Mouhamadoul Toure

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

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Publications (6)54.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Several bariatric operations are currently used to treat obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. These vary in efficacy, but most are more effective than current pharmaceutical treatments. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) produces substantial body weight (BW) loss, enhanced glucose tolerance, and is associated with increased secretion of the gut hormone GLP-1. Given the success of GLP-1-based agents in lowering blood glucose and BW, we hypothesized that an individual sensitivity to GLP-1 receptor agonism could predict metabolic benefits of surgeries associated with increased GLP-1 secretion. One hundred ninety-seven high-fat-diet-induced obese male Long-Evans rats were monitored for BW loss during Exendin-4 (Ex4) administration. Stable populations of responders and non-responders were identified based on Ex4-induced BW loss and GLP-1-induced improvements in glucose tolerance. Sub-populations of Ex4 extreme responders and non-responders received RYGB. Following RYGB, responders and non-responders showed similar BW loss compared to sham, but non-responders retained impaired glucose tolerance. These data indicate that the GLP-1 response tests may predict some but not all of the improvements observed after RYGB. These findings present an opportunity to optimize the use of bariatric surgery based on an improved understanding of GLP-1 biology and suggest an opportunity for a more personalized therapeutic approach to the metabolic syndrome.
    Diabetes 11/2013; · 7.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bariatric surgery elevates serum bile acids. Conjugated bile acid administration, such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), improves insulin sensitivity, while short-circuiting bile acid circulation through ileal interposition surgery in rats raises TUDCA levels. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery outcomes could be recapitulated by short-circuiting the normal entero-hepatic bile circulation. We established a model wherein male obese rats underwent either bile diversion (BD) or Sham (SH) surgery. The BD group had a catheter inserted into the common bile duct and its distal end anchored into the mid-distal jejunum for 4-5 weeks. Glucose tolerance, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response, hepatic steatosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were measured. Rats' post-BD lost significantly more weight than the SH-rats. BD rats gained less fat mass post-surgery. BD rats had improved glucose tolerance, increased higher post-prandial GLP-1 response and serum bile acids but less liver steatosis. Serum bile acid levels including TUDCA concentrations were higher in BD compared to SH pair-fed rats. Fecal bile acid levels were not different. Liver ER stress (CHOP mRNA and pJNK protein) was decreased in BD rats. Bile acid gavage (TUDCA/UDCA) in diet-induced obese rats, elevated serum TUDCA and concomitantly reduced hepatic steatosis and ER stress (CHOP mRNA). These data demonstrate the ability of alterations in bile acids to recapitulate important metabolic improvements seen after bariatric surgery. Further, our work establishes a model for focused study of bile acids in the context of bariatric surgery that may lead to the identification of therapeutics for metabolic disease.
    Endocrinology 04/2013; · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) reduce weight and improve glucose metabolism in obese patients, although it is not clear if metabolic changes are independent of weight loss. We investigated alterations in glucose metabolism in rats following RYGB or VSG. Rats underwent RYGB or VSG and were compared to sham-operated rats fed ad lib or pair-fed to animals that received RYGB. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests were performed to assess glycemic function independent of incretin response. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was used to compare tissue-specific changes in insulin sensitivity following each procedure. A mixed-meal tolerance test was used to assess the effect of each surgery on postprandial release of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)(7-36) and glucose tolerance, and was also performed in rats given GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39). Following RYGB or VSG, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity improved in proportion to weight loss. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was significantly better in rats that received RYGB or VSG compared with rats fed ad lib or pair-fed, whereas glucose clearance was similar in all groups. During the mixed-meal tolerance test, plasma levels of GLP-1(7-36) and insulin were greatly and comparably increased in rats that received RYGB and VSG compared with those that were pair-fed or fed ad lib. Administration of a GLP-1 receptor antagonist prevented improvements in glucose and insulin responses after a meal among rats that received RYGB or VSG. In obese rats, VSG is as effective as RYGB for increasing secretion of GLP-1 and insulin and improving hepatic sensitivity to insulin; these effects are independent of weight loss.
    Gastroenterology 06/2011; 141(3):950-8. · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious procedure for eliciting weight loss in humans, and many patients undergoing the procedure experience significant lessening of their symptoms of type-2 diabetes in addition to losing weight. We have adapted two bariatric surgical procedures commonly employed in humans to a rat model to begin to understand the mechanisms underlying the improvements in energy homeostasis. Young adult male rats received either roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and were assessed for body weight, food intake and parameters of glucose homeostasis over a 28-week period. Control rats received either a sham surgical procedure or else were unoperated. RYGB and VSG had comparable beneficial effects relative to controls. They ate less food and lost more weight, and they both had improved glucose parameters. The most intriguing aspect of the findings is that the two surgical procedures had such similar effects in spite of quite different rearrangements of the gastrointestinal system.
    Physiology & Behavior 06/2011; 105(1):120-3. · 3.03 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2011; 140(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical intervention produces sustainable weight loss and metabolic improvement in obese individuals. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces dramatic, sustained weight loss; we investigated whether these changes result from improved sensitivity to leptin. VSG was performed in Long-Evans rats with diet-induced obesity. Naïve or sham-operated rats, fed either ad libitum or pair-fed with the VSG group, were used as controls. Following surgery, body weights and food intake were monitored. We investigated energy expenditure, meal patterns, leptin sensitivity, and expression of pro-opiomelanocortin/agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus of the rats. We observed sustained losses in weight and body fat in male and female rats after VSG. Weight loss persisted after the disappearance of a transient, postsurgical food intake reduction. Resting energy expenditure was similar between control and VSG rats. VSG rats maintained their reduced body weights. However, they responded to a chronic food restriction challenge by overeating, which resulted in prerestriction, rather than pre-VSG, body weights. Consistent with lower adiposity, VSG decreased plasma leptin levels. Although VSG slightly improved leptin's anorectic action, the response was comparable to that observed in controls matched for adiposity by caloric restriction. Changes in hypothalamic neuropeptide expression were consistent with the lower body weight and lower leptin levels but cannot account for the sustained weight loss. VSG causes sustained reduction in body weight, which results from loss of fat mass. The maintenance of weight loss observed did not result from changes in sensitivity to leptin.
    Gastroenterology 03/2010; 138(7):2426-36, 2436.e1-3. · 12.82 Impact Factor