Sonia Pérez-Yagüe

Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (5)28.27 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) have been proposed for numerous biomedical applications, little is known about their biotransformation and long-term toxicity in the body. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been proven efficient for in vivo drug delivery, but these results must nonetheless be sustained by comprehensive studies of long-term distribution, degradation and toxicity. We studied DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles effects in vitro on NCTC 1469 non-parenchymal hepatocytes, and analyzed their biodistribution and biotransformation in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Our results indicate that DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles have little effect on cell viability, oxidative stress, cell cycle or apoptosis on NCTC 1469 cells in vitro. In vivo distribution and transformation was studied by alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements, a technique that permits distinction of MNP from other iron species. Our results show that DMSA-coated MNP accumulate in spleen, liver and lung tissues for extended periods of time, in which nanoparticles undergo a process of conversion from superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to other non-superparamagnetic iron forms, with no significant signs of toxicity. This work provides first evidence of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles biotransformation in vivo.
    Journal of Controlled Release 07/2013; · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease regulated by infiltrating monocytes and T cells, among other cell types. Macrophage recruitment to atherosclerotic lesions is controlled by monocyte infiltration into plaques. Once in the lesion, macrophage proliferation in situ, apoptosis, and differentiation to an inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2) are involved in progression to advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We studied the role of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) p110γ in the regulation of in situ apoptosis, macrophage proliferation and polarization towards M1 or M2 phenotypes in atherosclerotic lesions. We analyzed atherosclerosis development in LDLR(-/-)p110γ(+/-) and LDLR(-/-)p110γ(-/-) mice, and performed expression and functional assays in tissues and primary cells from these and from p110γ(+/-) and p110γ(-/-) mice. Lack of p110γ in LDLR(-/-) mice reduces the atherosclerosis burden. Atherosclerotic lesions in fat-fed LDLR(-/-)p110γ(-/-) mice were smaller than in LDLR(-/-)p110γ(+/-) controls, which coincided with decreased macrophage proliferation in LDLR(-/-)p110γ(-/-) mouse lesions. This proliferation defect was also observed in p110γ(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) stimulated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and was associated with higher intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. In contrast, T cell proliferation was unaffected in LDLR(-/-)p110γ(-/-) mice. Moreover, p110γ deficiency did not affect macrophage polarization towards the M1 or M2 phenotypes or apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques, or polarization in cultured BMM. Our results suggest that higher cAMP levels and the ensuing inhibition of macrophage proliferation contribute to atheroprotection in LDLR(-/-) mice lacking p110γ. Nonetheless, p110γ deletion does not appear to be involved in apoptosis, in macrophage polarization or in T cell proliferation.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e72674. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of p110δ PI3K in lymphoid cells has been studied extensively, showing its importance in immune cell differentiation, activation and development. Altered T cell localization in p110δ-deficient mouse spleen suggested a role for p110δ in non-hematopoietic stromal cells, which maintain hematopoietic cell segregation. We tested this hypothesis using p110δ(WT/WT) mouse bone marrow to reconstitute lethally irradiated p110δ(WT/WT) or p110δ(D910A/D910A) (which express catalytically inactive p110δ) recipients, and studied localization, number and percentage of hematopoietic cell subsets in spleen and lymph nodes, in homeostatic conditions and after antigen stimulation. These analyses showed diffuse T cell areas in p110δ(D910A/D910A) and in reconstituted p110δ(D910A/D910A) mice in homeostatic conditions. In these mice, spleen CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell numbers did not increase in response to antigen, suggesting that a p110δ(D910A/D910A) stroma defect impedes correct T cell response. FACS analysis of spleen stromal cell populations showed a decrease in the percentage of gp38(-)CD31(+) cells in p110δ(D910A/D910A) mice. qRT-PCR studies detected p110δ mRNA expression in p110δ(WT/WT) spleen gp38(-)CD31(+) and gp38(+)CD31(+) subsets, which was reduced in p110δ(D910A/D910A) spleen. Lack of p110δ activity in these cell populations correlated with lower LTβR, CCL19 and CCL21 mRNA levels; these molecules participate in T cell localization to specific spleen areas. Our results could explain the lower T cell numbers and more diffuse T cell areas found in p110δ(D910A/D910A) mouse spleen, as well as the lower T cell expansion after antigen stimulation in p110δ(D910A/D910A) compared with p110δ(WT/WT) mice.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e72960. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As radio- and chemotherapy-based cancer treatments affect both tumors and healthy tissue, cancer immunotherapy attempts to specifically enhance the natural immune response to tumor cells. In mouse models of cancer, we tested uniform dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles as a delivery system for the anti-tumorigenic cytokine IFN-γ. IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. We analyzed nanoparticle biodistribution before and after IFN-γ conjugation, as well as the efficiency of nanoparticle accumulation in tumors, IFN-γ release in the area of interest, and the effects of both on tumor development. At the tumor site, we observed a high degree of nanoparticle accumulation and of cytokine delivery, which led to increased T cell and macrophage infiltration and promoted an anti-angiogenic effect. The combined action led to a notable reduction in tumor size. Our findings indicate that IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy.
    Biomaterials 04/2011; 32(11):2938-52. · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uptake, cytotoxicity and interaction of improved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were studied in cells, tissues and organs after single and multiple exposures. We prepared dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition in organic medium, resulting in aqueous suspensions with a small hydrodynamic size (< 100 nm), high saturation magnetization and susceptibility, high nuclear magnetic resonance contrast and low cytotoxicity. In vitro and in vivo behavior showed that these nanoparticles are efficient carriers for drug delivery to the liver and brain that can be combined with MRI detection.
    Nanomedicine 04/2010; 5(3):397-408. · 5.26 Impact Factor