Marie Langelot

University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Publications (8)55.85 Total impact

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  • Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 11/2012; 29(9):1180. · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory, respiratory disease caused by an abnormal reactivity against allergens. The most promising treatments for asthma are based on specific immunotherapies, but they lack efficiency and can induce deleterious side effects. Among new modalities of immunotherapy currently in development, DNA vaccination presents a promising approach, as it enables targeted immunotherapy in association with reduced allergenicity. We have developed an innovative, DNA-based vaccine against Dermatophagoides farinae 1 allergen (Der f 1), one of the allergens most commonly encountered by asthma patients in Europe. Intramuscular administration of a Der f 1-encoding plasmid formulated with the block copolymer 704 in healthy mice induced a strong humoral and cellular response with a pro-helper T cell type 1 bias. Administration of the same formulation in asthmatic mice, according to an early vaccination protocol, led to a reduction of airway hyperresponsiveness and a significant decrease in the level of inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage of Der f 1-vaccinated mice.
    Human gene therapy 03/2012; 23(6):597-608. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Second generation therapeutic vaccines based upon recombinant allergens or natural extracts, potentially formulated in vector systems or adjuvants, are being developed. To this aim, preclinical studies in relevant animal models are needed to select proper allergens, formulations and administration schemes. To develop a chronic house dust mite (HDM) allergy model to evaluate sublingual therapeutic vaccine candidates. The BABL/c mice that were used were sensitized with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpte) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Dfar) mite extracts by intraperitoneal injections followed by aerosol exposures. Animals subsequently underwent sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with either Dpte, Dfar or Dpte/Dfar extracts, twice a week for 8 weeks. SLIT efficacy was assessed by whole body plethysmography, lung histology and broncho-alveolar lavages cell counts. Specific T cell and antibody responses to major and minor HDM allergens were monitored in tissues and serum/saliva, respectively. Mice sensitized to Dpte and Dfar allergens exhibited strong airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and lung inflammatory infiltrates including eosinophils. Sensitized animals mounted Th2-biased cellular and humoral responses specific for group 1 and 2 major allergens, as well as group 5, 7 and 10 minor allergens. This phenotype was sustained for at least 2 months, allowing the evaluation of immunotherapeutic protocols with HDM extracts-based vaccines. In this model, SLIT decreased AHR and Th2 responses and induced HDM-specific IgAs in saliva. The Dpte/Dfar mix proved the most efficacious when compared to Dpte or Dfar extracts alone. The efficacy of a sublingual vaccine based on a Dpte/Dfar allergen extract mix was demonstrated in a well standardized murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation based on clinically relevant mite allergens. The latter will be used as a benchmark for evaluation of future vaccines, including recombinant allergens. This HDM allergic airway inflammation animal model is a useful tool to design and select candidate vaccines to be tested in humans.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 09/2011; 41(12):1784-92. · 4.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exacerbations of asthma are the main cause of asthma morbidity. They induce acute respiratory failure, and sometimes death. Two immunological signals acting in synergy are necessary for inducing asthma exacerbations. The first, triggered by allergens and/or unknown agents leads to the chronic Th2 inflammation characteristic of asthma. The second, caused by either viral infection, allergens, pollutants or a combination of these, results in an acute Th1 and Th2 inflammation precipitating symptoms. In both, innate and adaptive immunities are involved, providing a series of potential targets for therapy. Molecules associated to the first, chronic inflammation constitute targets for preventing therapies, when these related to the second, acute signal provide the rationale for curative treatments. Toll like receptors and bronchial epithelial cell-derived cytokines, engaged upstream of inflammation constitute interesting candidates for future treatments. The great heterogeneity of asthma has to be taken into account when considering targets for therapy to identify clusters of responders and nonresponders, and an integrative system biology approach will be necessary to go further.
    Pharmacology [?] Therapeutics 03/2011; 131(1):114-29. · 7.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic asthma is a T helper type 2 (T(H)2)-dominated disease of the lung. In people with asthma, a fraction of CD4(+) T cells express the CX3CL1 receptor, CX3CR1, and CX3CL1 expression is increased in airway smooth muscle, lung endothelium and epithelium upon allergen challenge. Here we found that untreated CX3CR1-deficient mice or wild-type (WT) mice treated with CX3CR1-blocking reagents show reduced lung disease upon allergen sensitization and challenge. Transfer of WT CD4(+) T cells into CX3CR1-deficient mice restored the cardinal features of asthma, and CX3CR1-blocking reagents prevented airway inflammation in CX3CR1-deficient recipients injected with WT T(H)2 cells. We found that CX3CR1 signaling promoted T(H)2 survival in the inflamed lungs, and injection of B cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 protein (BCl-2)-transduced CX3CR1-deficient T(H)2 cells into CX3CR1-deficient mice restored asthma. CX3CR1-induced survival was also observed for T(H)1 cells upon airway inflammation but not under homeostatic conditions or upon peripheral inflammation. Therefore, CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 may represent attractive therapeutic targets in asthma.
    Nature medicine 10/2010; 16(11):1305-12. · 28.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Th2 cells orchestrate allergic asthma and the cytokines they produce (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) are deleterious in allergy. Therefore, it is important to identify key signaling molecules expressed by Th2 cells that are essential for their function. We have previously shown that dihydropyridines selectively modulate Th2 cell functions. Because dihydropyridines bind to and modulate voltage-dependent calcium (Ca(v)1) channel in excitable cells, we aimed at showing that Th2 cells selectively express functional Ca(v)1-related channels, the inhibition of which may prevent asthma. We looked for Ca(v)1 channel expression in Th2 and Th1 cells by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. We sequenced the isoforms expressed by Th2 cells and tested whether Ca(v)1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (Ca(v)1AS) affected Ca(2+) signaling and cytokine production. Finally, we tested the effect of Ca(v)1AS in the passive asthma model by injection of ovalbumin-specific Th2 cells transfected with Ca(v)1AS into BALB/c mice challenged with intranasal ovalbumin and in the active model of asthma by intranasal delivery of Ca(v)1AS together with soluble ovalbumin in BALB/c mice previously immunized with ovalbumin in alum. We show that mouse Th2 but not Th1 cells expressed Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 channels. Th2 cells transfected with Ca(v)1AS had impaired Ca(2+) signaling and cytokine production, and lost their ability to induce airway inflammation on adoptive transfer. Furthermore, intranasal administration of Ca(v)1AS suppressed airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in an active model of asthma. These results indicate that Th2 cells selectively express Ca(v)1 channels that may be efficiently targeted in T lymphocytes to prevent experimental asthma.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 02/2010; 181(12):1310-7. · 11.04 Impact Factor