In-Hyuk Jung

Ewha Womans University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (6)52.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: CD137 (4-1BB), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, has been reported to be expressed in atherosclerotic plaques, and to promote lesion formation. However, the role of CD137 in mediating atherosclerotic plaque stability and the possible underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) and CD137-deficient ApoE(-/-) (ApoE(-/-)CD137(-) (/) (-)) mice fed a chow diet for 66 wk were used. CD137 induces plaque instability, which is characterized by increased plaque necrosis, decreased collagen content, decreased vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) content, and increased macrophage infiltration. CD137 also increases the infiltration of effector T (Teff) cells into plaque lesion sites, resulting in increased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) expression. Interestingly, Teff-cell-derived IFN-γ inhibits collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, CD137 activation increases the apoptosis of VSMCs, possibly by decreasing the antiapoptotic regulator, Bcl-2, and subsequently up-regulating cleaved caspase-3. In macrophages, activation of CD137 signaling boosted the oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 signaling pathways. In summary, activation of CD137 signaling decreases the stability of advanced atherosclerotic plaques via its combined effects on Teff cells, VSMCs, and macrophages.-Jung, I.-H., Choi, J.-H., Jin, J., Jeong, S.-J., Jeon, S., Lim, C., Lee, M.-R., Yoo, J.-Y., Sonn, S.-K., Kim, Y. H., Choi, B. K., Kwon, B. S., Seoh, J.-Y., Lee, C. W., Kim, D.-Y., Oh, G. T. CD137-inducing factors from T cells and macrophages accelerate the destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques in hyperlipidemic mice.
    FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperlipidemia is a well-recognized risk factor for atherosclerosis and can be regulated by adipokines. Expression of the adipokine resistin-like molecule alpha (Retnla) is regulated by food intake; whether Retnla has a role in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis is unknown. Here we report that Retnla has a cholesterol-lowering effect and protects against atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice. On a high-fat diet, Retnla deficiency promotes hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis, whereas Retnla overexpression reverses these effects and improves the serum lipoprotein profile, with decreased cholesterol in the very low-density lipoprotein fraction concomitant with reduced serum apolipoprotein B levels. We show that Retnla upregulates cholesterol-7-α-hydroxylase, a key hepatic enzyme in the cholesterol catabolic pathway, through induction of its transcriptional activator liver receptor homologue-1, leading to increased excretion of cholesterol in the form of bile acids. These findings define Retnla as a novel therapeutic target for treating hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis.
    Nature Communications 01/2014; 5:4410. · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Blocking agents targeting cell adhesion molecules have been developed to prevent cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, whereas relatively little attention has been paid to the therapeutic potential of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 as an inflammatory disease target. Two novel, fully human antibodies, H6 and 7H, against human VCAM-1 (hVCAM-1) were developed and tested to validate the hypothesis that blocking VCAM-1 ameliorates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Treatment with H6 or 7H effectively inhibited VCAM-1 adhesion to inflammatory cells, and reduced RhoA activation and the production of reactive oxygen species in human umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells. As 7H showed binding affinity to both murine VCAM-1 (mVCAM-1) and hVCAM-1, the therapeutic effects of 7H in ApoE(-/-) mice were tested. After confirming specific in vivo binding activity of 7H to mVCAM-1, we showed that administering 7H resulted in significantly ameliorated plaque formation compared to administering a control antibody in ApoE(-/-) mice fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Also, 7H treatment significantly reduced infiltration of CD45(+) cells into plaques and reduced inflammation and improved plaque stability. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the anti-VCAM-1 antibody attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice, improves plaque inflammation and stability as well as inhibiting the adhesion of inflammatory cell, and suggest that blocking VCAM-1 with a monoclonal antibody may be an effective means of anti-atherosclerotic therapy.
    Atherosclerosis 12/2012; · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the synergistic effect of 6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl- 1H-tetrazol-5-yl) butoxy]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H )-quinolinone (cilostazol) and Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) was examined in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) null mice. Co-treatment with GbE and cilostazol synergistically decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in ApoE null mice fed a high-fat diet. Co-treatment resulted in a significantly decreased atherosclerotic lesion area compared to untreated ApoE mice. The inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules such as monocyte chemoattractant-1 (MCP-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and VCAM-1 which can initiate atherosclerosis were significantly reduced by the co-treatment of cilostazol with GbE. Further, the infiltration of macrophages into the intima was decreased by co-treatment. These results suggest that co-treatment of GbE with cilostazol has a more potent anti-atherosclerotic effect than treatment with cilostazol alone in hyperlipidemic ApoE null mice and could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of atherosclerosis.
    Experimental and Molecular Medicine 01/2012; 44(5):311-8. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early events in atherosclerosis occur in the aortic intima and involve monocytes that become macrophages. We looked for these cells in the steady state adult mouse aorta, and surprisingly, we found a dominance of dendritic cells (DCs) in the intima. In contrast to aortic adventitial macrophages, CD11c(+)MHC II(hi) DCs were poorly phagocytic but were immune stimulatory. DCs were of two types primarily: classical Flt3-Flt3L signaling-dependent, CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent, CD14(+)CD11b(+)DC-SIGN(+) monocyte-derived DCs. Both types expanded during atherosclerosis. By crossing Flt3(-/-) to Ldlr(-/-) atherosclerosis-prone mice, we developed a selective and marked deficiency of classical CD103(+) aortic DCs, and they were associated with exacerbated atherosclerosis without alterations in blood lipids. Concomitantly, the Flt3(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice had fewer Foxp3(+) Treg cells and increased inflammatory cytokine mRNAs in the aorta. Therefore, functional DCs are dominant in normal aortic intima and, in contrast to macrophages, CD103(+) classical DCs are associated with atherosclerosis protection.
    Immunity 11/2011; 35(5):819-31. · 19.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, which includes CD40, LIGHT, and OX40, plays important roles in atherosclerosis. CD137 (4-1BB), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, has been reported to be expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions. However, limited information is available on the precise role of CD137 in atherosclerosis and the effects of blocking CD137/CD137 ligand signaling on lesion formation. We generated CD137-deficient apolipoprotein E-knockout mice (ApoE(-/-) CD137(-/-)) and LDL-receptor-knockout mice (Ldlr(-/-)CD137(-/-)) to investigate the role of CD137 in atherogenesis. The deficiency of CD137 induced a reduction in atherosclerotic plaque lesions in both atherosclerosis mouse models, which was attributed to the downregulation of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. CD137 signaling promoted the production of inflammatory molecules, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, in endothelial cells. Stimulation of CD137 ligand signaling activated monocytes/macrophages and augmented the production of proinflammatory cytokines in atherosclerotic vessels. CD137/CD137 ligand signaling plays multiple roles in the progression of atherosclerosis, and thus, blockade of this pathway is a promising therapeutic target for the disease.
    Circulation 02/2010; 121(9):1124-33. · 15.20 Impact Factor