Fan-Zhen Kong

Binzhou Medical University, Pei-chen, Shandong Sheng, China

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Publications (2)0.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To provide sectional anatomic data for the precise localization of developmental malformation of fetal brain in sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After abdominal and pelvic MRI scanning, the gravid specimen was cut into serial sagittal slices in correspondence with MRI in a low temperature laboratory to demonstrate the structures of fetal brain. (1) Directional determination of the sloping and rotating fetal head. From the serial sagittal sections of pregnant cadaver at term, we concluded that, the longitudinal lying and cephalic presentation fetal had run into maternal pelvis, and rotated and sloped to right. Anteroposterior position and median sagittal plane of the fetal was in correspondence with his mother's. (2) Seven serial sagittal sections of the fetal brain were obtained through lateral surface of the right cerebral hemisphere, lateral sulcus, internal capsule, median sagittal plane, middle cerebellar peduncle, brainstem, and lateral surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. Through the comparison study between sagittal sections and corresponding MRI of fetal brain at term, we could obtain morphological anatomic structures and MRI of fetal brain, providing morphological demonstration of the intrauterine development of fetal brain and auxiliary diagnosis of ultrasound and MRI in pregnant woman.
    Taiwanese journal of obstetrics & gynecology 06/2011; 50(2):172-8.
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    ABSTRACT: To explore a method to obtain sub-millimeter data of the thin transverse section of the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF), and to study the thin transverse sectional anatomy of the adult pterygopalatine fossa and its communicating structure for providing anatomic gist for the imaging diagnosis and minimal invasive operation when PPF diseased. MATERIAL and Two heads of adult cadaver without macroscopic trauma (four sides of PPF) were selected to observe. Images of 0.6 mm-thick multi-planar construction (MPR) were obtained with multislice spiral CT (MSCT) based on the superior orbitomeatal line. Then, the specimens were sliced into 0.1 mm serial section on the transverse plane with the computerized milling machine, the figures were taken with digital camera and the sectional data were stored in the computer. Lastly, the thin transversal section of PPF was investigated and compared with multislice spiral CT images acquired by MPR technique to explore and discuss the anatomy of the thin transverse section of the internal structure of PPF. PPF was divided into four portions: infrapterygopalatine portion, pterygopalatine ganglionic one, suprapterygopalatine one and roof of PPF according to the structural characteristics of the transverse section of PPF. The infrapterygopalatine portion communicated laterally with the infratemporal fossa through the pterygomaxillary fissure and communicated downwards with the oral cavity via palatine greater and lesser canals. The pterygopalatine ganglion was shown clearly in the pterygopalatine ganglionic portion, and its dimensions were 3.91x1.92 mm at the best layer. In the suprapterygopalatine portion, the sphenopalatine foramen and artery were obviously shown on the medial wall, while the palatovaginal canal and artery, the pterygoid canal and artery, and the foramen rotundum and maxillary nerve were shown from the inferiomedial to laterosuperior on the posterior wall. The vomerovaginal canal and artery were located at the slightly superior portion of the medial side of the palatovaginal canal. Figures of thin transverse section and multislice spiral CT have highly consistency for the display of PPF. Both of them can correctly identify the micro-structure, the complex relationship of the connectivity and the spatial localization in the narrow space of PPF. It can provide reference gist for the imaging diagnosis and minimal invasive operation.
    Turkish neurosurgery 04/2010; 20(2):151-8. · 0.58 Impact Factor