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinical strains of P. aeruginosa.MethodologyPlasmid extraction of 54 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was carried out by alkaline lysis method; and plasmid size estimation was done by using E. coli V517 standard plasmid marker. Fifty-four clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from 5 hospitals in 3 Southwestern states of Nigeria between March and September 2010. Plasmid extraction of isolates was carried out by alkaline lysis method; and plasmid size estimation was done by using E. coli V517 standard plasmid marker. PCR amplification for the 3 classes of resistance integrons, and gene cassette characterization were carried out using specific primers and by sequencing of PCR products. Conjugal mating of the integron positive P. aeruginosa strains with E. coli DH5alpha was performed to demonstrate transferability of integrons and gene cassettes.ResultAgarose gel electrophoresis of plasmid DNA revealed that all the 54 P. aeruginosa harboured 1--4 plasmids with sizes ranging from 2.2 -- >58 kb. Class 1 integron was identified in 31 (57%) strains; but none of them carried class 2 and class 3 integrons. High prevalence of aadA gene conferring resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin was detected in the strains positive for class 1 integron. Sequencing of the 1.6 kb and 1.2 kb amplified band of gene cassettes revealed the presence of aadA6-orfD and aadA13 respectively. This study demonstrates the presence of plasmids and integrons harbouring resistance gene cassettes, which may collectively constitute an efficient system for dissemination of resistance genes in P. aeruginosa. Disturbingly, the rapid and unabated spread of class 1 integron-associated multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa in Southwest Nigeria may greatly hamper successful treatment of infections caused by such strains. This necessitates the establishment of functional antimicrobial resistance surveillance programmes in Nigeria.
    Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials 10/2013; 12(1):29. · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oils obtained from the leaves and stem of Zanthoxylum leprieurii, Z. macrophylla and Z. rubescens were tested against seven bacteria strains and two yeast associated with genitourinary tract infections. The leaf and bark oils of Z. leprieurii were the most effective in inhibiting the growth of these organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils ranged between 7.8 to 62.5 μg/mL. The antimicrobial activity of the oil of Z. leprieurii unlocks new usage of the plant in ethnomedicinal practice and possible new drug formulation. The tested oils were not effective against C. albicans and Yeast.
    Journal of essential oil-bearing plants JEOP 03/2013; 13(4):496-502. · 0.29 Impact Factor
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    • Adeniyi B.A, Odumosu B.T
    09/2012;
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    09/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains one of the most dreaded resistant pathogens mostly encountered in infections worldwide. However; serious infections due to this bacterium are predominantly hospital-acquired. This present study is aimed at investigating the resistance patterns and susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitals in Southwest Nigeria. A total of 54 unrelated clinical strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from 5 hospitals in Southwest Nigeria comprises of 38.9% isolated from urine, 20.4% from wounds, and 11.1% from pus while the remaining 29.6% were distributed among other clinical sites. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for 21 antibiotics and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was done by disk diffusion and E-test method respectively. Each isolate was resistant to ≥ 3 classes of antibiotics, 24 (44.44%) were resistant to 4 ̶ 9 antibiotics; 17 (31.48%) were resistant to 10 ̶ 13 antibiotics; 11(20.37%) were resistant to 14 – 16 antibiotics and 2 (3.70%) were resistant to 17 – 19 antibiotics. Thirty (55.55%) isolates were resistant to ≥ 10 antibiotics. High rates of resistance were recorded for ampicillin (100%), tetracycline (100%), amoxicillin/clavulanate acid (100%), ticarcillin/clavulanate acid (87.0%), kanamycin (79.6%), carbenicillin (63.0%) and cefotaxime (46.3%). Highest number of susceptible isolates (98.1%) and (92.6%) were recorded for colistin and imipenem respectively. The highest MIC recorded for cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin, and amikacin were 30, 240, 240, 240, and 256μg/ml respectively. The resistance profiles observed in this study suggest a prevalence of P. aeruginosa strains harbouring multiple resistance mechanisms in Southwest Nigeria, which could limit available therapeutic options for infections caused by these multidrug resistant strains.
    International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research. 07/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacillus that is associated with the development of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). In Nigeria, leaf extracts of Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell. are used in traditional medicine to treat PUD and other gastrointestinal ailments. The additive and synergistic effects of E. torelliana leaf extracts, in combination with clarithromycin, were investigated using two types of H. pylori strains (ATCC 43629, ATCC 43579) and four clinical isolates of H. pylori (Ed, A2, G1-1, 5514) in the checkerboard assay and the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. A time-kill study was also performed on the strain ATCC 43579. The results showed that the E. torelliana extract inhibited the growth of all H. pylori strains, and the addition of one of the isolated active compounds, namely compound 2 (a substituted pyrenyl ester) enhanced the activity of clarithromycin. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of clarithromycin and the botanical compound were reduced twofold (from 0.125 to 0.0625 µg/mL and > 100 to 50 µg/mL respectively). A 100% reduction in CFU/mL of H. pylori ATCC 43579 was observed with the combination of 0.25 µg/mL clarithromycin and 100 µg/mL and 200 µg/mL compound 2 after 3 h of exposure. The results of the investigation showed that the combination of botanical compounds and antibiotics may be beneficial in the treatment of H. pylori infections. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 02/2012; 26(9):1393-8. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    African journal of microbiology research 01/2012; Vol. 6:3399-3402. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori consist in a helical shaped Gram-negative bacterium, approximately 3 micrometers long with a diameter of approximately 0.5 micrometers. It has 4-6 flagella. It is microaerophilic and tests positive for oxidase, catalase and urease. With its flagella, the bacterium moves through the stomach lumen and drills into the mucus gel layer of the stomach. In humans, H. pylori have been associated with peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis, duodenitis and stomach cancer. It is widely believed that in the absence of treatment, H. pylori infection, once established in its gastric niche, persists for life. The aim of this research is to study the cultural characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of H. pylori strains isolated from southwest Nigeria. The cultural characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from gastric mucosal antral biopsy specimens collected from 43 of 52 dyspepsia patients in the University College Hospital Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, were determined using standard microbiological methods for Helicobacter pylori isolation. The 43 isolates were subjected to 23 different antibiotics and each of the antibiotics demonstrated a variable degree of activity against the isolates. Among the antibiotics to which the organism was most susceptible are: ofloxacin (30 μg) 100% activity, ciprofloxacin (5 μg) 97.67% activity, gentamicin (120 μg) 95.35 activity, amikacin (30 μg), kanamycin (30 μg) and chloramphenicol (30 μg) each 90.70% activity, clarithromycin (15 μg) 93.02, while the less active antibiotics are: augmentin (30 μg) 23.26% active, amoxycillin (25 μg) and metronidazole (50 μg) each 27.91% active and clindamycin (2 mg) 30.23% active. From the result of the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the strains of the organism, 95.35% of the total isolates are multi drug resistant. Resistance was developed to, among others, augmentin (30 μg), amoxycillin (25 μg), metronidazole (50 μg) and clindamycin (2 mg).
    Gastroenterology Insights. 01/2012; Vol. 4(e 21):87-89.
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils hydrodistilled from the leaves and stems of the Zanthoxylum leprieurii, Z. macrophylla and Z. rubescens were analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS). Fifteen to twenty-eight compounds were identified representing 99.9–78.7% of the oil compositions. The chemical profile of the leaf and stem oils of Z. rubescens were dominated by sesquiterpenoid compounds (E)-nerolidol (44.4–70.2%, respectively) and β-caryophyllene (22.1%). Monoterpenoid was the major class of compounds found in the leaf oil of Z. macrophylla with linalool accounting for 80.5% of the oil composition, while linalool (28.9%), (E)-nerolidol (12.4%), β-bisabolene (10.4%) and caryophyllene oxide (7.6%) were the major compounds identified in the stem oil. Zanthoxylum leprieurii leaf oil had limonene (94.9%) as the main constituent The stem oil of Z. leprieurii was dominated by sesquiterpenoids with (E)-neroidol (23.0%), humuenol (17.5%) and elemol (5.7%) as major constituents.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 12/2011; 20(1):69-71. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (Myrtaceae) and Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell are used in Nigerian traditional medicine for the treatment of cough associated with tuberculosis (TB) and other respiratory infections. Hexane, chloroform, methanol extracts, and isolated compounds of E. camaldulensis and E. torelliana were screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtbH37Rv) to authenticate the traditional use of these plants. The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) method was used to investigate the anti-M. tuberculosis activities. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the hexane extract of E. torelliana leaf was performed, and isolated compounds were characterized by MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. The extracts inhibited the growth of MtbH37Rv [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 4-64 µg/mL]. Spectroscopic characterization led to the identification of two compounds, hydroxymyristic acid methylester (1) and a substituted pyrenyl ester, a sterol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 had MIC of 49.45 and 46.99 µg/mL; IC(50) >100 and 38.21 µg/mL; selectivity index (SI) >2.02 and 0.81, respectively, and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 62.50 µg/mL. The anti-TB activities of these plants on M. tuberculosis H37Rv support their use in traditional medicine for the treatment of coughs associated with TB and reveals the presence of anti-Mtb active compounds in the plants. These findings not only demonstrate a new potential area of therapeutic value of E. camaldulensis and E. torelliana, but also illustrate the role of esters as anti-Mtb active principles in ethnobotanical preparations and as lead compounds in the development of new and effective anti-Mtb drugs.
    Pharmaceutical Biology 12/2011; 50(1):92-8. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell. (Myrtaceae) were screened against four non-tuberculous mycobacteria species: Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 684, Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 19420, Mycobacterium phlei ATCC 19240 and Mycobacterium abscessus. The agar diffusion method was used to investigate the activity of these plants at 1 and 2 mg/ml concentration. The methanol extracts exhibited the highest activity against the test organisms, the most susceptible being M. fortuitum ATCC 684. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for the bioactive extracts ranged between 1 to 2 mg/ml while minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) value was 2 to 4 mg/ml. Bactericidal activity of the methanol extracts of E. camaldulensis on M. fortuitum ATCC 684 was investigated using the viable counting technique. The leaf extracts at 4 mg/ml (4 × MIC) and 8 mg/ml (8 × MIC) gave 80.49 and 100% kill of the organism respectively at 24 h exposure time while the stem bark extracts at the same concentrations afforded 67.35 and 100% kill respectively after 24 h of exposure. The activities demonstrated by these plants support their use in the treatment of cough associated with most pulmonary diseases; and suggest that these plants may be of therapeutic importance for the treatment of infections caused by the non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).
    African journal of microbiology research 11/2011; 5:3652-3657. · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The characterisation of 24 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates from Nigerian traditional fermented dairy foods, including some cow's intestine isolates, was conducted in order to select isolates for potential use as probiotics. LAB isolates were identified by partial sequencing the 16S rRNA gene as belonging to the species Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus brevis and mainly Weissella confusa. At the end of a characterisation process, 2 L. paracasei and 2 W. confusa isolates were selected, and their resistance to a simulated gastrointestinal digestion and their ability to adhere to eukaryotic cell lines were assessed. The survival to the simulated gastrointestinal passage was higher when bacterial suspensions were made in skimmed milk (2.0±0.8 log units reduction) or at the simulated gastric juice pH 3 (2.7±0.9 log units reduction) than at pH 2.0 (5.5±0.7 log units reduction). Adhesion of LAB to both intestinal and vaginal epithelial models was comparable or higher than that of the reference Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. However, some of the isolates increased the adhesion of the pathogen Escherichia coli LMG2092 to HT-29 and HeLa monolayers. Overall, isolates L. paracasei UI14 and W. confusa UI7 are good candidates for further studying potential benefits that support their use as probiotics. This is one of the few articles reporting the characterisation and the probiotic potential of Weissella, although more studies are needed in order to establish their safety for potential probiotic applications.
    International journal of food microbiology 05/2011; 147(2):97-104. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Objective: Diagnostic tests currently in use for the detection of Helicobacter pylori have been classified into either non-invasive or invasive categories, with each having its merits and demerits, as well as superiority over the other depending on the clinical setting. This study compared the accuracy of the urea breath test, histology, serology and stool antigen assay using culture as the gold standard in the diagnosis in our clinical setting. Method: Blood, stool, fibre-optic endoscopic gastric biopsies and breath were tested in 52 consenting dyspeptic patients for the detection of H. pylori infection. Results: The Negative Predictive Values, Positive Predictive Values and the diagnostic accuracy obtained were 40%, 73.7%, 47.1%; 8.3% 80.6%, 62.5%; 12.5%, 94.1%, 68%; and 30%, 93.8%, 69% for Faecal antigen test, Serology, Histology and Urea breath test respectively. Conclusion: Our findings show that histology is reliable for definitive diagnosis of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients in our setting and where facilities are available; UBT can be used as a non-invasive method of assessment of eradication of infection.
    Nigerian Journal of Gastrienterology and Hepatology. 01/2011; Vol. 3:31-38.
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    ABSTRACT: The investigation of the essential oils of the aerial part and rhizomes of Kyllinga erecta by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) led to the Identification of 31 and 49 compounds respectively. The oil of the aerial parts had 1,8-cineole (10.5%), α-humulene (21.7%), farnesyl acetate (11.2%), β- caryophyllene (9.9%) and selin-11-en-4-ol (8.9%) as the major components, while the rhizome oil was dominated by 1,8-cineole (12.7%) and cyperene (11.34%) and E,E-farnesol (5.5%). This analyses, especially that of the rhizome oil, suggest another chemotype of K. erecta from the known predominant cyperene-type.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research - J ESSENT OIL RES. 01/2010; 22(2):189-192.
  • 08/2009: pages 127 - 135; , ISBN: 9783527622931
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    ABSTRACT: A total of 96 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from African indigenous fermented products and cow's intestines to study their inhibitory capability against multi-drug-resistant uropathogens. Escherichia coli accounted for approximately 45% of isolated uropathogens, followed by Staphylococcus spp. (20%). The Gram negative uropathogens were highly resistant to quinolones, co-trimoxazole, teicoplanin and some beta-lactams, while the Staphylococcus spp. showed high resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams and macrolides. Twenty-four LAB isolates were selected based on their antimicrobial activity against two uropathogenic Staphylococcus aureus strains and bacteriocin production. LAB strains showing antimicrobial activity were grouped into smaller groups through amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Representative strains were identified as Weissella spp., Enterococcus faecium, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus brevis through sequencing of 16S rDNA. The Weissella spp. and L. brevis strains demonstrated remarkable inhibitory activity against seven strains of Gram negative uropathogens. Two strains of L. lactis produced a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance active against Lactobacillus sakei. In this study, an unusual high rate of co-trimoxazole, quinolones and macrolides resistance among uropathogens from south west Nigeria was discovered. Based on their sensitivity to Weissella spp., there is a potential for using these LAB as a natural approach for the protection against the uropathogens assayed.
    Archives of Microbiology 07/2009; 191(8):639-48. · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous investigations demonstrated that a standardized extract of ginger rhizome inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori in vitro with a minimum inhibitory concentration in the range 0.78 to 12.5 mug/mL. In the present work, the extract was tested in a rodent model of H. pylori-induced disease, the Mongolian gerbil, to examine the effects of the extract on both prevention and eradication of infection. The extract was administered to Mongolian gerbils at a daily dose of 100 mg/kg body weight in rations either 3 weeks prior to infection or 6 weeks post-infection. Treatment with the standardized ginger extract reduced H. pylori load as compared with controls and significantly (P<0.05) reduced both acute and chronic muscosal and submucosal inflammation, cryptitis, as well as epithelial cell degeneration and erosion induced by H. pylori. Importantly, the extract did not increase morbidity or mortality. Further investigations of the mechanism demonstrated that the ginger extract inhibited the activity of cyclooxygenase-2, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 8.5 mug/mL in vitro, inhibited the nuclear factor-kappaB transcriptional response in kBZ Jurkat cells (human T lymphocytes) with an IC(50) of 24.6 mug/mL, and significantly inhibited the release of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IC(50) values of 3.89, 7.7, 8.5, and 8.37 mug/mL, respectively. These results suggest ginger extracts may be useful for development as agents to reduce H. pylori-induced inflammation and as for gastric cancer chemoprevention.
    Pharmaceutical Biology 01/2009; 47(1):92-98. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori is the primary etiologic agent of peptic ulcer, duodenal ulcer, chronic gastritis, gastric adenocarcinoma and related gastroduodenal disorders. Current triple therapy, including antibiotics and proton-pump inhibitors, has been successful; however, adverse events, non-patient compliance and consequent relapse of Helicobacter pylori infections are common. Crude methanol extracts of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex. Maiden (Myrtaceae) stem bark were screened against a standard strain ATCC 43504 and ten clinical strains of H. pylori using the agar diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with defibrinated horse blood and grown in a microaerophilic incubator. All the strains except UCH 97002 and UCH 98020 were inhibited by the extract to varying degrees. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the susceptible strains tested ranged from 0.39 and 1.56 μg/mL. The urease activity of the three H. pylori strains tested decreased with increasing concentrations of the extract. The greatest inhibition of urease activity was observed in clinical strain UCH 97009. In addition, methanol extracts of the E. grandis enhanced cell aggregation of seven of the H. pylori strains leading to a decrease in the cell surface hydrophobicity. The salt aggregation test titer decreased from >3 to <1.5 for five of the strains and to <3 for two of the strains. Phytochemical screening of the plant revealed the presence of tannins, essential oils and saponins, while alkaloids were not detected. The anti-Helicobacter pylori activity observed in this study correlates well with the traditional use of this plant in Nigeria.
    12/2008; 47(1):13-17.
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    Olusegun O Soge, Bolanle A Adeniyi, Marilyn C Roberts
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    ABSTRACT: To determine antibiotic resistance genes associated with 17 Nigerian CTX-M-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmids from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections. The size and restriction patterns of the plasmids were determined, and antibiotic resistance genes were identified using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR assays, hybridization of PCR products with internal probes, and sequencing. All CTX-M plasmids were large (58-320 kb) and carried the following genes: aac(6')-Ib (aminoglycoside resistance) which included aac(6')-Ib-cr (aminoglycoside-fluoroquinolone resistance), aadA2 (aminoglycoside resistance), erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance), blaTEM-1 (ampicillin resistance), tet(A) (tetracycline resistance), sul1 (sulphonamide resistance), dfr (trimethoprim resistance) and intI1, an integrase associated with class 1 integrons. Eleven (65%) plasmids carried an mph(A) gene (macrolide resistance), seven (41%) plasmids carried a qnrB1 gene (low-level quinolone resistance) and four (24%) plasmids carried multiple cat genes (chloramphenicol resistance). catA2, catA3 and qnrB1 genes and a 6 kb PstI fragment, carrying the blaCTX-M gene, were sequenced. This is the first description of catA2 and catA3 genes in Klebsiella spp. and the first description of the erm(B) and floR genes associated with a CTX-M plasmid. This is also the first report of qnrB1 and aac(6')-Ib-cr in isolates from Africa and the first report of these two genes on the same plasmid.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 12/2006; 58(5):1048-53. · 5.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

243 Citations
47.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2013
    • University of Ibadan
      • • Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology
      • • College of Medicine
      Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria
  • 2009
    • Vanderbilt University
      Nashville, Michigan, United States
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Pharmacy Practice
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2004
    • Lagos State University
      • Department of Chemistry
      Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria